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€16.49
€11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 12, 2018 | Abstract Dragon

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Sombre and ragged, Wrong Creatures refines the genome of the trio from the City of Angels. The producer of the Bad Seeds is no stranger to their work. Nick Launay arrives at just the right time to help Peter Hayes, Robert Levon Been and Leah Shapiro get back on track. Since Robert's sudden loss of his father in 2010 and the release of the melancholy Spector At The Feast, BRMC have found themselves in troubled waters. Leah laid her mind bare in a brain operation in late 2014. It is hardly surprising, then, that Peter should be obsessed with death, or that this album has been two years in the making. Psychedelic rock tempered with the blues, with the spitting guitars on King Of Bones and Little Thing Gone Wild or Lexomil ballads like Echo, Haunt and Calling Them All Away, this eighth release from BRMC, motley but coherent, lacking the power of a Beat The Devil Tattoo, meets the standards of their pedigree. Filthy and tearful, but as sensual as ever. © CS/Qobuz
€11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 7, 2010 | V2 Cooperative Music

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club's 2010 album, Beat the Devil's Tattoo, finds the band splitting the difference between the rootsy Americana of 2005's Howl and the return to fuzzed-out noise rock that was 2007's Baby 81. Having once again parted ways with original drummer Nick Jago, bassist Robert Levon Been and guitarist Peter Hayes seem to have found a renewed creative spark with replacement drummer Leah Shapiro. Shapiro comes to the fold with strong noise rock credentials, having been a member of the punk-psych N.Y.C.-based Dead Combo and touring with the Raveonettes. With an overall sound that seems inspired by a searing mix of old-timey blues mixed with a hypodermic blast of melodic noise, there is a driving, wild-eyed intensity to many of the tracks on Beat the Devil's Tattoo. From the opening death-ballad title track and the gospel-meets-Madchester "Conscience Killer," the stoned robot funk of "War Machine," and the blissed-out acoustic folk ballad "Sweet Feeling," BRMC are in top form. But if you're looking for gutting-jet-engine lift-off, the cosmically epic, sanguine rock anthem "Bad Blood," with its repeated chorus of "I can see it in your eyes and now it's gone" is, like the rest of Beat the Devil's Tattoo, likely to grab you by the throat and leave its mark for some time to come. ~ Matt Collar
€8.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2008 | Virgin Catalogue

This L.A.-based band (originally hailing from San Francisco) came along just when they were needed most. This self-produced major-label debut boldly plunders a reverb-and-white noise course previously trampled underfoot by long-gone British bands of the late '80s and early '90s (the Jesus & Mary Chain, the Verve, Ride, the Stone Roses, etc.). It all sounds very British, on many levels, despite the fact that only one band member is an Englishman living in exile in the States. On some songs, however, the driving, over-amped guitars (often buzzing with "VU needles-in-red"-type feedback) and pounding drums have a swaggering primeval feel that rivals solid Detroit rock outfits, both old and new (including the Stooges and the Go, to name two). A few have dark, introspective lyrics, with subjects like impending death ("Rifles" at their heart, while others have a positive, more uplifting feel (cf. "Salvation"), but it's really the group's cohesive, solid production overall that captures a shoegazing, blustery rock vibe not heard for nearly a decade or more. Highlights abound on this astonishing disc, including the bitter opening salvo, "Love Burns," the diaphanous space pop of "Too Real," and the flurry of sawtooth guitar scree that is "Whatever Happened to My Rock n' Roll (Punk Song)," a track recalling the manic intensity of the Stooges circa Fun House. ~ Bryan Thomas
€13.49

