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Classical - Released November 1, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
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Solo Piano - Released February 21, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Distinctions Choc de Classica
Maurizio Pollini revisits Beethoven’s final three sonatas (Op. 109 to 111), forty years after recording the very same score for the first time, a score which sees the composer elevate the genre to dizzying levels of expertise. The Italian pianist explains that ever since January 1977 (the first time he recorded No. 32, Nos. 30 and 31 dating even further back to June 1975), he has continuously discovered an infinite number of details within the material and the structure over the course of the multiple times he has performed the three sonatas. Beethoven strays away from the conventions of the traditional sonata with these, something he had been doing since his Opus 27 (Quasi una fantasia, Moonlight), inserting various astonishing shapes. Thus, variation (Op. 109, Arietta of the Op. 111) and fugue (Op. 110, after that of the Opus 101) assume an innovative importance here, much like other unrestricted episodes where Beethoven appears to be expressing very personal emotions, initiating the Romantic era, where subjectivity reigns over structure. Recorded in concert, Maurizio Pollini brings a surprising amount of urgency (Op. 109) and lyricism (Op. 110) to this release that ensures its place as one of the best Pollini recitals in recent years (Beethoven, Debussy, Chopin). A must-listen. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions Diapason d'or
This 2011 box set contains eight complete recordings of the music of Chopin by Maurizio Pollini. Pollini made these for Deutsche Grammophon between 1972 and 2008, covering the solo works of the Romantic, master composer, which is only fitting for a pianist who first gained wide attention after winning the Chopin International Competition in 1960. Pollini is known for his ability to give weight to Chopin's music, but still bring out its lyricism and refined beauty. © TiVo
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Full Operas - Released January 6, 2017 | Sony Classical

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released January 1, 1984 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Both sets of Chopin's etudes can be as fiendishly difficult for the performer as they are mesmerizing for the listener, yet Maurizio Pollini makes them sound as if they pose no problems whatsoever for him in this 1972 recording. Every one of the etudes is played with easy precision, energy, and an entirely enjoyable musicality that demonstrates why Chopin's etudes are no mere exercises and are as suited to the recital hall as to the practice room. The melody of the famous Etude No. 3 in E major is lyrical and warm, which highlights precisely the challenge posed by Chopin in these brief pieces: bring out an effective melody while mastering an exact technique through repetition. The recording also shows why Pollini is one of the most respected Chopin interpreters of all time. © TiVo
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Solo Piano - Released January 25, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Even for listeners who have venerated the piano playing of Maurizio Pollini ever since he won the Chopin Competition in 1960, even for listeners who have publicly averred that Pollini is bar none the greatest living Chopin player, even for listeners who have worshipped his recordings of Chopin's etudes, preludes, polonaises, ballades, and scherzos, there has always been a gnawing fear that inevitably Pollini would someday get around to recording Chopin's nocturnes. The fear was that for all his intellectual lucidity -- and no one, not even Alfred Brendel, has his level of brilliance -- and for all his invincible technique -- and no one, not even Martha Argerich, has his super human virtuosity -- Pollini has no heart. There were good reasons for that fear. In the more ardent etudes, in the tenderer preludes, in the moodier polonaises, in the more fervent pages of the ballades, in the rapt central sections of the scherzos, Pollini did sometimes seem cool, possibly overly objective, and probably even too reserved. And as he methodically worked his way through Chopin's piano works, what would happen when someday Pollini invariably got around to the nocturnes, the most passionately sensual, deeply emotional, and profoundly spiritual works Chopin ever composed? With the release of Pollini's Nocturnes in 2005, someday arrived -- and it turned out to be far colder than the worst fears. For all his undeniable brilliance and virtuosity, Pollini cannot begin to comprehend the nocturnes. His playing is astoundingly beautiful with the ideal balance between light and shadow and repose and movement, but his light lacks heat, his shadows lack menace, his repose lacks rapture, and his movement lacks release. For all the beauty of his playing -- and captured in Deutsche Grammophon's translucent sound, his performances are surely among the most beautiful ever recorded -- Pollini's playing here is all surface with no heart, no soul, and no spirit, and even those listeners who rank Pollini as one of the three greatest living pianists will have to acknowledge that his Nocturnes are a terrible mistake. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1985 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released February 16, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Why yes indeed, this is a very recent recording of Debussy by Maurizio Pollini (with his own son Daniele at his side for En blanc et en noir), made in late 2016 in Munich's sumptuous Herkulesaal. In it, the old lion of the piano unfurls for us the sumptuous and enigmatic musical tapestry of the Second Book of Debussy's Preludes, finished in 1912: a superlatively delicate pattern, more sketched and suggested than really followed, the pianist being enjoined not to "overdo it". Maurizio Pollini, 74 when the recording was made, can measure his performance out perfectly, and knows how to give the impression that the music is being written and improvised as he plays. And the album closes with En blanc et en noir for two pianos, of which Debussy wrote in 1915: "I have suffered greatly from the long drought imposed upon my brain by the war"; after months of silence, and his work editing Chopin, he entered a period of fevered creativity which continued with the two Books of the Études and the final sonatas. First entitled "Caprices en blanc et noir", the three pieces of En blanc et noir refer neatly to the instrument's keys and, as Debussy writes in 1916, "they aim to draw their colour, their emotion, from the simple piano, like Velasquez's greys". Grey, the fruit of the meeting of black and white... © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released December 2, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Because Beethoven's late piano sonatas are universally revered, performances of these works often invite passionate disagreements about the proper way to interpret them. Such was the case with Maurizio Pollini's recordings (1975-1977), and the controversy surrounding them has never fully abated. While these performances are polished to an extent seldom realized on other recordings, it was this pristine quality itself that invited criticism. Pollini was alleged to have objectified the music and detached himself emotionally from his performances, leaving only cold, analytical readings without a trace of feeling. In defense, it should be pointed out that many previous performances were overly burdened with Romantic interpretations and pretensions, and that Pollini performed a great service by presenting the sonatas in as accurate and clean a manner as possible, without grandiose effects. His performances are astonishingly lucid and flowing, especially in the many contrapuntal passages that regularly appear as features of these works. The last five sonatas are admirably served by Pollini's control and precision, and whatever doubts are held about his emotional involvement may be dismissed when the slow movements of Opp. 109 and 111 are heard. These are sublime performances with a high level of immediacy and skill and are strongly recommended. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 27, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 1999 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released April 7, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Originally released between 1976 and 2007, the offerings in this eight-CD box set represent Maurizio Pollini's exemplary concerto recordings for Deutsche Grammophon, including all of Ludwig van Beethoven's cycle, the two piano concertos by Johannes Brahms, and six of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's masterpieces in performances that rank among the pianist's finest. Pollini's polished playing made these recordings favorites among connoisseurs, who admire his clarity and precision, and the Berlin Philharmonic and the Vienna Philharmonic gave them the richness and radiance of their warm accompaniment. Conducting duties were divided almost evenly between Karl Böhm, Claudio Abbado, and Pollini himself, who directed four of the Mozart concertos from the piano, in the Classical tradition. While fans are likely to own all or most of these recordings in separate releases, whether on vinyl or CD, this set is convenient for collectors who would like to have them all in a space-saving trimline package and would be a generous introduction for new listeners. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1976 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 1984 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)