Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

System Of A Down - Toxicity

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

Toxicity

System Of A Down

Available in
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

System of a Down's 1998 debut was initially overlooked by the mainstream hard rock audience, as well as the specialized press. But heavy metal cognoscenti in both camps quickly realized that in their hands was a potentially crucial stepping stone for the future development of heavy metal. Sure enough, so challenging and groundbreaking were its contents that the album soared over most everyone's unsuspecting heads, its eventual gold sales status only achieved via Columbia Records' massive promotional muscle and nearly three years of intensive touring on the band's part. Consequently, early believers were pleasantly surprised when 2001's long awaited follow-up, Toxicity met with instant popular acceptance, skyrocketing up the charts toward multi-platinum success. Yet, for the most part, it also managed to retained SOAD's unorthodox signature sound: so-called "nu-metal" uniquely infused with remarkable originality, including angular riffs, jagged rhythms, and oblique lyrics splattered all over the place. Like its predecessor, Toxicity seems utterly chaotic upon first listen, but things quickly begin falling into place, thanks to a number of small refinements, not least of which is a more generous melody, obviously pre-meditated, but rarely overdone. In turn, this immediacy greatly improved the album's chances at radio -- case in point, first single "Chop Suey!," a track so potent not even September 11, nor mainstream radio's ensuing self-imposed, politically correct attempt at self-censorship, could tear from the airwaves (despite its none-too-discreet lyrics about suicide), the song's surprising success was reminiscent of another left-field hit from a decade earlier, Faith No More's "Epic" (hear its piano-led outro for proof). And sure enough, from the unexpected false starts of "Prison Song" to the relatively mellow conclusion, the band's heightened commercial sensibility continues to joust with their inherently quirky songwriting. The excellent title track, "Forest," and "Science" are among the most accessible standouts from an incredibly diverse set, the likes of which SOAD's inferior nu-metal peers could only hope to emulate. Lyrically, it's simply no contest. Whether tackling typical rock subject matter like drug abuse ("Needles") and groupies ("Psycho"), or embarking on inscrutable Dadaist gems like "Jet Pilot" and "Shimmy," co-songwriters Daron Malakian and Serj Tankain sound like are the bastard children of Frank Zappa and Slayer. And while sub-Rage Against the Machine political invective (unfairly attributed to their Armenian heritage) remains an integral part of the band's creative makeup (e.g. "Deer Dance," "Atwa"), Toxicity's approach is much more cautious in this regard than that of their incendiary debut. In conclusion, when a band takes this many left turns, you'd expect them to start going in circles sooner rather than later, but this is not the case with System of a Down. Hands down one of 2001's top metal releases, Toxicity may well prove to be a lasting heavy metal classic to boot.
© Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo

More info

Toxicity

System Of A Down

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

Copy the following link to share it

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 70 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 70 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

1
Toxicity
00:03:39

System Of A Down, Associated Performer, Main Artist, Associated Performer - Rick Rubin and Daron Malakian, Producer - Shavo Odadjian, Composer - Arto Tuncboyaciyian - Daron Malakian, Composer, Producer - Serj Tankian, Co-Producer, Lyricist - Rick Rubin, Piano - Greg Collins, Engineer - Darren Mora, Assistant Engineer, Engineer - Al Sanderson, Assistant Engineer - Ryan McCormick, Assistant Engineer - Jim Champagne, Assistant Engineer - ANDY WALLACE, Mixing Engineer - Rich Balmer, Mixing Engineer - David Schiffman, Recording Engineer

(P) 2001 Columbia Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment. With American Recordings, LLC.

2
Marmalade Explicit Version
00:02:59

System Of A Down, Associated Performer, Main Artist, Associated Performer - Malakian, Composer - Rick Rubin, Piano - RICK RUBIN With System Of A Down, Producer - Tankian, Lyricist - Dino Paredes - Sam Wick - Sylvia Massy, Engineer - Greg Fidelman, Assistant Engineer, Engineer - Sam Storey, Assistant Engineer - Nick Raskulinecz, Assistant Engineer - D. SARDY, Mixing Engineer, Recording Engineer - James Saez, Mixing Engineer - Greg Gordon, Mixing Engineer - Andy Haller, Mixing Engineer - Bryan Davis, Mixing Engineer - Vlado Meller, Mastering Engineer

(P) 1999 American Recording Company, LLC

3
Metro
00:03:00

System Of A Down, Associated Performer, Main Artist, Associated Performer - D. SARDY, Mixing Engineer, Producer - John Crawford, Composer, Lyricist - Juan Garcia, Mixing Engineer - Greg Gordon, Recording Engineer

(P) 2000 Columbia Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment. With American Recordings, LLC.