Rock - Released May 20, 2016 | The Echo Label Limited

Since the release of Take Them On, On Your Own in 2003, things were tumultuous for Black Rebel Motorcycle Club. They were unceremoniously dropped by Virgin in a cloud of bad feeling. They lost their drummer. They bounced back and signed with RCA. They welcomed back their drummer. Somewhere in the middle of all this they completely revamped their sound. In fact, their first record for RCA, 2005's Howl, sounds like the work of an entirely different group. Gone are the insistent tempos, the snarling vocals, and the sheets of guitar noise. Gone is the hostile and often belligerent pose of the first two albums. Gone is the influence of noise rock bands like the Velvet Underground and the Jesus and Mary Chain. The band has embraced classic American music, namely country, blues, and gospel. It's dramatically expanded its sound to the point where you wonder if the albums that preceded this were some kind of reductionist prank. The band has a light touch and sense of drama and arrangement here that seems to have come out of the blue. (Check the credit to T-Bone Burnett for "additional recording assistance" for a clue, though.) In fact, the first thing you hear on the album is enough to have you checking to make sure the disc isn't defective: the multi-tracked vocals of Peter Hayes and Robert Levon Been emulating a gospel choir at the beginning of "Shuffle Your Feet," a rollicking slice of front-porch country complete with strumming acoustic guitars, harmonica, handclaps, and slide. It's no fluke because for the most part the album that follows is built on similarly relaxed, acoustic, and loose underpinnings. Tracks like "Still Suspicion Holds You Tight," "Devil's Waiting" (which features the return of the multi-tracked choir), and "Complicated Situation" have a lightness and ease that they previously could never have achieved. Other songs benefit from the expansion of sound too: "Weight of the World" has an epic, reaching-for-the-stars feel not a million miles from Coldplay and their followers (though it has more gritty soul than that), while "Howl"'s fuzz chamber sound is the closest thing to their previous work, but the circus organ, sleigh bells, and dynamics give the song color where it would have been shades of gray. On these songs and elsewhere the vocals are much more a part of the sound now as they are more upfront and impassioned. Both Hayes and Been have fine voices that are well suited to their new direction, sincere and gritty but never strained. Along with a new sound BRMC seem to have found religion too, as nearly half the songs revolve around God, the Devil, sin, and salvation. "Restless Sinner" and "Gospel Song" (which shows that the band hasn't completely abandoned its old influences, as the song is filtered closely through Spaceman 3's interpretation of gospel) are the most obvious manifestation of this new focus, but much of the record has the exuberance and weight of a band wrestling with heavy emotions. Well, that but without being quite as boring as it sounds. Of course, boredom is relative and by the end of the record you may find yourself wondering whatever happened to your rock & roll. You may feel betrayed by their sudden shift away from noise and danger, confused by the sudden change from a band of sulky post-teens with sex and danger on their minds to questioning (though still young) adults looking for salvation. Understandable, no question. If you want your rock dirty, loud, and dangerous (though BRMC were only halfway believable when that was their image), you had better look somewhere else. If you want it thoughtful and passionate but still alive and realistic, then give Howl a chance. BRMC have grown up and grown interesting. ~ Tim Sendra
€13.99

Rock - Released June 8, 2015 | Abstract Dragon

Recorded at Theatre Trianon in Paris, France, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club's 2015 concert DVD and album Live in Paris showcases the trio live during their sold-out 2014 European tour. Known for their heavy blues, folk, and punk-influenced sound and dramatic live shows, BRMC certainly live up to expectations with this superbly crafted concert film. Although influenced by the distortion-heavy, atmospheric approach of bands like the Jesus and Mary Chain and the Velvet Underground, BRMC have built a career on making their own brand of hard-hitting rock. And while there is certainly plenty of guitar bombast here, Live in Paris also showcases the group's talent for sensitive group dynamics and emotionally resonant balladry, as on the elegiac and uplifting "Sometimes the Light." This is a cathartic live show that kicks off with the moody "Fire Walker" and includes such BRMC fan favorites as "Teenage Disease," "Beat the Devil's Tattoo," "Spread Your Love," "Whatever Happened to My Rock 'n' Roll (Punk Song)," and many others. Also featured is the band's cover of the Call's "Let the Day Begin," an especially potent moment as BRMC lead singer/bassist Robert Levon Been is the son of late Call vocalist Michael Been (who died in 2010 while on tour with BRMC). Also included with the DVD/two-CD package of Live in Paris is the behind-the-scenes documentary 33.3% directed by Yana Amur. Ultimately, with Live in Paris, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club have crafted a moving, cinematic concert experience. ~ Matt Collar
€11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 18, 2013 | V2 Cooperative Music

