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Alternative & Indie - Released August 31, 2018 | Captured Tracks

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For over a decade, Jack Tatum aka Wild Nothing has served as an indispensable ambassador for dream pop in all its splendour. Wrapping up his larger-than-life, dreamy melodies in guitars that reverberate out to infinity, the Virginian always pays equal attention to the microphone and the pen. His voice carries the same narrative thread, light and blurry, that Morrissey or Robert Smith used to unfurl amidst clouds of melancholy and surrealism with an uneasy charm... Wild Nothing retains this facility for ill-at-ease music that relates untellable stories. With Indigo, Tatum expands his palette, taking on board more synths and Eighties sounds. "I wanted it to sound like a classic studio record, as close as I could get it there", explains our sculptor of crystalline melodies. "It just boils down to me wanting to fit into some larger narrative, musically, in terms of these artists I love. The records that have influenced the actual sound of Indigo are by Roxy Music, Kate Bush, and Fleetwood Mac; Roxy Music’s Avalon is one of my favourite records ever. I think about how my music will age. Ideas of 'timeless' are going to be different — so if Indigo is not timeless then it’s at least 'out of time.'" Jack Tatum's strength lies in perfectly fusing these archetypal influences with Wild Nothing's unique characteristics. At the outset, his fourth album offers a cinematic dream pop, as if the four walls of the student digs where Wild Nothing was born had melted away, to reveal wide open spaces...© Max Dembo/Qobuz  
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 25, 2010 | Captured Tracks

If Wild Nothing's debut album, Gemini, consisted of nothing more that the song “Summer Holiday” and 25 minutes of a dial tone, it would still be one of the best records to come out of the lo-fi, reverb pop scene of 2010. The song's four minutes of achingly pretty guitar chime, soaring vocal melodies, and rhythmic charge that’s easy to get swept up in result in what can only be called perfect pop. The vocal-bass-drum breakdown halfway through is the kind of heart-stopping moment that bands dream of capturing in their songs. Incredibly, Gemini is filled with songs that rate just below "Summer Holiday" -- some, like “My Angel Lonely” and “O, Lilac,” are arguably just as good. Wild Nothing's main (and only) man Jack Tatum may have been a recent high-school graduate when the album was recorded, but he proves himself to be a scholar of music that was for the most part dead and buried long before his birth. There are sounds traceable to OMD, the Cocteau Twins, New Order, Echo & the Bunnymen, and scores of post-punk dreamers and synth pop romantics. The cheesy synths, heavily treated guitars, tons of cheapo drum machines and heavily layered production are totally '80s, but unlike most bands of the era he so loves, Tatum’s vocals don’t dominate the sound. Instead, he blends them into the arrangements, using them as just another element of the overall texture and feel. It’s a choice that could have led to the songs losing some impact, but the melodies are so strong and Tatum’s ability to create a mood of quiet desperation is so perfectly calibrated that you wouldn’t want to change a thing sound-wise. It’s a mood with many variations, too -- from the echoing, distant-sounding “The Witching Hour” to the quietly pulsating, almost bleak “Pessimist,“ Tatum makes sure to alter the sound and rhythmic approach enough to keep the listener engaged. His melodic gifts are powerful enough that even if he had no production skills at all, the album would still be great. In fact, he easily could have made 11 variations on "Summer Holiday" and had a hit record. That he explores different avenues and does so successfully bodes well for future releases. ~ Tim Sendra
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 6, 2018 | Captured Tracks

