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Jazz - Released April 6, 2018 | Okeh

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Qobuzissime
They knew what they were doing when they named this record Nordub. Nor for North, represented here by Nils Petter Molvaer. In 1997, when the label ECM brought out the stunning album Khmer, this Norwegian trumpeter shook the jazz world by bringing electronic music into his atmospheric musical world. Nor is also his fellow countryman, guitarist Eivind Aarset and Finnish electro-tinkerer and DJ Vladislav Delay. As for the three letters of Dub, they stand for the genre's most classic duo: Sly Dunbar on drums and bassist Robbie Shakespeare. In 2016, this motley crew made up of the Jamaican tandem and Nils Petter Molvaer hit the stage. It was quite a warm-up for their studio session in Oslo. In essence, Molvaer's world has always been a hybrid, bringing together textures that were never exclusively jazz. His playing style uses different atmospheric controls without ever losing the creative strength of his improvisations or compositions. Here, the trumpeter even works his way into the unique Sly & Robbie sound with a perfectly natural air. And that is surely the strength of Nordub. No-one takes over, or tries to overpower the other. The fusion is total, and sincere. We even feel that our two old Jamaican long-distance travellers have strayed out of their normal comfort zone to take part actively in this music as it takes shape. Just like Aarset and Delay's work, every part is a vital component of the final result. Together, our five sound adventurers produce a fine symphony of truly singular dub and jazz. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Reggae - Released December 16, 2014 | Tabou 1

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Featuring basic tracks cut for Horace Andy, Chezidek, Bunny Rugs, and Khalifa between the years 2006 and 2012, Sly & Robbie's 2014 effort Dubrising was later touched by the hands of keyboardist Dan Donovan from Big Audio Dynamite, but more importantly, these riddims were later dubbed by engineer and producer Paul "Groucho" Smykle for the first Sly, Robbie, and Groucho tracks in nearly 30 years. It's a relationship that goes back to the heyday of Black Uhuru and the great U.K. post-punk and reggae mash-ups, but no one here is hung up on being monumental, as Dubrising plays out cool and tasteful, like old friends who pick right up where they left off decades ago. Sly & Robbie's naturally grooving melodies get a bit of Donovan's space age and/or spaghetti western keyboard work, while Smykle is here to treat it all with proper echo, punch, and edits. Check the cool "Freedom Ring" for every ingredient in just the right measure, or "No Surrender" for a bumpier ride where all three parties get their turn. The closing "Double Agent" takes the brokenhearted reggae classic "Rumors" and dubs it into some masterful spy movie music with a Jamaican spin, while the mysterious and sharp "Drone Snipers" is everything its evocative title implies. Sly & Robbie's discography is huge, and since 2012, they've been adding nothing but excellence to the pile, but Dubrising deserves special attention from the dubheads, '80s heads, and the Uhuru faithful. All those spirits are rekindled here, and there's some wicked robot cover art on top of it all, just to make the set's worth undeniable. ~ David Jeffries
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Dub - Released February 22, 2018 | Tabou 1

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Reggae - Released August 1, 2013 | Trojan Records

Drummer Sly Dunbar and bassist Robbie Shakespeare have been at the epicenter of reggae, dub, ragga, and Jamaican crossover music since the 1970s. Known primarily for their innovative work as session musicians, the Riddim Twins (as they are called) also garnered attention for their cutting-edge production techniques. In addition to helping to define the sound of such Jamaican superstars as Gregory Isaacs, Peter Tosh, and Black Uhuru, Sly & Robbie have also worked with Grace Jones, Bob Dylan, and Herbie Hancock, among others. RIDDIM collects the duo's own work in the dub vein between 1978 and 1985. While Sly & Robbie have lent their trademark sound to recordings that range all over the stylistic map, it's perfectly suited to the deep, heady vibe of instrumental dub. Shakespeare's pulsing, organic bass bobs and weaves between Dunbar's fractured, rimshot-filled rhythms, creating grooves that are at once spare, elemental, complex, and irresistible. Ironically, Sly & Robbie man the mixing boards on only a few tracks here, allowing guest producers to assist in constructing their soundscapes. The result is a lengthy, completely satisfying set of instrumental dub that spotlights the talents of one of the world's most notorious rhythm sections.
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Reggae - Released November 30, 2016 | Tabou 1

