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Pop - Released December 2, 2003 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

The contents of Star-Club Präsentiert Grace Jones, released in Germany through Universal, are the same as the more widely distributed Classic Grace Jones, issued the same year. It contains most of Jones' highlights through 1982's Living My Life. Since it doesn't include 1985's "Slave to the Rhythm" or the 1977 number one club single "I Need a Man," it is not definitive, but it's a handy overview of her earlier work, containing lots of classic material -- "My Jamaican Guy," "Nipple to the Bottle," and "Pull Up to the Bumper," along with inspired covers of the Pretenders' "Private Life," Roxy Music's "Love Is the Drug," and the Normal's "Warm Leatherette" -- recorded at Compass Point in the Bahamas with the studio's all-star backing cast, anchored by Sly & Robbie. Only "La Vie en Rose" dates from her '70s releases. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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R&B - Released January 1, 1998 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

For anyone but die-hard fans, Private Life: The Compass Point Sessions will simply be too much Grace Jones in one place. Comprised entirely of recordings she made at Compass Point Studios during the early '80s, the double-disc set features 26 tracks, including two unreleased cuts and four previously unreleased mixes of hit songs. These are unquestionably Jones' best material, mainly because she was supported by a top-notch studio band and produced by Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare. Given that talent, it's hard to go wrong, but Jones' arch, detached persona hasn't aged well. Several of these cuts work well, several seem hampered by Jones, but there's no denying that any serious fans of her work will find this necessary. Less-dedicated listeners, however, are advised to stick with Nightclubbing, which is the best album to be culled from these sessions. It's much more palatable for casual listeners. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Disco - Released May 1, 1981 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

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By all means a phenomenal pop album that hit number nine on the black albums chart and crossed over to penetrate the pop charts at number 32, Nightclubbing saw Grace Jones working once again with Sly Dunbar, Robbie Shakespeare, and the remainder of the Compass Point team. Nightclubbing also continues Jones' tradition of picking excellent songs to reinterpret. This time out, the Police's "Demolition Man," Bill Withers' "Use Me," and Iggy Pop's "Nightclubbing" receive radical reinterpretations; "Nightclubbing" is glacial in both tempo and lack of warmth, while both "Use Me" and "Demolition Man" fit perfectly into Jones' lyrical scheme. Speaking of a lyrical scheme, "Pull Up to the Bumper" (number five black singles, number two club play) is so riddled with naughty double entendres -- or is it just about parallel parking? -- that it renders Musique's "In the Bush" as daring as Paul Anka's "Puppy Love." Drive it in between what, Grace? It's not just lyrics that make the song stick out; jingling spirals of rhythm guitar and a simplistic, squelching, mid-tempo rhythm make the song effective, even without considering Jones' presence. Sly & Robbie provide ideal backdrops for Jones yet again, casting a brisk but not bristly sheen over buoyant structures. Never before and never since has a precisely chipped block of ore been so seductive. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Pop - Released May 9, 1980 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

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Grace Jones teamed with the great reggae production duo of Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare on this 1980 album, and made the transition from straight dance and club act into quasi-pop star with reggae and urban contemporary leanings. The single "Private Life" was one of her best, and the overall album had more energy and production gloss than previous LPs that had been aimed completely at the club market. It helped that Jones seemed enthused about the session and really put herself into the songs. © Ron Wynn /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1979 | Universal Music Group International

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A fine dance and club album, Grace Jones was still essentially a disco act when she recorded this at the end of the '70s. The campy tendencies and flat vocals were subordinated to the array of cross-rhythms, textures, and production devices buttressing the tracks. Jones did some outstanding numbers during this era, but seldom utilized her voice beyond either a decorative or supporting role. She wasn't (and still isn't) a soulful or great singer, but future albums would demonstrate that she could do more things than mouth lines and insert herself into rhythm tracks. © Ron Wynn /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 10, 2008 | Wall of Sound

