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Classical - Released October 1, 2013 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Record of the Month - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released November 16, 2010 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Award - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Classical - Released November 17, 2009 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Hi-Res Audio
These accounts of four diverse works by Ralph Vaughan Williams are in every way splendid. James Judd clearly knows his way around these scores, and his conducting is as precise and propulsive as it is richly colored and deeply affectionate. His Wasps overture has plenty of snap and bite, while his English Folk Song Suite and The Running Set (another folk song suite in all but name) are bright and colorful. The Royal Liverpool Philharmonic responds to the conductor and the music with energy, enthusiasm, and plenty of power, and its playing compares favorably to that of the orchestras of that nation's capital. Pianist Ashley Wass covers himself with glory in his robustly virtuosic but warmly nuanced reading of the English composer's relatively rarely recorded Piano Concerto, particularly in the work's lyrical central Romanza. For dedicated Vaughan Williams aficionados, this disc may not erase memories of Adrian Boult's witty Wasps and muscular English Folk Song Suite, nor Howard Shelley and Vernon Handley's revelatory Piano Concerto, but there is much to savor in Judd and Wass' sleek and insightful performances. Naxos' digital sound is too reserved and recessed to be wholly effective. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 27, 2009 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released April 29, 2013 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - La Clef du mois RESMUSICA
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Classical - Released October 4, 2011 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released March 18, 2010 | Avie Records

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or
It's possible to admire Simon Trpceski's bravura performances of Sergey Rachmaninov's piano concertos No. 2 and No. 3 without focusing too closely on the recording's problems, because this pianist brings so much passion, character, and brilliance to his playing that it overrides complaints one might have about the orchestral imbalance or inadequacies of sound quality. Accompanied by Vasily Petrenko and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, Trpceski throws all of his energy and élan into the solo part, and his vitality carries these extremely familiar concertos along, where a lesser pianist might not have made them sound as convincing. However, the piano part is sometimes in danger of being washed out by the thick orchestral textures, and the swelling of sound in bass-heavy passages seems artificially boosted through mixing. Rachmaninov's orchestration is especially opaque in the Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, so special attention should have been paid to adjusting the dynamics of the lower range instruments. The situation markedly improves in the lighter textures of the Allegro scherzando, and the more skillfully orchestrated Piano Concerto No. 3 in D minor has fewer incidents of dense instrumentation and close bass harmonies. But even the richness of Rachmaninov's accompaniment in the mid-range tends to mask the piano's full resonance, and the full climaxes of the first and third movements present Trpceski with his most serious challenges. On the whole, this is an enjoyable album of two of the most dazzling -- if over-played and over-recorded -- concertos in the repertoire, and Trpceski acquits himself admirably. Listeners, however, may find adjusting the volume and balance controls a challenge in its own right. © TiVo
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Classical - Released March 2, 2018 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Classical - Released October 25, 2013 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released February 9, 2010 | Avie Records

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
These may not be the greatest performances of these three Rachmaninov works ever recorded, but they are very close. Some might point to Eugene Ormandy's smoothly seductive recording of the Symphonic Dances, or Fritz Reiner's soul-smashing recording of The Isle of the Dead, or Evgeny Svetlanov's heartbreaking recording of The Rock. Nonetheless, Vasily Petrenko and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic deliver extremely well-played performances of extraordinary energy, soul, and dedication. Though not the best orchestra in England, the Liverpool orchestra is still quite fine, and more than up to the demands of these works both individually -- for example, the saxophone solo in the central portion of the first Symphonic Dance or the flute solo that opens The Rock -- and collectively -- the surging rhythms and gargantuan chords at the climax of The Isle of the Dead, for instance. While Petrenko is not yet an Ormandy, Reiner, or Svetlanov, he is well on his way, with confidently assured readings that bring out the power and pathos of these works without succumbing to either brutality or bathos. Avie's digital sound, though clear enough, doesn't have sufficient impact, but the performances almost overcome that deficiency. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 28, 2008 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Award
If after hearing this superb 2008 Naxos disc some obstinate listeners insist on maintaining that the Manfred Symphony and the symphonic ballad The Voyevoda are lesser Tchaikovsky, it's not the fault of the performers. Vasily Petrenko is a talented conductor who knows how to get the best out of a score and an orchestra and his honest fondness for the repertoire cannot be doubted. The Royal Liverpool Philharmonic is likewise a skillful orchestra with a polished sound, a tight ensemble, and excellent soloists. But though Petrenko keeps things moving and the Liverpool musicians keep things taut, Manfred and Voyevoda refuse to become more than what they are: evocative but episodic scores filled with banal themes, garish orchestrations, and turgid rhythms. So while those stubborn listeners might concede few earlier recordings of Manfred and the Voyevoda have surpassed this one, they might also acknowledge Petrenko and the Royal Liverpool cannot redeem these two lugubrious works from their less than exalted status in Tchaikovsky's oeuvre. Naxos' digital sound is clear and colorful, if a bit distant. © TiVo
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Classical - Released May 25, 2010 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released March 31, 2009 | Naxos

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Ballets - Released October 30, 2020 | PM Classics Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet
The collaboration of the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic and conductor Vasily Petrenko continues to yield satisfying results as orchestra and leader come to know each other at a deeper level. Petrenko had conducted Stravinsky's Petrushka a number of times when these recordings were made in 2017, and by this time, everything in the performance fell perfectly into place. The album did not appear until 2020, perhaps released due to a coronavirus drought of new material; in any event, one can be happy that it was shaken loose from the vaults. Petrenko is not a creator of drastically new interpretations, but he finds the best in the ones that already exist. His Petrushka is precise and wonderfully lively, with every instrumental detail in place, and it would make a great first recording of the work for anyone. For those already deeper into it, the main attraction may be the less common La boutique fantasque, listed as being by Respighi after Rossini. It originated when the impresario Serge Diaghilev moved to Paris during World War I and commissioned several time-travel ballets, as he called them, based on older Italian music. The famous result was Stravinsky's Pulcinella of 1920, but La boutique fantasque preceded it and deserves a new look. It is based on later piano works of Rossini, which were edited by Diaghilev himself, orchestrated by Respighi at Diaghilev's request, and strung together into a short ballet. The results are colorful, less original than Pulcinella surely, but quite complementary to the Stravinsky, and in general, a lot of fun. With the great acoustics of the Philharmonic Hall in Liverpool exploited to the hilt here, this is a superior ballet release. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 11, 2019 | PM Classics Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet
Andrew Manze and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra’s cycle of the 9 Vaughan Williams symphonies have been praised by the reviewers, and their live performances rapturously received. This album contains the most popular of his shorter orchestral works – The Tallis Fantasy, Greensleeves, The Lark Ascending and the wonderful Five Variants of "Dives and Lazarus". The Serenade to Music is heard in the rarely performed orchestral version – this album will be a must have for all fans of the composer! © Onyx Classics
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Classical - Released April 30, 2021 | PM Classics Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet
In Vienna, Alexander Zemlinsky and Franz Schreker conducted experiments that could be seen as a middle road between the rigorous writing of Brahms, the orchestral opulence of Richard Strauss and the dodecaphonic radicalism of Schönberg, Berg and Webern. Unfortunately their experiments were cut short when the Nazis came to power and banned their music. Vasily Petrenko's colourful and imaginative conducting reminds us of these two composers' central importance for the history of early 20th-century music.Based on one of Andersen's fairy tales, Die Seejungfrau ("The Mermaid") was Zemlinsky's musical response to his rejection by Alma Schindler, who preferred the young Mahler. As powerful as its Straussian models, this vast symphonic poem goes even further, with dislocated harmony and a resolutely forward-looking aesthetic. It uses a decidedly Tchaikovskian motif as a linking thread, perhaps accidentally. The magical climate of Zemlinsky's music captivates the listener from the first bars until the magnificent conclusion, when the mermaid throws herself into the sea, turning into foam, renouncing her love forever.Released just a few years prior, Der Geburstag der Infantin ("The Infanta's Birthday") is based on the story by Oscar Wilde. It was originally a pantomime which the composer re-arranged as a suite for large orchestra. It calls for instruments that are unusual in a symphony orchestra, such as two guitars and four mandolins. This pantomime is a curious blend of French impressionism and German post-romanticism, shot through with Mahler's influence, and it débuted in 1908 with sets and costumes in the style of Velázquez. With its delicate, scintillating orchestration, it was a great hit in Vienna, which was then in the throes of modernity.  © François Hudry / Qobuz
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Classical - Released May 16, 2006 | Naxos

Booklet
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Classical - Released June 25, 2021 | PM Classics Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released November 27, 2007 | Naxos

Booklet
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Classical - Released November 18, 2014 | Naxos Special Projects - France