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Hard Rock - Released July 31, 2015 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Weighing in at 15 CDs, The Studio Albums 1969-1983 is a hefty box set but, at $85, it is relatively affordable considering that it contains everything Alice Cooper -- both the band and the man -- recorded at Straight and Warner. Whatever bonus material attached to CD reissues over the years has been stripped away -- nothing from the 2001 deluxe edition of Billion Dollar Babies, then -- and there are no new remasters of the albums, but this set isn't bare bones. The mini-LP replicas contain a few inserts carried over from the vinyl and, more importantly, those early Straight Records are present, which is good because they were out of print for a while. Not everything here is great -- he did have a rough patch in the late '70s and early '80s -- but it's all interesting, and it's especially nice to be able to get the entire catalog so easily and cheaply. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Hard Rock - Released June 26, 2001 | Rhino Atlantic

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Hard Rock - Released March 27, 2001 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Metal - Released February 26, 2021 | earMUSIC

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What do you do when you're a 73-year-old shock rocker in a world where rock doesn't shock but you still have gas in the tank? Relive the glory days. Alice Cooper's 28th album and first since 2017's Paranormal is an ode to the city where Alice got his start as one of the godfathers of hard rock. It was recorded with longtime producer Bob Ezrin, features players from Motor City legends like the MC5 and The Detroit Wheels, and attempts to recapture the grimy magic of his once-subversive project's inception in the early '70s. The stakes couldn't be lower for new Alice Cooper music in 2021, and the record sees him acknowledge that and then choose to rock out anyways for himself and whoever's listening. Even at 73, Alice is still a charismatic vocalist who sounds best when he's knee-deep in dirt-kicking blues-rock riffs, like on "Go Man Go," "Sister Anne," and the Sabbathy "East Side Story." Unlike '90s acolytes like Rob Zombie and Marilyn Manson, Cooper's strain of shock was always more silly than scary, and those sensibilities have aged nicely as the last few decades of culture have drained all the transgression out of his schtick. "Hail Mary" is a hammy hard-rock song about a woman who certainly doesn't invoke Virgin qualities, and when Cooper self-deprecatingly groans, "I'm dumb but even sometimes losers win," you can practically see his toothy grin materalize before you. Forty years ago, you would've been hard-pressed to see a critic describe Alice Cooper as comfort food, but now his nostalgically endearing antics have a warm, Grandpa-esque quality to them. The inoffensively awkward swerves into funk ("$1000 High Heel Shoes") and industrial ("Wonderful World") are goofy but easily forgivable. Other gimmicky tracks like "Detroit City 2021," a lovably dated-sounding anthem, and "I Hate You," a song where each band member playfully roasts the others with schoolyard taunts, find the sweet-spot between shlocky and unapologetically fun. The only track on the record that really doesn't work is the sunny power-pop song "Our Love Will Change the World," which is so bright and uplifting that it's unclear whether Cooper is being cheeky or earnest. The grungey power-ballad, "Don't Give Up," is a well-intentioned fight song for COVID-era resilience, but Cooper's spoken-word plug for the Suicide Prevention Hotline feels out of sorts on an album with a burning building and blood-red lettering on its cover art. At the end of the day, Detroit Stories doesn't really have all that much to say about its namesake and most of the songs lack the narrative focus one would associate with a story, but that's OK. Just hearing Alice Cooper do his thing, as he's done with remarkable consistency for over 50 years, is good enough. © Eli Enis/Qobuz
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Hard Rock - Released September 13, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop/Rock - Released July 25, 1989 | Epic

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Alice Cooper hadn't had a hugely successful album in over a decade when, in 1989, he teamed up with Bon Jovi producer Desmond Child for Trash -- a highly slick and commercial yet edgy pop-metal effort that temporarily restored him to the charts in a big way. Fueled by the irresistible hit single "Poison," the album temporarily gave back to Cooper the type of visibility he deserved. There's nothing shocking here, and Cooper's ability to generate controversy had long since faded. But while the escapist Trash -- which was clearly aimed at the Mötley Crüe/Guns N' Roses crowd -- may not be the most challenging album of Cooper's career, and isn't in a class with School's Out or Billion Dollar Babies, it's fun and quite enjoyable. And it was great to see the long-neglected Cooper on MTV next to so many of the '80s rockers he had influenced. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Pop - Released December 18, 2006 | Rhino