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Reggae - Released January 1, 1979 | Taxi

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Dub - Released June 1, 2018 | Tabou 1

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Reggae - Released January 1, 1983 | Taxi

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Reggae - Released January 1, 1986 | New Rounder (UMG Account)

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World - Released March 28, 2006 | Charly Records

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World - Released June 1, 2006 | Charly Records

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Reggae - Released February 1, 2006 | Mideya

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Reggae - Released January 1, 1992 | Taxi

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Rap - Released February 24, 2012 | Groove Attack Productions

Easily the hardest-working and one of the longest-running rhythm sections in the history of Jamaican music, Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare have provided the backbone for so many tracks in their 40-plus-year run that it's almost incalculable. In the course of that run, when not crafting what would become classic riddims or backing up pop stars, they were also involved in some of the earliest waves of dub, releasing dub sets like Raiders of the Lost Dub and Gamblers Choice under their own name as well as laying the foundation for countless dub mixes with their playing. Blackwood Dub, the first strictly dub, vocal-free offering from the duo in many years, revisits some of the tenets of dub they helped develop, sometimes leaning toward the nostalgic, but staying progressive overall. The cavernous production and eerie percussion touches on "Riding East" have a decidedly vintage sound, harking back to the Channel One days. "The Bomber" fits into this pre-'80s sound as well, with Lee Perry-esque weirdo electronic flourishes riding Sly's hypnotic Syndrum rhythms. Throughout Blackwood Dub there are new subtleties that acknowledge the infusion of dub into the digital world that's happened in the time between its roots in the '70s and the very different landscape of 2012. The watery electronic bubblings that underscore "Burru Saturday" and "Communication Breakdown" add life and a slightly modern feel to these masterful rhythms without edging toward dubstep or breaking the flow of the album with radically more electronic production. Likewise, the droning "Frenchman Code" leans ever so slightly away from the classic dub formula, taking on an almost mantric quality in its repetition. Dunbar's unwavering bassline coasts on tabla-informed drum patterns and stereo delayed bursts of Mikey "Mao" Chung's slinky guitar lines. The ten songs on Blackwood Dub represent less of a look backward or forward for Sly & Robbie as they do a continuation of a still growing tradition. It could be backing up Britney Spears or laying down a set of burning dub tracks such as these. At this point it's just another day at the office for the Rhythm Twins, in the most natural, organic, and exciting way possible. ~ Fred Thomas
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Reggae - Released January 1, 2017 | Tabou 1

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Reggae - Released January 1, 1980 | Taxi

Sly & Robbie came up as part of the Revolutionaries band in the '70s, contributing as the house band at Kingston's legendary Channel One Studio. By the time the roots reggae period gave way to the secular-minded dancehall era of the early '80s, Sly & Robbie had gone into the production business themselves with their Taxi label. Counting such Jamaican music luminaries on their roster as Dennis Brown, Black Uhuru, the Wailing Souls, and Junior Delgado, Sly & Robbie forged their own progressive, synth-enhanced sound, and became one of the premiere production teams and backing bands in the process. This sampler tells a bit of the story. Taking in sides by Brown ("Sitting and Watching"), Delgado, and the Wailing Souls, the 12 tracks here also feature fine performances by the legendary DJ General Echo, Gregory Isaacs, the Viceroys, and the Tamlins. Maybe not the best or most thorough of introductions, Sly & Robbie Present Taxi still qualifies as a fine sampler for the curious. ~ Stephen Cook
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Reggae - Released September 9, 2011 | Attack

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Reggae - Released January 31, 2015 | Tabou 1

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Reggae - Released September 4, 2015 | Tuff Gong Records

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Reggae - Released January 1, 2002 | Taxi

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