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Classical - Released October 9, 2015 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released February 4, 2013 | Warner Classics

Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Year
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Classical - Released June 1, 1997 | Warner Classics

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Concertos - Released October 6, 2003 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released June 2, 2003 | Warner Classics

If the notion persists that Nigel Kennedy is the enfant terrible of classical music -- too rebellious or facile to be taken seriously -- then perhaps it is time to reconsider his categorization. Kennedy's varied interests certainly take him beyond the boundaries of the typical classical performer, and his performance style may be too flamboyant to suit some listeners' tastes. But East Meets East is far from shocking, if understood as an exploration of Eastern European music, presented in a fusion of popular styles without pandering to the classical audience with crossover concessions. Fans of world music and open-minded listeners of any stripe may find something to appreciate here. Appearing with the Polish folk band Kroke and surrounded by several guest artists of international reputation, Kennedy shows that his involvement with this ethnic music is honest, if not always inspired. His playing is forthright and spirited, but sometimes overdone, particularly when his electric violin solos wander into rock clichés. However, Kennedy's occasional excesses are counterbalanced by some fine, expressive playing, most memorably in his unaccompanied track Lost in Time. The musicians play well as an ensemble, perhaps most successfully in the vigorous dance style that reaches maximum frenzy in Kukush. © TiVo
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Classical - Released March 18, 2013 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released May 11, 2018 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
It is not so much a question of Nigel Kennedy meeting Gershwin with some “Maestro Gershwin, I presume” than of Gershwin hitting upon Kennedy in the New York jungle with a “Mister Kennedy, I presume, playing some Gershwin”. The present album is as much by the now classic explorer of jazz-cum-classical music as by Kennedy and, at that, by his jam session colleagues, to wit guitarists Howard Alden and Rolf ‘die Kobra’ Bussalb, bassist Tomasz ‘Insomnia’ Kupiec, as well as flutist David Heath. Hence the fact that though the booklet states all pieces are “arranged by Nigel Kennedy”, the input of all these jazz soloists is nothing less than seminal. Let us say he has arranged the accompaniment sections, written for strings and sometimes piano and harpsichord – both of which Kennedy plays himself, by the bye. His rewritings are epitomised by three main ingredients: the fusion of jazz and classical music, the beautiful melodic influences of Jewish culture and the unique energy of New York City – with a further (and obviously extemporaneous) exploration into Pink Floyd style rock for one of the numbers. A further ingredient is doubtless Kennedy’s personal acquaintanceship with Stéphane Grappelli when he was around 14 years old. Given “that this music evolved as a live project”, writes Kennedy in the liner notes, he “continued along these lines in the studio, thus: no glorious reverb, so that the music is and sounds like five cats playing live in a room. This is the old style of recording, more similar to some of [his] favourite recordings from the 30s and 40s.” Of course, Gershwin would not necessarily always recognise his pieces but certainly he’d have loved the way these musicians have jammed around the notes. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 4, 1999 | Warner Classics

Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released October 2, 2006 | Warner Classics

Nigel Kennedy made quite a reputation for himself as a classical violin virtuoso, though he long expressed an interest in jazz prior to the making of this CD. A number of jazz veterans, including bassist Ron Carter, drummer Jack DeJohnette, pianist Kenny Werner, and tenor saxophonist Joe Lovano (along with several others) are present and provide a stimulating group for Kennedy, who early on in the disc is comparable to Jean-Luc Ponty during the early stages of his career as a leader. But Kennedy seems a bit too conservative throughout much of the date, not taking the kind of chances one would expect of a jazz violinist during his improvisations. Another part of the problem is due to the presence of some rather pedestrian material like Butch Cornell's bland funk vehicle "Sunshine Alley" (which adds organist Lucky Peterson) and the forgettable treatment of "Expansions," featuring Raul Midón's vocal and Kennedy's bizarre use of digital delay on his instrument. Even Horace Silver's hard bop masterpiece "Song for My Father" doesn't reach his potential. Nigel Kennedy demonstrates clearly how hard it is to play jazz convincingly when it is not a major part of his regular playing schedule. © Ken Dryden /TiVo
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Violin Concertos - Released December 23, 2016 | Neue Meister

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Classical - Released October 2, 2000 | Warner Classics

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Chamber Music - Released July 1, 1991 | Chandos

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Classical - Released November 25, 2005 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released June 17, 1996 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released November 1, 1988 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released September 1, 2003 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released November 8, 2010 | Warner Classics

Booklet
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Classical - Released February 25, 2008 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 1997 | Warner Classics