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Rock - Released February 12, 2021 | Century Media

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Rock - Released October 21, 2016 | Razor & Tie

The Pretty Reckless came into their own on 2014's Going to Hell, a sophomore set that found them executing their neo-grunge in a catchier, harder fashion than their debut. Now that they've mastered their vocabulary, it's time for them to expand their horizons on 2016's Who You Selling For. Such ambitions are evident from the somber artwork and the multi-part title of "The Walls Are Closing In/Hangman," the track that gets Who You Selling For off to somewhat of an epic start. While the Pretty Reckless resist the urge to go prog, they do operate with a grander sense of scale here, while also incorporating a stronger sense of swing; the verses of "Take Me Down" percolate to a surprisingly funky groove while "Prisoner" grinds to a heavy stomp. Elsewhere, the Pretty Reckless stretch into territory that can only be called classic rock -- filled with acoustic guitars and piano, "Back to the River" is refried Southern rock, "Already Dead" is a slow Led Zeppelin blues jam by any other name, and the folksiness of "Bedroom Window" recalls Stevie Nicks at her gentlest -- and this winds up contrasting nicely with what remains of the band's revivalist grunge. All these new developments are pretty clear signs that the Pretty Reckless have decided to grow up on Who You Selling For and, thanks to their inherent muscle and the sharp articulation of producer Kato Khandwala, this self-conscious maturation succeeds. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released March 17, 2014 | Cooking Vinyl

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2010 | DAS Label - Interscope Records

At their best, the Pretty Reckless are just the right band to combine the dirty blues swagger of White Stripes with the acidic guitar rasp of Shellac, but even at their most conventional, they are a very good unit worth describing with excited expletives. The two opening cuts are the most delicious in that regard, packing plenty of grooves and plenty of heaviness -- and "Since You're Gone" is the best female-fronted metal answer to Led Zeppelin out there, as powerful and venomous as Zepp's own "Since I've Been Loving You" was mellow and rambling. After that, the band retreats into safer alt/nu-metal territory, returning to the blues only for the two final songs (one of which is actually a country-fied ballad), but even there, they are still good -- more ferocious than average radio rockers, and with better pop savvy, too. A lot of riffs on Light Me Up can actually be traced back to other bands, from Deep Purple to Hole to Metallica to Smashing Pumpkins, and there are even ten seconds of Queen theatrics on "Goin' Down," with a degree of certainty sufficient to stand a court trial. The group appropriates those theatrics completely, integrating them into their loud, cocksure, arrogant, and irresistible brand of heavy rock. Taylor Momsen plays a role, too, coming across as the strongest and bitchiest female vocalist to front an alt-rock band since Garbage's Shirley Manson, whose group, while not a direct influence, also seems to have taught Pretty Reckless a thing or two about how to use everything you like in music to write loud, catchy, lasting pop songs. If the band had explored their bluesy leanings more, Light Me Up could have been a small-scale revolution, but even as it stands now, it's still a wicked good record. © Alexey Eremenko /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2012 | DAS Label - Interscope Records

Naturally, the title song of the spring 2012 EP Hit Me Like a Man was intended to offend: that's what Taylor Momsen and her crew in the Pretty Reckless do, they push buttons. If they weren't so blunt in their provocations, their barely updated L.A. sleaze rock wouldn't cause so many ripples, but the Pretty Reckless are proudly ballsy. They're also kind of stupidly ballsy, hammering every one of their points with a hundred-pound sledgehammer, but the obviousness of it all is the appeal and the three new songs here -- all about sexual politics, all roiling with the heavy-lidded violence that surfaces explicitly on the title track -- are harder and better than much of their guilty-pleasure debut, Light Me Up. Sure, former child actress Momsen may just be acting out her teenage rebellion on a large stage and her imagination may be limited, but she is not insincere and the heartfelt tawdriness of Hit Me Like a Man is oddly compelling. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released August 21, 2020 | Century Media

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Rock - Released May 15, 2020 | Century Media

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Rock - Released November 27, 2020 | Interscope

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 6, 2010 | DAS Label - Interscope Records

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Rock - Released January 20, 2014 | Cooking Vinyl

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Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | DAS Label - Interscope Records

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Rock - Released May 12, 2014 | Cooking Vinyl

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Rock - Released October 7, 2013 | Cooking Vinyl

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Rock - Released September 29, 2014 | Cooking Vinyl

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Rock - Released October 23, 2020 | Century Media

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Rock - Released September 17, 2021 | Century Media

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2010 | DAS Label - Interscope Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 6, 2010 | DAS Label - Interscope Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2010 | DAS Label - Interscope Records