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Pop - Released May 21, 2021 | RCA Records Label

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Pop - Released April 26, 2019 | RCA Records Label

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In the fourth song of her eighth album, Pink alludes to the “attic” in which she locks up everything she keeps secret. But if there is one thing that the Family Portrait vocalist wishes to get out in the open, it is indeed her love for music, regardless of the genre. Through the soul and retro infused Hustle and the electronic nature of Love me Anyway, Pink proves yet again that she is the queen of stylistic variety. For this last track, she pairs up with country singer Chris Stapleton, whilst for Can We Pretend, she is surrounded by electro trio Cash Cash, (who released the sensational Take Me Home in 2013). Among the (numerous) other features on this album are Wrabel on 90 Days, Khalid on Hurts 2B Human, as well as Beck on We Could Have it All. Pink not only adores music in the broad sense of the term, but also appreciates her fellow artists who help her to produce such eclectic musical pieces – much like the multicolored album cover. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Pop/Rock - Released September 18, 2012 | RCA Records Label

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Pop - Released October 13, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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Five years separate Beautiful Trauma from its predecessor, 2012's The Truth About Love -- a half-decade P!nk generally acknowledges in lyrical themes, not musical terms. Chalk this up to a general maturation -- the singer/songwriter is a happily married mother of two, creeping up on her 40th birthday -- but her decision to do little more than nod at contemporary musical trends is deliberate, a reflection of how her hits and audience have crept toward the adult contemporary charts. P!nk isn't entirely ready to enter Adele territory: She's still as liable to curse as croon, she makes the occasional feint toward EDM pop, and has the sense to hire Jack Antonoff, the hitmaker du jour of 2017, as a collaborator. These modern moments are bunched up at the beginning of the record, coalescing around "Revenge" -- a catchy bit of clean funk mussed up by a wildly inappropriate Eminem verse that seems culled from outtakes of The Eminem Show -- giving the false impression that Beautiful Trauma is a livelier album than it is, but once the record slides into the piano-anchored ballad "But We Lost It," it enters an extended stretch where diva showstoppers alternate with delicate folk tunes and icy midtempo pop. Every one of these styles is executed well -- the productions are crisp, not chilly, they're undergirded with genuine feeling that P!nk conveys with her measured performances -- but the cumulative feel is somewhat less than the individual parts. Maybe the culprit is that Beautiful Trauma feels too controlled, with every element in its right place. There's none of the emotional mess that has enlivened some of P!nk's best work, and while this sense of calm may be well earned, it does result in a tamer record. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 12, 2010 | LaFace Records

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Pop - Released February 12, 2021 | RCA Records Label

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Pop/Rock - Released April 4, 2006 | LaFace Records

