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Electronic - Released August 3, 2011 | Mute

Distinctions 5/6 de Magic - Sélection Les Inrocks
When accomplished electronic music producers speak of making proper songs instead of tracks -- most ominously, there’s the one-two punch of “Dance music bores me now” and “I’m getting a band together” -- it’s usually a good time to tune out. While Sascha Ring is guilty of all three and has backed it up with The Devil’s Walk, an album completely divorced from the dancefloor and glitch/IDM, the shift has been gradual, not abrupt, and he happens to be composing some of the most evocative, finely detailed music of his decade-long career. No need to think back to the most organic song on 2007’s Walls, the sapless and malformed “Over and Over,” and prepare for more of the same; these songs, sometimes built on little more than strings, soft keyboard tones, and supple textures, are sturdy and fully developed. All the vocalists fall into place with solemn yet expressive performances, enhancing productions that straddle heartache and ecstasy. It’s the type of album that can be enjoyed on the surface, as pleasant background listening, or as a deeply immersive experience. Anyone who enjoys it should seek the output of Ring collaborator Joshua Eustis' Telefon Tel Aviv, especially 2009’s Immolate Yourself. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Electronic - Released February 18, 2013 | Mute

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Sebastian Hartmann tapped Sascha Ring, aka Apparat, to provide music for his theatrical adaptation of Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace. For four weeks, Ring and a 30-piece group of instrumentalists, including close associates Christoph Hartmann and Philipp Timm, created the material and rehearsed in an abandoned factory building. Up to the conclusion of the production, there was no intent to release the music in any form, but Ring, Hartmann, and Timm opted to shape the performances into an Apparat album. It flows like one, beginning with a short intro of strings that morphs into threatening drones before switching between a succession of predominantly subdued instrumentals and more involved (i.e., musical) pieces with additional percussion. With the exception of "LightOn," Ring's prickly textures and crunchy beats are absent; most of the program certainly could be re-purposed as a film score. Even though the music apparently went through a significant studio process, it's difficult to shake the feeling that it would be preferable to hear the original compositions while witnessing the production. The two full-blown songs featuring vocals -- emotive and pained in a fashion that's very adult contemporary indie -- don't seem to bear the weight of the work that inspired its making. Regardless, this is a sporadically thrilling and fascinating part of the Apparat discography. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Electronic - Released March 22, 2019 | Mute

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Film Soundtracks - Released May 1, 2020 | It's Complicated Records

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Electronic - Released May 25, 2007 | Shitkatapult

Having made a considerable splash with the Ellen Allien collaboration Orchestra of Bubbles, Apparat returned to his own path with Walls, a remarkable album that ranks as his best yet. Beginning with the gentle string and vibes beats of "Not a Number" -- which in its own melancholy way, combined with the title, suddenly sounds like one of the most humanistic songs yet recorded, passionate in its elegant sorrow -- Walls takes a simultaneously familiar and unsettled path. While the continuing impact of disparate strands of music -- the fallout of My Bloody Valentine and its many imitators, the electronic obsessions of Warp, the stadium-ready melancholy of early Radiohead and its own horde of followers -- has resulted in a 21st century computer music of crushed sorrow; on Walls, Apparat transcends the downbeat limitations of the incipient form with astonishing grace. Hearing how what could be a standard filter-house volume build in "Limelight" becomes a fierce trap for a voice barely understandable, or how the post-Jeff Buckley/Thom Yorke woundedly sweet vocal on "Arcadia" actually means something working alongside the busily frenetic beats make the listener regard familiar approaches in a sudden new light. Meantime, "You Don't Know Me," which appears towards the album's conclusion, might actually be the best song on it. While there are a lot of songs that could be described as soundtracking a nonexistent film, this actually feels like it, strings and a handclap beat creating a pitch-perfect atmosphere to the end of a romantic movie. Raz Ohara's various vocal appearances throughout are nice additions but the highlight is "Hold On," where his perfectly in-the-moment R&B style contrasts the squelching bass and nervous but righteous groove to a T. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released June 12, 2020 | It's Complicated Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released May 22, 2020 | It's Complicated Records

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"[T]hese compositions are still capable of leaving a deep impact." © TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released July 10, 2020 | It's Complicated Records

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Electronic - Released October 23, 2015 | Shitkatapult

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Electronic - Released January 26, 2018 | Mute

Electronic - Released October 25, 2010 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released August 25, 2003 | Shitkatapult

You have to give a nod of the head to Apparat for Duplex. In a year when the market has been flooded with glitch madness, Apparat (aka Sascha Ring) offers up a full length that stands apart from most in terms of sheer quality. Duplex is melodic and emotional like Telefon Tel Aviv, but without the cleanliness for which TTA is known. This is dirty and raw without all of the digital fuss that most IDM producers toil long and hard to achieve, and Apparat pulls it off with deceptive simplicity. Digital mosquitoes flickering and fluttering throughout the opening track ("Granular Bastard") and haunting vocals that recall classic Peter Gabriel on "Contradiction" help to drive home that this is going to be anything but predictable. It's glitchy, but doesn't subscribe to many of the basic tenets that plague the glitch/microhouse subgenres, and listening to the album in its entirety can be an exhilarating and inspiring listen, or a completely exhausting one depending on your state of mind before popping the CD in the tray. But either way, Duplex stirs the gamut of emotions so deeply and honestly that it's hard to walk away and not feel something. And after all, isn't that what of the core principles music (and art) are supposed to provide? © Rob Theakston /TiVo
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Electronic - Released January 22, 2019 | Mute

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Electronic - Released January 21, 2005 | Shitkatapult

Silizium is as long as an album, but there are nearly as many remixes as original mixes, so it appears to be designed more like an EP of stray tracks or a brief compilation. It's neither. Instead, the first five tracks work together as a single piece. For this part of the disc, recorded for a John Peel session, producer Sascha Ring is joined by vocalist Raz O'Hara as well as a cellist, a violinist, and a clarinetist. As a whole, it brings Apparat closer to the kind of emotionally incisive chamber IDM nearly perfected by Telefon Tel Aviv on Map of What Is Effortless. It's only fitting that Telefon Tel Aviv are brought in to perform one of the remixes, and their spin on "Komponent" isn't radically different, though it is just as effective. Bus, Rechenzentrum, and Ring provide the other alternates. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Electronic - Released January 21, 2005 | Shitkatapult

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Electronic - Released April 4, 2008 | Shitkatapult

"Apparat's own remixes level out the material at his disposal without paving over or obliterating it, dicing and recoating the tracks in his own image and yet, in so doing, lending them a sober, minimal Techno dignity..." © TiVo
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Electronic - Released August 29, 2019 | Mute

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Dance - Released October 4, 2019 | Mute

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Experimental - Released August 20, 2001 | Shitkatapult

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Electronic - Released April 25, 2019 | Mute

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