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Rock - Released April 29, 2014 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop/Rock - Released October 15, 2013 | Columbia - Legacy

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released July 10, 2014 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released April 29, 2014 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop/Rock - Released April 29, 2014 | Columbia - Legacy

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop/Rock - Released June 20, 1994 | Columbia

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Borboletta was the first new Santana band studio album in 11 months and the group's sixth overall. Once again, individual credits were listed for each song. The main problem was that the band seemed to be coasting; Carlos turned in the usual complement of high-pitched lead guitar work, and the percussionists pounded away, but the Santana sound had long since taken over from any individual composition, and the records were starting to sound alike. That, in turn, started to make them inessential; Borboletta spent less time on the charts than any previous Santana album. ~ William Ruhlmann
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Pop/Rock - Released October 1, 1985 | Columbia

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Since he had joined Santana in 1972, keyboard player Tom Coster had been Carlos Santana's right-hand man, playing, co-writing, co-producing, and generally taking the place of founding member Greg Rolie. But Coster left the band in the spring of 1978, to be replaced by keyboardist/guitarist Chris Solberg and keyboardist Chris Rhyme. Despite the change, the band soldiered on, and with Inner Secrets, they scored three chart singles: the disco-ish "One Chain (Don't Make No Prison)" (#59), "Stormy" (#32), and a cover of Buddy Holly's "Well All Right" (#69), done in the Blind Faith arrangement. (There seems to be a Steve Winwood fixation here. The album also featured a cover of Traffic's "Dealer.") The singles kept the album on the charts longer than any Santana LP since 1971, but it was still a minor disappointment after Moonflower, and in retrospect seems like one of the band's more compromised efforts. ~ William Ruhlmann
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Pop/Rock - Released October 3, 1988 | Columbia

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After teaming up with Herbie Hancock for the jazz-flavored The Swing of Delight album, Carlos Santana reentered the pop/rock realm with the rest of his band for 1981's Zebop!. He still managed to include a little bit of his famed Latino sound into a few of the tracks ("E Papa Re," "American Gypsy"), albeit only slightly, but Zebop!'s overall feel is that of commercial rock, with the guitar arriving at the forefront through most of the cuts. Santana does a marvelous job at covering Russ Ballard's "Winning," taking it to number 17 on the charts, while "The Sensitive Kind" is built around the same type of radio-friendly structure yet it stalled at number 56. Zebop!'s formula is simple, and all of the songs carry an appeal that is aimed at a wider and more marketable audience base, with "Changes," "Searchin," and "I Love You Much Too Much" coming through as efficient yet not overly extravagant rock & roll efforts. The album's adjustable rhythms and accommodating structures kept the band alive as the decade rolled over, peaking at number 33 in the U.K. but cracking the Top Ten in the United States, which eventually led to Zebop! going gold. Actually, "Winning" followed in the same footsteps as Santana's last couple of Top 40 singles in "You Know That I Love You" from 1980 and "Stormy" from 1979. Shango, the album that came after Zebop!, gave them another hit with "Hold On," sung by bandmember Alex Ligertwood. ~ Mike DeGagne
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Pop/Rock - Released September 7, 1987 | Columbia

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Shango is notable for featuring the return, in the role of co-producer and co-songwriter, of original Santana keyboardist Greg Rolie. The main producer, however, was Bill Szymczyk (James Gang, Eagles), who gave Santana an unusually sharp rock sound resulting in two more hit singles, "Hold On" (Number 15), and "Nowhere to Run" (Number 66), although the band once again slipped below the Top Ten and gold-selling status, with the album peaking at only Number 22, and even this was the highest Santana would get until Supernatural in 1999. ~ William Ruhlmann
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Rock - Released September 22, 1992 | Columbia - Legacy

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop/Rock - Released April 15, 1991 | Epic

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Freedom marked several reunions in the Santana band, which was now a nonet. In addition to Carlos, the band consisted of percussionists Armando Pereza, Orestes Vilato, and Raul Rekow; returning drummer Graham Lear; bassist Alphonso Johnson; returning keyboardist Tom Coster, keyboardist Chester Thompson, and, on lead vocals, Buddy Miles, who had made a duet album with Santana 15 years before. Credited as an "additional musician" was keyboard player Greg Rolie, an original member. The music also marked a return from the hyper-pop sound of Val Garay on Beyond Appearances to a more traditional Santana Latin rock style. Thus, Freedom was a literal return to form, but, unfortunately, not to the quality of early Santana albums. And the group's commercial decline continued, with the LP getting to only Number 95. ~ William Ruhlmann
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Pop/Rock - Released October 22, 2002 | Columbia - Legacy

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Rock - Released April 15, 2016 | Santana IV Records

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45. This is the number of years that passed between Santana III and Santana IV. No joke. The struggle has been very real for fans of the guitar-wielding Santana. It’s another guitarist, Neal Schon, who is behind the project. He tested the water with the idea of ​​a potential collaboration with Santana back in 2013, and finally the two musicians decided to recall the entire band from 1971: Greg Rollie (piano/vocals), Michael Carabello (percussion), Michael Shrieve (drums), all were present. The artists got to work in 2013 and recorded more or less 50 tracks. The 16 ‘most successful’ were retained and becomeSantana IV. The spicy recipe is wonderfully cooked and includes everything that perfectly identities the Group – from Latin music to jazz, Caribbean rhythms to blues, psychedelic to sunny afro... The whole thing is undeniably groovy and Santana perpetuates a dance that takes into account rhythm and melody simultaneously. The musicians have no difficulty in finding picture-perfect complicity after so many years apart, and have helped to save a portion of Shake It as a wonderful jam track. Special guest Roman Isley (singer from the famous Isley Brothers), is also part of the group and adds his voice on two tracks. You might think you’ve heard it all, but Santana has nothing but proof here that this isn’t the case. © AR/Qobuz
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Rock - Released April 29, 2014 | Columbia - Legacy

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Pop - Released September 25, 2007 | Arista

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Rock - Released August 19, 1986 | Columbia

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Rock - Released April 29, 2014 | Columbia - Legacy

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Pop - Released July 10, 2014 | Columbia - Legacy

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Pop/Rock - Released September 20, 2010 | Arista

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Pop/Rock - Released April 29, 2014 | Columbia

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Santana in the magazine
  • Santana, Volume 4 (finally!)
    Santana, Volume 4 (finally!) The eagerly awaited sequel to 'Santana III' has been released...
  • The Qobuz Minute #11
    The Qobuz Minute #11 Presented by Barry Moore, The Qobuz Minute sweeps you away to the 4 corners of the musical universe to bring you an eclectic mix of today's brightest talents. Jazz, Electro, Classical, World music ...