Although it hardly deserved it, Try This -- P!nk's 2003 sequel to her 2001 artistic and commercial breakthrough, M!ssundaztood -- turned out to be something of a flop, selling considerably less than its predecessor and generating no true hit singles. Perhaps this downturn in sales was due to the harder rock direction she pursued on Try This, perhaps the songs she co-wrote with Rancid's Tim Armstrong weren't quite pop even if they were poppy, perhaps it was just a matter of timing, but the album just didn't click with a larger audience, through no fault of the music, which was the equal to that on M!ssundaztood. When faced with such a commercial disappointment, some artists would crawl back to what made them a star, but not P!nk. Although she does pump up the dance on 2006's I'm Not Dead, it's way too simple to call the album a return to "Get the Party Started" -- P!nk is far too complex to do something so straightforward. No, P!nk is complicated, often seemingly contradictory: she tears down "porno paparazzi girls" like Paris Hilton just as easily as she flaunts her bling on "'Cuz I Can"; she celebrates that "I Got Money Now"; she'll swagger and snarl and swear like a sailor, then turn around and write sweet songs of support to a teenager, or a knowingly melancholy reflection like "I Got Money Now"; she'll collaborate with Britney Spears hitmaker Max Martin on one track, then turn around and bring in the Indigo Girls for support on a stripped-down protest song. She'll try anything, and she does on I'm Not Dead. It Ping-Pongs between dense dancefloor anthems and fuzzy power pop, acoustic folk-rock and anthemic power ballads, hard rock tunes powered by electronic beats and dance tunes sung with the zeal of a rocker. It's not just that P!nk tries a lot of different sounds, it's that she seizes the freedom to hurl insults at both George W. Bush and a sleazoid who tried to pick her up at a bar, or to end a chorus with a chant of "Ice cream, ice cream/We all want ice cream." Far from sounding cow-towed by the reaction to Try This, P!nk sounds liberated, making music that's far riskier and stranger than anything else in mainstream pop in 2006. And it's a testament to her power as both a musician and a persona that for this record, even though she's working with singer/songwriter Butch Walker, Max Martin, and Teddy Geiger's cohort, Billy Mann -- her most mainstream collaborators since LA Reid and Babyface helmed her 2000 debut, Can't Take Me Home -- she sounds the strangest she ever has, and that's a positively thrilling thing to hear. That's because she not only sounds strange, she sounds stronger as a writer and singer, as convincing when she's singing the bluesy, acoustic "The One That Got Away" as when she's taunting and teasing on "Stupid Girls" or "U + Ur Hand" or when she's singing a propulsive piece of pure pop like "Leave Me Alone (I'm Lonely)." In other words, she sounds complex: smart, funny, sexy, catchy, and best of all, surprising and unpredictable. This is the third album in a row where she's thrown a curve ball, confounding expectations by delivering a record that's wilder, stronger, and better than the last. And while that's no guarantee that I'm Not Dead will be a bigger hit than Try This, at least it's proof positive that there are few pop musicians more exciting in the 2000s than P!nk. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 13, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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Five years separate Beautiful Trauma from its predecessor, 2012's The Truth About Love -- a half-decade P!nk generally acknowledges in lyrical themes, not musical terms. Chalk this up to a general maturation -- the singer/songwriter is a happily married mother of two, creeping up on her 40th birthday -- but her decision to do little more than nod at contemporary musical trends is deliberate, a reflection of how her hits and audience have crept toward the adult contemporary charts. P!nk isn't entirely ready to enter Adele territory: She's still as liable to curse as croon, she makes the occasional feint toward EDM pop, and has the sense to hire Jack Antonoff, the hitmaker du jour of 2017, as a collaborator. These modern moments are bunched up at the beginning of the record, coalescing around "Revenge" -- a catchy bit of clean funk mussed up by a wildly inappropriate Eminem verse that seems culled from outtakes of The Eminem Show -- giving the false impression that Beautiful Trauma is a livelier album than it is, but once the record slides into the piano-anchored ballad "But We Lost It," it enters an extended stretch where diva showstoppers alternate with delicate folk tunes and icy midtempo pop. Every one of these styles is executed well -- the productions are crisp, not chilly, they're undergirded with genuine feeling that P!nk conveys with her measured performances -- but the cumulative feel is somewhat less than the individual parts. Maybe the culprit is that Beautiful Trauma feels too controlled, with every element in its right place. There's none of the emotional mess that has enlivened some of P!nk's best work, and while this sense of calm may be well earned, it does result in a tamer record. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released November 12, 2010 | LaFace Records

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Pop/Rock - Released October 28, 2008 | LaFace Records

