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Rock - Released June 4, 2021 | The Players Club

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Metal - Released August 6, 2010 | Mascot Records

After going a more traditional rock & roll route on his last album, 2009's United States (which featured singer Freddie Nelson), Paul Gilbert gets back to his shred roots on 2010's Fuzz Universe. In fact, you could say that Fuzz Universe is the polar opposite of its predecessor, as not one iota of vocals is featured. And since it's an all-instrumental outing, the focus is 100 percent on Gilbert's fleet fingers. Gilbert certainly turns the clock back to a time when it seemed like just about every guitar player on the rock scene was eager to show off his technical skills on the instrument (in other words, the mid- to late '80s, when the likes of Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, and Yngwie Malmsteen were consistently magazine cover stars). And you'll discover this approach right from the get-go, as evidenced by the turbocharged album-opening title track, and continuing on with "Bach Partita in Dm" (which will catch the attention of classical metal buffs) and "Blowtorch" (which will do the same for '80s pop metalheads). Throughout the years, Gilbert has been very vocal about being a great admirer of Todd Rundgren, and he confirms this once and for all by covering a Rundgren tune, "Blue Orpheus." Gilbert has proven over the years to be one of the few '80s-era speed demons possessing an appreciation of melody and songwriting, and he covers all the bases on Fuzz Universe. © Greg Prato /TiVo
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Rock - Released May 17, 2019 | Music Theories

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Metal - Released January 1, 1986 | Shrapnel Records, Inc.

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Metal - Released December 2, 2010 | Mascot Records

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Rock - Released May 20, 2016 | earMUSIC

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Metal - Released January 1, 2010 | Mascot Records

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Rock - Released August 8, 2014 | Music Theories Recordings

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Metal - Released December 2, 1998 | Shrapnel Records, Inc.

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Metal - Released August 26, 2015 | Shrapnel Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released October 12, 2012 | Mascot Label Group - Music Theories Recordings

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Metal - Released January 1, 2010 | Mascot Records

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Metal - Released January 1, 2010 | Mascot Records

So we all know that Paul Gilbert is certainly fleet fingered on the electric guitar. But what about on the acoustic? Despite being long considered one of rock's top shredders (just check out his faster-than-a-speeding-bullet work with Racer X), interestingly, it was a schmaltzy acoustic ballad that served as Gilbert's career breakthrough -- Mr. Big's "To Be with You." And on his 2003 release, Acoustic Samurai, Gilbert picks up the acoustic once more. Recorded live at Tokyo's Hard Rock Café, the 16-track set finds Gilbert in a largely goofy mood, as evidenced by the album's opening -- the nonsensical singalong "Potato Head," a cover of ABBA's "Dancing Queen," and "I Like Rock" (just by looking at the latter's title, you know its lyrics won't be confused with Shakespeare anytime soon). Quirky pop continues throughout -- as evidenced by such lighthearted ditties as "I Am Satan" and "I'm Not Afraid of the Police." While it was undoubtedly fun for Gilbert to get all this goofiness out of his system (and it sounds like the constantly clapping/singing audience is having the time of their lives), Acoustic Samurai is for hardcore fanatics only. © Greg Prato /TiVo
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Metal - Released November 2, 1999 | Shrapnel Records, Inc.

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Metal - Released December 2, 2010 | Mascot Records

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Metal - Released January 1, 2010 | Mascot Records

"I wanna play guitar every day" go the words to "I Like Rock," the first song from Paul Gilbert's deceptively named 2002 solo album Burning Organ. Both the song and its message may at first seem overly simplistic, but they're actually quite accurate given Gilbert's obviously sincere happiness just to be holding his guitar and making it roar and squeak. After all these years in the rock & roll trenches, it's refreshing to find a guitar hero so incapable of taking himself seriously. In fact, unlike most of his peers in the shredding community, Gilbert not only handles singing as well as six-string chores, he also comes off as unnaturally well-adjusted and, well, happy. His playing is also surprisingly restrained considering his pedigree (Racer X, Mr. Big, etc.) and continued affiliation with the Shrapnel label (the house that shredding built), making for an album filled with songs featuring guitar solos, rather than solos disguised as songs. Despite this commendable attitude and unusually unselfconscious sense of humor, his songwriting as a whole is at best merely competent, at worst rather unimpressive. Still, album standouts like "Bliss," "I Am Satan," and "Amy Is Amazing" are far more memorable than the barrage of 16th notes regularly spewed by his masturbatory competitors -- his preexisting fans won't be disappointed. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2010 | Mascot Records

While most of the guitarists that belonged to the '80s "shred" movement seemed to put instrumental virtuosity first (over writing memorable and hummable songs), there were a few exceptions -- notably Paul Gilbert. Of course, Gilbert can light up a fretboard with his chop-heavy technique when he so desires, but as evidenced with his work as part of Mr. Big, he can also pen an acoustic ditty or power ballad that will make housewives worldwide sing along. On his 2009 release, United States, Gilbert teams up with singer Freddie Nelson, for a set of rockin' tunes that leans heavy on the melodic side of things. Running the gamut from songs that would sound perfectly sung by a contestant on the now defunct Rockstar TV series ("Bad Times Good"), Mr. Big-style rock ("Pulsar"), synth-heavy new wave ("Girl from Omaha"), and Todd Rundgren-esque power pop ("I'm Not Addicted"), United States shows once more the many styles that the chameleon-like Gilbert can adapt to. © Greg Prato /TiVo

Gospel - Released February 25, 2020 | Soulville LLC

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Gospel - Released April 26, 2020 | Paul Gilbert

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Gospel - Released July 22, 2020 | Paul Gilbert