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Hard Rock - Released July 28, 2017 | earMUSIC

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A few months after his 70th birthday, Alice Cooper is not looking forward to a retirement home. Detroit's prince of darkness is full of fire and brimstone throughout his album Paranormal. Recorded in Nashville with his old collaborator, producer Bob Ezrin, this 27th studio album from the wildest of the old masters of hard rock was in part written with several original members of his group, including Neal Smith, Dennis Dunaway and Michael Bruce, but also prestigious guests like Larry Mullen, U2's drummer, Billy Gibbons, guitarist with ZZ Top, or Roger Glover, the Deep Purple bassist. As ever with Alice Cooper, the guitar riffs attack the ears, the artist's pen tackles themes as diverse as the devil (of course) but also nightmares and transgender issues. A record of quality. © CM/Qobuz
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Pop/Rock - Released July 2, 1991 | Epic

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Unfortunately, the return to the high end of the charts that Alice Cooper enjoyed with 1989's Trash was short-lived. On his similar follow-up -- another slick pop-metal effort -- Cooper no longer had the input of hit producer/songwriter Desmond Child, and worked with Peter Collins instead. The result is an album that, although generally enjoyable and far from bad, isn't essential. The CD's more memorable offerings include the clever and amusing "Feed My Frankenstein," the dramatic "Love's a Loaded Gun," and the inspired title song -- which admonishes rockers not to self-destruct. But despite its strong points, Hey Stoopid is for only Cooper's more devoted followers. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Pop - Released February 8, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Released January 29, 2007 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Metal - Released August 17, 2018 | earMUSIC

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A Paranormal Evening at the Olympia Paris consists of 18 live tracks from the rock legend's performance at the Olympia in Paris in 2017. The record includes some of Cooper's best and most well-loved tracks like "School's Out," "No More Mr. Nice Guy," and "Poison." The live album features touring musicians Tommy Henriksen, Nita Strauss, and Ryan Roxie. © Bekki Bemrose /TiVo
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Hard Rock - Released July 18, 2000 | Rhino - Warner Records

Rhino's Mascara & Monsters presents a more concise alternative to 1999's mammoth, four-disc set The Life & Crimes of Alice Cooper. Like the box set, this album delivers digitally remastered versions of 22 of Cooper's best-known rock anthems, including "Eighteen," "School's Out," "Billion Dollar Babies," "Poison," and "Welcome to My Nightmare." Just thorough enough to please both casual fans and diehards, Mascara & Monsters: The Best of Alice Cooper is the most complete retrospective available on one disc. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released June 3, 1994 | Epic

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Though Alice Cooper's 1989 comeback gave him his first hit album in over a decade, the Trash record left some diehard fans disappointed, as did 1991's Hey Stoopid. Many listeners felt that Cooper had sold himself short, now completely focusing on sleazy sexual anthems, making him just another face in the heavy metal crowd. By the time The Last Temptation was released in 1994, the hair band fad that had fueled Cooper's return was dead, and Cooper was obviously aware of its downfall -- the album sounds almost nothing like its two predecessors. Instead of relating to such albums as Motley Crue's Dr. Feelgood, Last Temptation seems more similar to Ozzy Osbourne's No More Tears. Thematically, the record returns to mostly conceptual songs, such as "Nothing's Free," "You're My Temptation," and "Cleansed by Fire." Though the album still has a few goofy interruptions, such anthems as "Lost in America" nonetheless boast more originality than anything off of Hey Stoopid or Trash. Far surpassing anything Cooper recorded in almost 20 years, The Last Temptation is unquestionably some of his best work. © Barry Weber /TiVo
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Rock - Released March 16, 2018 | Epic - Legacy

