Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD€12.49

Folk - Released March 12, 1965 | Sanctuary Records

While this album is not to be confused with Donovan's debut album (which was released under two different titles, Catch the Wind and What's Bin Did and What's Bin Hid), this particular collection is devoted to material from the same period in the singer/songwriter's career, his early years recording for Pye Records when his work was most strongly influenced by Bob Dylan's days as the king of poetic protest music. The tracks on Catch the Wind are a good bit different than the sunny pop-psychedelic sides Donovan would make his trademark a few years down the line, but one can hear glimmers of this style in the playful "Sunny Goodge Street" and the possible double meanings of "Candy Man." Otherwise, this is a solid (if not quite definitive) study of Donovan the Folkie, and if this work is less resonant than his subsequent pop recordings, it shows he was already a fine vocalist and a promising songwriter, as well as a keen judge of the work of others (his cover of Buffy Sainte-Marie's "Universal Soldier" was a well-deserved hit). Catch the Wind [Castle 2003 Collection] overlaps with a number of other collections of Donovan's early sides, but the track selection and audio are good enough that it would be a fine purchase for fans who are lacking the artist's formative works. © Mark Deming /TiVo
From
CD€12.49

Folk - Released October 22, 1965 | Transatlantic

Donovan's second album found the Scottish folkie in possession of his own voice, a style of earnest, occasionally mystical musings indebted neither to Woody Guthrie nor Bob Dylan. True, Fairytale's highlights -- "Sunny Goodge Street," "Jersey Thursday," and "The Summer Day Reflection Song" -- use a sense of impressionism pioneered by Dylan, but Donovan flipped Dylan's weariness on its head. His persona is the wistful hippie poet, continually moving on down the road, but never bitter about the past. The folkie "Colours," already a hit before the album's release, is also here (though without Donovan's harmonica). A few of his songs are inconsequential and tossed-off ("Oh Deed I Do," "Circus of Sour"), but a few of these ("Candy Man" especially) succeed too, thanks to Donovan's effervescent delivery. © John Bush /TiVo
From
CD€14.99

Folk - Released September 29, 2014 | Sanctuary Records

From
CD€9.99

Folk - Released December 1, 1967 | The state51 Conspiracy

Rock music's first two-LP box set, A Gift from a Flower to a Garden overcomes its original shortcomings and stands out as a prime artifact of the flower-power era that produced it. The music still seems a bit fey, and overall more spacy than the average Moody Blues album of this era, but the sheer range of subjects and influences make this a surprisingly rewarding work. Essentially two albums recorded simultaneously in the summer of 1967, the electric tracks include Jack Bruce among the session players. The acoustic tracks represent an attempt by Donovan to get back to his old sound and depart from the heavily electric singles ("Sunshine Superman," etc.) and albums he'd been doing -- it is folkier and bluesier (in an English folk sense) than much of his recent work. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
From
CD€14.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1998 | Castle Communications

From
CD€5.99

Folk - Released March 25, 2016 | Westmill

From
CD€14.99

Folk - Released August 26, 1966 | The state51 Conspiracy

Paced by the title track, one of Donovan's best singles, 1966's Sunshine Superman heralded the coming psychedelic age with a new world/old world bent: several ambitious psychedelic productions and a raft of wistful folk songs. Producer Mickie Most fashioned a new sound for the Scottish folksinger, a sparse, swinging, bass-heavy style perfectly complementing Donovan's enigmatic lyrics and delightfully skewed, beatnik delivery. The two side-openers, "Sunshine Superman" and "Season of the Witch," are easily the highlights of the album; the first is the quintessential bright summer sing-along, the second a chugging eve-of-destruction tale. The rest of Sunshine Superman is filled with lengthy, abstract, repetitive folk jams, perfect for lazy summer afternoons, but more problematic when close attention is paid. Accompanied by acoustic guitar and a chamber quartet, the second track, "Legend of a Girl Child Linda," plods on for nearly seven minutes, Donovan's hippie-dippie delivery rendering "lace" into "layyyzzz." After that notable low point, he performs much better, tingling a few spines with his enunciation on the ancient-sounding folksongs "Guinevere," "Three King Fishers," and "Ferris Wheel." Elsewhere, he salutes the Jefferson Airplane on "The Fat Angel" and fellow British folkie Bert Jansch on "Bert's Blues." Donovan's songs are quite solid, but Mickie Most's insistence on extroverted productions (it would grow even more pronounced with time) resulted in a collection of songs that sound good on their own but aren't very comfortable in context. © John Bush /TiVo
From
CD€9.99

Folk - Released December 12, 2006 | Synergie OMP

From
CD€5.99

Folk - Released March 21, 2019 | Empire of Sound

From
CD€5.99

Folk - Released November 25, 2012 | Carter Lane - OMiP

From
CD€9.99

Folk - Released July 3, 2011 | The Dave Cash Collection - OMP

From
CD€9.99

Folk - Released November 29, 2010 | Vanilla OMP

From
CD€0.79

Folk - Released April 16, 2021 | Large Door

From
CD€1.99

Folk - Released March 21, 2020 | Blue Mountain

From
CD€9.99

Folk - Released May 9, 2011 | The Dave Cash Collection - OMP