With 2010's superb Beat the Devil's Tattoo, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club found a balance between their muscular, fuzzed-out noise rock and rootsy if no less punk-inspired take on American blues and country. The trio, now featuring singer/bassist Robert Levon Been, singer/guitarist Peter Hayes, and drummer Leah Shapiro (who joined for Devil's Tattoo), seemed to have matured into a fully realized version of its younger self. BRMC's seventh studio album, 2013's Specter at the Feast, takes this musical maturation even further, as the band delves into a moody, sustained, and long-form dream pop aesthetic. Much of this introspection is most likely inspired by the loss of Robert Been's father, the Call frontman Michael Been, who suffered a heart attack and died backstage at the 2010 Pukkelpop Festival in Belgium. As BRMC's touring soundman, Been was an invaluable source for both creative and professional advice, as well as an inspiring, loving force in the group's life. The loss, understandably, hit BRMC hard and, purportedly, they wondered if they could continue to make music without him. Thankfully, they ultimately decided that they could, and if the music on Specter at the Feast is any indication, they became a stronger, deeper, more commanding band for the experience. Michael's presence permeates all of the songs on Specter at the Feast, with lyrics that clearly find the band toiling with the loss. On "Returning," Robert sings, "A part of you is ending, a part of you holds on," and later, "But you must leave and not turn back, knowing what you hold/How much time have we got left, it's killing us, but carries us on...carries us all." However, the album isn't solely an introspective one. On the contrary, cuts like the bluesy "Hate the Taste" and the defiant "Teenage Disease" prove that BRMC have lost none of their rock & roll snarl. That said, the album, which is dedicated to Michael's memory, will most likely stand as the band's most bittersweet. Perhaps the best example of this is BRMC's cover of the Call's 1989 hit, "Let the Day Begin." Poignant yet triumphant and joyful in tone, the cover, as with all of Specter at the Feast, stands as both a heartfelt tribute to their bandmate and a rallying cry for moving forward. ~ Matt Collar
€13.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2007 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

After completely (and successfully) rehauling their sound for 2005's Howl, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club shelved their low-key Americana leanings, reburied their roots music influences, and retreated to a new version of their old, noisy sound. Baby 81 is a big rock record with walls of crunchy guitars, thundering drums, and lots of volume that sounds like a cross between Oasis and the Jesus and Mary Chain at their most conventional. It's also an over-polished, over-thought, and under-inspired record that forsakes everything good that the group accomplished on Howl (subtlety, emotion weight, solid songcraft) in favor of stale melodies, vacant lyrics, and clichéd bad-boy rock & roll posturing. Songs like "666 Conducer," "Berlin" (which is saddled with the howlingly bad chorus "Suicide's easy/What happened to the revolution?"), the slick new wave bandwagon-hopper "American X," and the clunky "Lien on Your Dreams" are like paint-by-numbers rockers that even JAMC would set aside as too bland. The Mary Chain comparison is blindingly obvious, but maybe a bit unfair to the Reid brothers; even at their most generic, they always had the evil force of their personalities to help sell their pose, but BRMC has no personality to fall back on. This album slinks past in an embarrassing haze of forgettable songs and missed opportunities. Even the couple of tunes that start off promising, like the moody "All You Do Is Talk" or "Am I Only" (which teases by opening with a quiet acoustic guitar passage), are ruined by the hackneyed production and the overall tired, desperate feeling that pervades the album. After Howl, it seemed like the group was poised to make some very good, honest-sounding records. Instead they have succumbed to an ill-fated attempt to get back in the rock & roll game, and it's a painfully disappointing artistic failure. ~ Tim Sendra
€13.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2008 | Virgin Catalogue

€1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released January 5, 2018 | Abstract Dragon

€1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released November 20, 2017 | Abstract Dragon