The question that everyone is asking obviously is: who needs a new compilation from the master of shock rock? Even if more have been released since the first Greatest Hits in 1974 than any of us can count, statistically, there is still a huge majority of people on this planet that doesn’t own a single one of his albums or even never once listened to him. So the question should rather be: can one start their initiation with this new double album? The answer is both yes and no. As indicated by the “Epic Years” label, this best-of only covers the era during which Alice Cooper was under contract with the powerful American label. It was a highly prosperous period that started in 1989 with the monumental Trash, with its procession of hits that were perfectly calibrated for FM radios (Poison, Bed of Nails House on Fire, Only My Heart Talkin) and a handful of others that belong to the category of Cooperian classics (Spark in the Dark, Trash, Hell Is Living Without You, I’m Your Gun). This album, which sold more than 2 million copies, completely relaunched Cooper’s career, a fact that surprised even the artist: “There are kids who come up to me on the street who think Trash is my first album.” But it also owed its popularity to the presence of guest stars, including almost all the members of Aerosmith (Steven Tyler, Joe Perry, Tom Hamilton and Joey Kramer), Jon Bon Jovi and his former accomplice Richie Sambora and Steve Lukather (Toto)… But eight tracks out of ten taken from Trash is either excessive or petty.Without being a failure, far from it, the following album didn’t enjoy the same success, despite using the same formula—if only more ambitious—with even more prestigious guests (Ozzy Osbourne, Slash, Joe Satriani, Steve Vai and two members from Mötley Crüe, Nikki Sixx and Mick Mars…). And yet, the entirety of its content was kept here. One track was put aside from the excellent The Last Temptation, but the collaborations with Chris Cornell were fortunately kept (Stolen Prayer and Unholly War). To justify despite all of that the “essential” label that could have seemed a bit excessive, three classics have been taken from the live A Fistful of Alice, and pretty great at that: No More Mr. Nice Guy, Billion Dollar Babies and School’s Out, but only the latter benefits from a true guest, Sammy Hagar, while Rob Zombie and Slash had also come to play with Cooper on stage for other tracks. A few less studio tracks in favor of more pieces coming from this well-made live would probably have been a more judicious choice. But if we had to give a clear answer to the question asked above, we would lean toward the affirmative. You can absolutely start with this album, since it corresponds to the years during which there was not much to throw away in Cooper’s production. But you will quickly need to explore further if you want to really know the artist… © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
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Hard Rock - Released February 27, 2007 | Rhino - Warner Records

From the Inside was hardly Alice Cooper's best-selling or most accessible album. An intensely personal account of his recovery from substance abuse, it tends to be one of his most abstract efforts and lacks the immediacy of Billion Dollar Babies, Welcome to My Nightmare, or Alice Cooper Goes to Hell. There are no rock anthems here à la "School's Out" or "18" and no celebrations of shock value like "I Love the Dead" or "The Black Widow." Instead, the singer honestly documents the way he confronted his demons and emerged victorious. Sometimes, this introspective effort is too self-indulgent and intellectual for its own good, but at its best as on "How You Gonna See Me Now", From the Inside is as riveting as it in inspiring. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Hard Rock - Released September 13, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Hard Rock - Released February 27, 2007 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Hard Rock - Released September 13, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

With the future of the original Alice Cooper band in doubt by mid-1974 (they would soon break up for good with Alice going solo), Warner Bros. decided to issue a best-of compilation entitled Greatest Hits. If you're a newcomer to Alice, this 12-track compilation is a must-hear -- all the selections are exceptional. While many have chosen to focus primarily on Cooper's theatrics over the years, the original bandmembers were indeed supreme rock songwriters; such anthems as "I'm Eighteen," "Under My Wheels," "School's Out," and "No More Mr. Nice Guy" are unquestionably among the finest hard rock tracks of all time. And the other selections prove to be just as strong -- "Is It My Body," "Desperado," "Be My Lover," "Elected," "Billion Dollar Babies," and "Muscle of Love" are all outstanding as well. The only criticism of the original release is that the collection overlooked the band's key album tracks never issued as singles. © Greg Prato /TiVo
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Rock - Released May 29, 2006 | Mercury Studios