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 16, 2019 | Captured Tracks

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 27, 2012 | Bella Union

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Wild Nothing's excellent debut album Gemini had a homemade, slightly wonky feel that gave Jack Tatum's take on '80s new wave pop a human touch. (Also, it included the brilliant single "Summer Holiday.") For the follow-up Nocturne, Tatum headed to the Rare Book Room to work with producer Nicolas Vernhes, and together the two crafted an album that takes Wild Nothing's sound out of the bedroom, dresses it in fancy clothing, and manages to be just as impressive. The overall sound of the album is much more layered and smooth; Tatum's bathed-in-warm-reverb voice is even lower in the mix, the guitars chime and ring but are rarely spiky, and the keyboards are more atmospheric than before. Another change on Nocturne is the live drums, which give the sound a boost in energy and power. While Gemini's drum machines were fun, they sometimes got in the way of the songs with their sometimes-cheesy retro-ness. No more of that for Tatum, this a meticulously crafted album that's the product of a pro studio and a seasoned producer. And while that's an approach that can often sink an album (and a career), in this case it works really well. The album's richly textured sound is a perfect match for the kind of relaxed and tuneful songs that dominate, Tatum and Vernhes focus the songs emotionally and sonically into an overall package that sounds lovely and has some real depth. There's no "Summer Holiday" this time out, but all the record's 11 songs are deeply memorable with subtle and long-lasting melodies. Some, like the jangly love song "Only Heather" or the string-filled and beautiful "Shadow," sound like hit singles, the rest are just great songs. A few even provide some surprises: "Through the Grass" is a positive sweetheart of a ballad featuring some nimbly picked acoustic guitar that conjures up memories of early Aztec Camera, "Paradise" is a big pop song that could be slotted into the climax of a John Hughes movie with a graceful ease. The album is much more Echo & the Bunnymen than it is Crocodiles, more Mirror Moves than Talk Talk Talk, but it doesn't suffer for it. Instead, thanks to the high level of Tatum's songs and the sound he and Vernhes create, it's just the kind of album that could connect with lovers of slick, catchy pop with real humans behind the controls. ~ Tim Sendra
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Alternative & Indie - Released July 19, 2018 | Captured Tracks

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 19, 2016 | Bella Union

After heading into a real studio on the second Wild Nothing record Nocturne, Jack Tatum recorded the next album in three studios with producer Thom Monahan. Working in Sweden with drummer John Eriksson (of Peter Bjorn and John), in L.A. with Medicine guitarist Brad Laner, and closer to home in Brooklyn, the sound Tatum gets on Life of Pause is rich and luxurious. Where previous records have been bathed in reverb and were clearly the work of one person, this time the effects are kept on a low boil, the collaborations are clear, and the overall feel is like the jump from a small stage to a large concert hall. The arrangements are full to bursting, with grand pianos, marimbas, backing vocals, and saxophones surrounding Tatum's plaintive vocals. The songs are less insistent than before, too, with longer running times that allow for melodies to unspool slowly and drama to build organically. There aren't any songs like "Only Heather" or "Shadows" here, the kind that sound like radio hits; instead, it's like an album full of deep cuts that reveal themselves more fully on each listen, less immediately, but with deeper pleasure. A couple tracks stand out from the decidedly midtempo mix; the shoegaze pop of "Japanese Alice" and the very Peter Bjorn and John-sounding "Reichpop" provide some color. Not that the album is in dire need of bright hues, since the overwhelmingly grey shadings are vibrant enough, and Tatum makes sure to add little bits and pieces to each song to keep them sounding different enough. He and Monahan seem to have fussed with every last note and tone, buffing them to a sleek and shiny finish that serves the songs in just the right way. It's a fine match of maturing songwriter with an aged-to-perfection production that feels like a subtle progression from the last album, not some lurch into professional recording that leaves Tatum sounding lost and the listener wondering where all the stuff they liked about Wild Nothing disappeared to. All the good stuff is still here, one might just have to do a little digging, hang in through a couple listens, and then the songs on Life of Pause will begin to connect with the head and the heart. ~ Tim Sendra
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 27, 2012 | Bella Union