After 19 years, Grace Jones finally released a new studio album, and it's a weird one, nostalgic and timeless in equal measure. Her collaborators (including Brian Eno, Tricky, Wendy & Lisa, Sly & Robbie, Tony Allen, and others) set up instrumental backdrops that explicitly recall not only her own early-'80s albums, but also those albums' influence on the later work of Massive Attack, Tricky, et al. At the same time, Jones' old lyrical persona -- the androgynous cyber-demon who uses scorn as an erotic weapon -- has been largely abandoned; only on "Corporate Cannibal" does that version of her reappear, atop a track that sounds inspired by Massive Attack's "Inertia Creeps." Instead, we get a nostalgic, autobiographical Grace Jones, which is interesting and pretty much totally unexpected. The songs "William's Blood" and "I'm Crying (Mother's Tears)" find the now 60-year-old Jones looking back on her childhood in Jamaica, recalling her mother singing in church and comforting her as a nightmare-stricken little girl. Her voice changes on these songs; her accent grows thicker, abandoning the female-Terminator delivery of classic tracks like "Nightclubbing" and "Pull Up to the Bumper" in favor of a voice that's like a more gravelly Sister Carol. Of course, age has put a few crinkles into her throaty delivery, which helps when she ramps up the aggression on songs like "This Is" and the title track (a collaboration with Tricky); she's as scary as ever, when she wants to be. A calculated look back to her glory days and even earlier, Hurricane is possibly Grace Jones' most focused artistic statement and a worthy sequel to her classic early-'80s albums. © Phil Freeman /TiVo
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Reggae - Released September 5, 2011 | Wall of Sound

After 19 years, Grace Jones finally released a new studio album, and it's a weird one, nostalgic and timeless in equal measure. Her collaborators (including Brian Eno, Tricky, Wendy & Lisa, Sly & Robbie, Tony Allen, and others) set up instrumental backdrops that explicitly recall not only her own early-'80s albums, but also those albums' influence on the later work of Massive Attack, Tricky, et al. At the same time, Jones' old lyrical persona -- the androgynous cyber-demon who uses scorn as an erotic weapon -- has been largely abandoned; only on "Corporate Cannibal" does that version of her reappear, atop a track that sounds inspired by Massive Attack's "Inertia Creeps." Instead, we get a nostalgic, autobiographical Grace Jones, which is interesting and pretty much totally unexpected. The songs "William's Blood" and "I'm Crying (Mother's Tears)" find the now 60-year-old Jones looking back on her childhood in Jamaica, recalling her mother singing in church and comforting her as a nightmare-stricken little girl. Her voice changes on these songs; her accent grows thicker, abandoning the female-Terminator delivery of classic tracks like "Nightclubbing" and "Pull Up to the Bumper" in favor of a voice that's like a more gravelly Sister Carol. Of course, age has put a few crinkles into her throaty delivery, which helps when she ramps up the aggression on songs like "This Is" and the title track (a collaboration with Tricky); she's as scary as ever, when she wants to be. A calculated look back to her glory days and even earlier, Hurricane is possibly Grace Jones' most focused artistic statement and a worthy sequel to her classic early-'80s albums. © Phil Freeman /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 1, 1977 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

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Disco mix king Tom Moulton produced these tracks at Sigma Sound in Philadelphia using the same musicians Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff held hostage for their sessions. The results are quite different: though polished, these tracks don't jump out at you. It's really a producer's album. Moulton probably had these tracks completed long before he knew who was going to sing them. Give Grace Jones credit though, she gives credence to old fuddies like "Send in the Clowns," "La Vie en Rose" is lilting, and "I Need a Man," displays a vulnerable Jones. © Andrew Hamilton /TiVo
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Disco - Released May 4, 2015 | Universal Music Group International

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The Island label reissued Grace Jones' first three albums as digital downloads in 2014, but The Disco Years, released the following year, brought the recordings back to physical life with compact disc and vinyl editions. Collectors were obviously in mind. The set contains Portfolio (1977), Fame (1978), and Muse (1979), all of which were recorded at Philadelphia's Sigma Sound with disco pioneer Tom Moulton as producer, in their entirety. Additionally, there are cuts from the single releases, including the 1977 nonalbum A-side "La Vie en Rose." The packaging is striking and colorful, joined by in-depth liner notes. While not as distinctive as her '80s work with Sly & Robbie and Trevor Horn, these recordings are undeniable -- the source of a half-dozen Top Ten Billboard disco hits, all rich with drama and finesse. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 1, 1977 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