Album Description

System of a Down's 1998 debut was initially overlooked by the mainstream hard rock audience, as well as the specialized press. But heavy metal cognoscenti in both camps quickly realized that in their hands was a potentially crucial stepping stone for the future development of heavy metal. Sure enough, so challenging and groundbreaking were its contents that the album soared over most everyone's unsuspecting heads, its eventual gold sales status only achieved via Columbia Records' massive promotional muscle and nearly three years of intensive touring on the band's part. Consequently, early believers were pleasantly surprised when 2001's long awaited follow-up, Toxicity met with instant popular acceptance, skyrocketing up the charts toward multi-platinum success. Yet, for the most part, it also managed to retained SOAD's unorthodox signature sound: so-called "nu-metal" uniquely infused with remarkable originality, including angular riffs, jagged rhythms, and oblique lyrics splattered all over the place. Like its predecessor, Toxicity seems utterly chaotic upon first listen, but things quickly begin falling into place, thanks to a number of small refinements, not least of which is a more generous melody, obviously pre-meditated, but rarely overdone. In turn, this immediacy greatly improved the album's chances at radio -- case in point, first single "Chop Suey!," a track so potent not even September 11, nor mainstream radio's ensuing self-imposed, politically correct attempt at self-censorship, could tear from the airwaves (despite its none-too-discreet lyrics about suicide), the song's surprising success was reminiscent of another left-field hit from a decade earlier, Faith No More's "Epic" (hear its piano-led outro for proof). And sure enough, from the unexpected false starts of "Prison Song" to the relatively mellow conclusion, the band's heightened commercial sensibility continues to joust with their inherently quirky songwriting. The excellent title track, "Forest," and "Science" are among the most accessible standouts from an incredibly diverse set, the likes of which SOAD's inferior nu-metal peers could only hope to emulate. Lyrically, it's simply no contest. Whether tackling typical rock subject matter like drug abuse ("Needles") and groupies ("Psycho"), or embarking on inscrutable Dadaist gems like "Jet Pilot" and "Shimmy," co-songwriters Daron Malakian and Serj Tankain sound like are the bastard children of Frank Zappa and Slayer. And while sub-Rage Against the Machine political invective (unfairly attributed to their Armenian heritage) remains an integral part of the band's creative makeup (e.g. "Deer Dance," "Atwa"), Toxicity's approach is much more cautious in this regard than that of their incendiary debut. In conclusion, when a band takes this many left turns, you'd expect them to start going in circles sooner rather than later, but this is not the case with System of a Down. Hands down one of 2001's top metal releases, Toxicity may well prove to be a lasting heavy metal classic to boot.
© Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo

About the album

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

Songs In The Key Of Life

Stevie Wonder

Songs In The Key Of Life Stevie Wonder

Innervisions

Stevie Wonder

Innervisions Stevie Wonder

Talking Book

Stevie Wonder

Talking Book Stevie Wonder

What's Going On

Marvin Gaye

What's Going On Marvin Gaye
More on Qobuz
By System Of A Down

Protect The Land / Genocidal Humanoidz

System Of A Down

Hypnotize

System Of A Down

Hypnotize System Of A Down

Mezmerize

System Of A Down

Mezmerize System Of A Down

Steal This Album!

System Of A Down

Steal This Album! System Of A Down

Toxicity

System Of A Down

Toxicity System Of A Down

Playlists

You may also like...

For Those That Wish To Exist

Architects

Back In Black

AC/DC

Highway To Hell

AC/DC

S&M2

Metallica

S&M2 Metallica

Metallica

Metallica

Metallica Metallica
In your panoramas...
The Dark Side of the Moon: An Astronomical Success

Pink Floyd's ground-breaking album The Dark Side of the Moon was the result of a long creative process that began around 1968. A Saucerful of Secrets (the main track from the eponymous album) was, for Nick Mason at least, where it all began. Their next album Ummagumma (1969) gave each band member the opportunity to create a solo piece, though they would have to combine their talents if they wanted to hit the jackpot. Pink Floyd continued to search for the perfect record with Meddle, an album which highlighted their skills in the studio, and Atom Heart Mother, before they reached nirvana with The Dark Side of the Moon. And the album’s perfection hasn’t faded one bit.

Back in Black: AC/DC in all Their Glory

With 50 million copies sold, Back in Black is the second best-selling album of all time just behind Michael Jackson’s thriller. Who could have imagined that AC/DC’s seventh studio album would pick up so many awards considering their charismatic lead-singer Bon Scott’s premature death after the release of Highway to Hell. The album marked the end of their first chapter but the beginning of their second which fans of the Australian band today continue to relish…

The Golden Age of American Death Metal

An often rejected, parodied and misinterpreted sub-genre of metal, the fierce death metal has nevertheless succeeded in garnering a significant following over the decades. Arriving in the 80s, the genre continues to evolve; from its early pursuit of the ultra-violent to its more recent incorporation of aspects from more mainstream genres. Let us look back at the origins of death metal.

In the news...