Wild Nothing's excellent debut album Gemini had a homemade, slightly wonky feel that gave Jack Tatum's take on '80s new wave pop a human touch. (Also, it included the brilliant single "Summer Holiday.") For the follow-up Nocturne, Tatum headed to the Rare Book Room to work with producer Nicolas Vernhes, and together the two crafted an album that takes Wild Nothing's sound out of the bedroom, dresses it in fancy clothing, and manages to be just as impressive. The overall sound of the album is much more layered and smooth; Tatum's bathed-in-warm-reverb voice is even lower in the mix, the guitars chime and ring but are rarely spiky, and the keyboards are more atmospheric than before. Another change on Nocturne is the live drums, which give the sound a boost in energy and power. While Gemini's drum machines were fun, they sometimes got in the way of the songs with their sometimes-cheesy retro-ness. No more of that for Tatum, this a meticulously crafted album that's the product of a pro studio and a seasoned producer. And while that's an approach that can often sink an album (and a career), in this case it works really well. The album's richly textured sound is a perfect match for the kind of relaxed and tuneful songs that dominate, Tatum and Vernhes focus the songs emotionally and sonically into an overall package that sounds lovely and has some real depth. There's no "Summer Holiday" this time out, but all the record's 11 songs are deeply memorable with subtle and long-lasting melodies. Some, like the jangly love song "Only Heather" or the string-filled and beautiful "Shadow," sound like hit singles, the rest are just great songs. A few even provide some surprises: "Through the Grass" is a positive sweetheart of a ballad featuring some nimbly picked acoustic guitar that conjures up memories of early Aztec Camera, "Paradise" is a big pop song that could be slotted into the climax of a John Hughes movie with a graceful ease. The album is much more Echo & the Bunnymen than it is Crocodiles, more Mirror Moves than Talk Talk Talk, but it doesn't suffer for it. Instead, thanks to the high level of Tatum's songs and the sound he and Vernhes create, it's just the kind of album that could connect with lovers of slick, catchy pop with real humans behind the controls. ~ Tim Sendra
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 2, 2010 | Captured Tracks

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 12, 2010 | Captured Tracks

"'Vultures Like Lovers' is pure, ecstatic texture, a heavily processed guitar ping-ponging with delay, and Tatum's tremolo'd vocals building a cyclone from the ground up."
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 13, 2013 | Bella Union

Jack Tatum's gleaming nocturnal synth pop as Wild Nothing produced not only an incredible string of recordings, but also spearheaded a micro-movement of indie-level dream pop more rooted in the '80s synth reflections of acts like Echo & the Bunnymen or Aztec Camera than the mumbly fractalized bedroom productions coming from chillwave circles. 2010's brilliant debut Gemini and 2012's more polished Nocturne were bridged by the piecemeal Golden Haze EP, and now Empty Estate follows that trend with seven new tracks to tide fans over until the release of a third album. While Wild Nothing's output up to this point saw various upgrades in production values, they all maintained a certain consistency and overall color. Empty Estate, while every bit as polished (if not more so) than the fancifully recorded Nocturne, sets itself apart by exploring different absent-minded stylistic detours on almost every track. The set is opened by the swaggering midtempo rock of "The Body in Rainfall," which sees Tatum applying some subtle Heroes-era Bowie-isms to his jauntily melodic palette. Tracks like the upbeat "Data World" and "A Dancing Shell" come closer to the shimmery '80s-inspired sounds we're used to from Wild Nothing, but they're more curious, with a lot more sequenced electronics and some awkward risky moments. Blurty processed sax solos, robotic vocoder voices, and jagged guitar lines all drop in for segments and then disappear, some of the ideas translating well and others just coming along for the ride. These more straightforward moments are broken up by tracks like the wobbly instrumental bubbling of "On Guyot" or the hypnotic slow-burning faux-Krautrock of "Ride." Certain moments feel more like tentative experiments, but ultimately any of these tracks could be the jumping-off point for an entire album's worth of material, and hearing them all together makes for a more interesting presentation. By the time closing track "Hachiko" comes in with its softly ambient strains, Empty Estate has wandered through various modes, ultimately coming off like a thoroughly pleasant but unexpected long walk on a summer evening, with Tatum stopping for a moment to say hello to all his various different inclinations for a moment before moving on. ~ Fred Thomas
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 7, 2018 | Captured Tracks

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 22, 2018 | Captured Tracks

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 6, 2013 | Bella Union

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 4, 2012 | Captured Tracks

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 2, 2012 | Bella Union

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 2, 2012 | Bella Union