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Disco mix king Tom Moulton produced these tracks at Sigma Sound in Philadelphia using the same musicians Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff held hostage for their sessions. The results are quite different: though polished, these tracks don't jump out at you. It's really a producer's album. Moulton probably had these tracks completed long before he knew who was going to sing them. Give Grace Jones credit though, she gives credence to old fuddies like "Send in the Clowns," "La Vie en Rose" is lilting, and "I Need a Man," displays a vulnerable Jones. © Andrew Hamilton /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2003 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Basically, this Grace Jones entry in the Millennium Collection series is a one-disc version of Private Life: The Compass Point Sessions with "La Vie en Rose" added as representation of her early disco years. The Compass Point years were great, with Sly & Robbie providing the groovy reggae backbeat and Jones supplying the European iciness. The cosmopolitan and paranoid versions of Roxy Music's "Love Is the Drug," the Normal's "Warm Leatherette," and the Pretenders' "Private Life" are all excellent. Although the collection somehow leaves off her signature tune, "Slave to the Rhythm," the tunes written by Grace and friends are just as good, especially the widely sampled "My Jamaican Guy." If the compilers had included the few good singles from Jones' post-Island period it would have made the collection all the more valuable, but there's still a lot of great music here. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Disco - Released December 3, 1985 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Originally released in 1985, Island Life compiles highlights from Grace Jones' 1977 debut through 1985’s Slave to the Rhythm. It’s a concise overview that features four Top Ten U.S. club hits (“I Need a Man,” “Do or Die,” “Pull Up to the Bumper,” “Slave to the Rhythm”), as well as an additional smattering of choice cuts from her late-‘70s collaborations with Tom Moulton and her stellar ‘80s work with Sly & Robbie. It’s a decent introduction for casual fans but lacks crucial material like “Warm Leatherette” and “Nipple to the Bottle.” A later edition, dubbed Island Life 2, adds "Pars," "Feel Up," and two remixes of "Sex Drive." © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Pop - Released June 17, 2016 | Universal Music Group International

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Dance - Released January 1, 2004 | Capitol Records

Chic's Nile Rodgers produced this Grace Jones album as part of a new deal she signed in the late '80s with Manhattan. Unfortunately, she didn't remain on the label very long, even though this was among her better LPs and included a fine single in "(I'm Not Perfect) But I'm Perfect For You." There were rumors that Jones and Rodgers didn't get along, and perhaps they didn't, but the album wound up being one of her most commercially viable. © Ron Wynn /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2006 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Though its scope is wide, ranging from Jones' 1977 debut through 1993's number one club single "Sex Drive," The Grace Jones Story -- a two-disc compilation released in 2006 -- contains nothing from 1985's Slave to the Rhythm, likely due to a licensing issue with the ZTT label. Otherwise, this contains virtually everything a casual fan could want, and it's wise to give Jones' '70s material (much of it solid, straightforward disco) more attention. There are 28 tracks in all, including classic early-'80s club singles like "Pull Up to the Bumper" and "Nipple to the Bottle" -- some of the baddest genre-defying club music ever laid down. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 1, 1977 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Disco mix king Tom Moulton produced these tracks at Sigma Sound in Philadelphia using the same musicians Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff held hostage for their sessions. The results are quite different: though polished, these tracks don't jump out at you. It's really a producer's album. Moulton probably had these tracks completed long before he knew who was going to sing them. Give Grace Jones credit though, she gives credence to old fuddies like "Send in the Clowns," "La Vie en Rose" is lilting, and "I Need a Man," displays a vulnerable Jones. © Andrew Hamilton /TiVo
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Disco - Released October 28, 1985 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

An audio biography of Grace Jones, produced by Trevor Horn, it's a sonic treat along the lines of Yes's 90125 or Frankie Goes to Hollywood's first album (both produced by Horn). The music ranges from slick R&B runaway grooves to striking audio montages, interrupted occasionally by conversation about Jones's life. Serious ear candy. © Scott Bultman /TiVo
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Disco - Released May 4, 2015 | Universal Music Group International

The Island label reissued Grace Jones' first three albums as digital downloads in 2014, but The Disco Years, released the following year, brought the recordings back to physical life with compact disc and vinyl editions. Collectors were obviously in mind. The set contains Portfolio (1977), Fame (1978), and Muse (1979), all of which were recorded at Philadelphia's Sigma Sound with disco pioneer Tom Moulton as producer, in their entirety. Additionally, there are cuts from the single releases, including the 1977 nonalbum A-side "La Vie en Rose." The packaging is striking and colorful, joined by in-depth liner notes. While not as distinctive as her '80s work with Sly & Robbie and Trevor Horn, these recordings are undeniable -- the source of a half-dozen Top Ten Billboard disco hits, all rich with drama and finesse. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1978 | Universal Music Group International

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Pop - Released November 10, 2008 | Wall of Sound