€9.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2001 | Virgin Records

This L.A.-based band (originally hailing from San Francisco) came along just when they were needed most. This self-produced major-label debut boldly plunders a reverb-and-white noise course previously trampled underfoot by long-gone British bands of the late '80s and early '90s (the Jesus & Mary Chain, the Verve, Ride, the Stone Roses, etc.). It all sounds very British, on many levels, despite the fact that only one band member is an Englishman living in exile in the States. On some songs, however, the driving, over-amped guitars (often buzzing with "VU needles-in-red"-type feedback) and pounding drums have a swaggering primeval feel that rivals solid Detroit rock outfits, both old and new (including the Stooges and the Go, to name two). A few have dark, introspective lyrics, with subjects like impending death ("Rifles" at their heart, while others have a positive, more uplifting feel (cf. "Salvation"), but it's really the group's cohesive, solid production overall that captures a shoegazing, blustery rock vibe not heard for nearly a decade or more. Highlights abound on this astonishing disc, including the bitter opening salvo, "Love Burns," the diaphanous space pop of "Too Real," and the flurry of sawtooth guitar scree that is "Whatever Happened to My Rock n' Roll (Punk Song)," a track recalling the manic intensity of the Stooges circa Fun House. ~ Bryan Thomas
€1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released November 6, 2017 | Abstract Dragon

€1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released September 13, 2017 | Abstract Dragon

€13.99

Rock - Released September 1, 2003 | Capitol Records, LLC

€1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released October 23, 2017 | Abstract Dragon

€1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released February 28, 2010 | V2 Cooperative Music

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club's 2010 album, Beat the Devil's Tattoo, finds the band splitting the difference between the rootsy Americana of 2005's Howl and the return to fuzzed-out noise rock that was 2007's Baby 81. Having once again parted ways with original drummer Nick Jago, bassist Robert Levon Been and guitarist Peter Hayes seem to have found a renewed creative spark with replacement drummer Leah Shapiro. Shapiro comes to the fold with strong noise rock credentials, having been a member of the punk-psych N.Y.C.-based Dead Combo and touring with the Raveonettes. With an overall sound that seems inspired by a searing mix of old-timey blues mixed with a hypodermic blast of melodic noise, there is a driving, wild-eyed intensity to many of the tracks on Beat the Devil's Tattoo. From the opening death-ballad title track and the gospel-meets-Madchester "Conscience Killer," the stoned robot funk of "War Machine," and the blissed-out acoustic folk ballad "Sweet Feeling," BRMC are in top form. But if you're looking for gutting-jet-engine lift-off, the cosmically epic, sanguine rock anthem "Bad Blood," with its repeated chorus of "I can see it in your eyes and now it's gone" is, like the rest of Beat the Devil's Tattoo, likely to grab you by the throat and leave its mark for some time to come. ~ Matt Collar
€2.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2007 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

€5.49

Alternative & Indie - Released January 7, 2002 | 16 Inch Records, Under exclusive licens to Universal Music AB

€13.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2007 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

After completely (and successfully) rehauling their sound for 2005's Howl, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club shelved their low-key Americana leanings, reburied their roots music influences, and retreated to a new version of their old, noisy sound. Baby 81 is a big rock record with walls of crunchy guitars, thundering drums, and lots of volume that sounds like a cross between Oasis and the Jesus and Mary Chain at their most conventional. It's also an over-polished, over-thought, and under-inspired record that forsakes everything good that the group accomplished on Howl (subtlety, emotion weight, solid songcraft) in favor of stale melodies, vacant lyrics, and clichéd bad-boy rock & roll posturing. Songs like "666 Conducer," "Berlin" (which is saddled with the howlingly bad chorus "Suicide's easy/What happened to the revolution?"), the slick new wave bandwagon-hopper "American X," and the clunky "Lien on Your Dreams" are like paint-by-numbers rockers that even JAMC would set aside as too bland. The Mary Chain comparison is blindingly obvious, but maybe a bit unfair to the Reid brothers; even at their most generic, they always had the evil force of their personalities to help sell their pose, but BRMC has no personality to fall back on. This album slinks past in an embarrassing haze of forgettable songs and missed opportunities. Even the couple of tunes that start off promising, like the moody "All You Do Is Talk" or "Am I Only" (which teases by opening with a quiet acoustic guitar passage), are ruined by the hackneyed production and the overall tired, desperate feeling that pervades the album. After Howl, it seemed like the group was poised to make some very good, honest-sounding records. Instead they have succumbed to an ill-fated attempt to get back in the rock & roll game, and it's a painfully disappointing artistic failure. ~ Tim Sendra
€2.29

Rock - Released September 1, 2016 | The Echo Label Limited