Richard Thompson compared his bumpy marriage to Linda Thompson to a roller coaster named "the Wall of Death" and Pink picks up this carnivalesque thread, calling her troubled relationship with motocross star Carey Hart a Funhouse on her own entry into a long prestigious line of autobiographical divorce albums that stretches back to Blood on the Tracks. Naturally, Funhouse doesn't have any musical similarities with either Blood or Shoot Out the Lights, but Pink's divorce album is also emotionally different than either of these classics or Marvin Gaye's Here, My Dear. Dylan, Thompson, and Gaye layer their albums with self-recriminations and ruminations, niceties that Pink shrugs off in one song, the brooding "I Don't Believe You." Other songs allude to the pain of the separation but never in a way that digs deep -- the musically fine blues-rocker "Mean" trots out clichés, the delicate spooky Stevie Nicks folk of "Crystal Ball" skirts the divorce, and far from being a primal scream, "Please Don't Leave Me" surges on a Max Martin hook that pushes away the pain. But as Pink makes clear with the album-opening single "So What" -- also co-written with Martin -- she's more than ready to get out of this relationship, thrilled that she's still a rock star, still drinking in the afternoon. That her enthusiastic hedonism kind of contradicts the letter of her Britney-baiting "Stupid Girls" doesn't mean that it violates the spirit, as this is still the same Pink, the one who spits out jokes as she rumbles. This snotty stance is second nature to her, so maybe that's why Funhouse only really clicks when Pink abandons any pretense of mourning her relationship and just cuts loose with galumphing rhythms and schoolyard taunts, the kind that fuel both "So What" and "Bad Influence" and make them instantly indelible. This kind of oversized, obnoxious pop is where Pink's heart is at -- she's ready to party and as long as the tempo is high, Funhouse is a ride, empowered by her post-divorce freedom. In a way, that does make Funhouse unique among divorce albums, as it's the first to concentrate on liberation rather than loss -- but if she was going to go in this direction, Pink may have been better off not pretending that she's bothered by the breakup. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 24, 2018 | Atlantic Records

Pop - Released November 20, 2001 | Arista

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Pop - Released November 30, 2012 | RCA Records Label

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Pop - Released October 24, 2008 | LaFace Records

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Pop - Released April 15, 2016 | RCA Records - Walt Disney Records

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Pop/Rock - Released October 5, 2010 | LaFace Records

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Pop - Released May 21, 2021 | RCA Records Label

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Pop - Released February 20, 2019 | RCA Records Label

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Pop - Released November 10, 2003 | Arista - Legacy

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Pop - Released April 4, 2000 | Arista - LaFace Records

It may be hard to listen to Pink's debut album Can't Take Me Home without hearing TLC, specifically their 1999 album Fanmail. After all, L.A. Reid and Babyface were the executive producers for both albums, and they decided to use a skittering, post-jungle rhythm for the bedrock of these savvy, club-ready dance-pop productions -- a sound exploited expertly on TLC's record. If Can't Take Me Home pales next to Fanmail, it's not Pink's fault, nor is it because the album is sub-par; it's simply because it follows in the footsteps of a record that's as close to a modern classic as contemporary soul gets. Judged as its own entity, Pink's debut is quite strong, even if it isn't perfect. The production is masterminded by Babyface and LA Reid, who oversee such producers as Kevin "She'kspere" Briggs, Terence "Tramp-Baby" Abney, Daryl Simmons, and Tricky (not to be confused with the dark trip-hop genius, of course), and throughout this album, their work sparkles, from the deft layers of drum machines to the sultriness of the slow grooves. For the most part, Pink's performances match that production -- she may not be able to deliver ballads with assurance and soul just yet, but she never over-sings. She also not only has an appealing voice, but displays a fair amount of chops. So, with the production and performances in place, that leaves just the songs. While there are no bad cuts on Can't Take Me Home, there aren't any knock-out punches, either. They're all fairly well-crafted, but they're more ingratiating than immediate, and if dance-pop should be anything, it should be indelible upon at least the second listen, if not the first. Many of the songs on Can't Take Me Home need a few spins before they truly sink in, which is a bit unfortunate. Still, it's not the worst situation in the world, either, especially since a lot of the tunes actually do make an impression with repeated plays. So, Can't Take Me Home doesn't really escape many of the pitfalls of a debut, but thanks to LA Reid and Babyface's production and Pink's engaging talents, it's a promising first effort all the same. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo