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Pop - Released June 11, 1986 | Sire - Warner Records

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Pop - Released June 2, 1998 | Warner Records - Maverick

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released January 1, 1983 | Sire - Warner Records

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Pop - Released November 14, 1984 | Sire - Warner Records

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Pop - Released November 14, 1984 | Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released July 15, 1987 | Sire - Warner Records

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Pop - Released April 25, 2008 | Warner Records

Distinctions 4 étoiles Technikart
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Pop - Released April 28, 2008 | Warner Records

Distinctions 4 étoiles Technikart
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Pop - Released June 14, 2019 | Boy Toy, Inc., Exclusively licensed to Live Nation Worldwide, Inc. Exclusively licensed to Interscop

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Madame X marks the reunion between Madonna and Mirwais, the latter being behind the wheel for 7 of the 13 tracks on the album. Daniel Darc's former colleague from Taxi Girl had already worked on several projects, such as the albums Music in 2000 and American Life in 2003. His role here is to take the delirious musical experimentation to new extremes, all the while keeping in line with Madonna's melodic pop style. The most obvious example of Mirwais’ musical madness is Dark Ballet, a song inspired by Joan of Arc that features a long synthetic-baroque arrangement à la Wendy Carlos as well as a mischievous monologue by Madonna that’s told from the point of view of the Maid of Orléans. Maintaining a style that’s both playful and totally insane, the lively disco strings on God Control are a real highlight. Madonna is also politically engaged in this work, focusing on the failed gun control in America (with a sample from Emma Gonzales’ speech in I Rise) as well as speaking out for minorities (particularly in the postmodern fado Killers Who Are Partying). Speaking of fado, Lusophone culture is one of the album’s main themes – probably due to Madonna’s decision to move to Portugal in 2017. On Batuka she celebrates Cape Verde (the batuque being a kind of Cape Verdean music characterised by a call and response structure). Madonna also pays tribute to Colombia with the reggaeton singer Maluma, with whom she sings (and flirts) on two duets: Medellin and Bitch I'm Loca. Finally, she also mentions Picasso's Spain on I Don't Search I Find (quoted from the painter). The album highlights the malleable aspect of her voice (be it auto-tuned, whispered or spoken) and throughout the work Madonna always strikes a perfect balance between the gravity of political commitment on the one hand and the lightness of the duets and Mirwais’ production on the other. She does complete justice album’s title, Madame X most likely being a reference to Marlene Dietrich from Agent X 27, Joseph Von Sternberg's 1931 biopic of the spy Mata Hari. “Madame X is a secret agent, travelling around the world, changing identities and fighting for freedom. She brings light to dark places,” explained the singer in a teaser video for her project. It’s a masked, playful, freedom-fighting and confident Madonna that we find here as she enters her seventh decade. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Pop - Released September 18, 2009 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released November 9, 1990 | Sire - Warner Records

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Pop - Released November 14, 2005 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released September 18, 2000 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released March 17, 1989 | Sire - Warner Records

Out of all of Madonna's albums, Like a Prayer is her most explicit attempt at a major artistic statement. Even though it is apparent that she is trying to make a "serious" album, the kaleidoscopic variety of pop styles on Like a Prayer is quite dazzling. Ranging from the deep funk of "Express Yourself" and "Keep It Together" to the haunting "Oh Father" and "Like a Prayer," Madonna displays a commanding sense of songcraft, making this her best and most consistent album. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released April 21, 2003 | Warner Records - Maverick

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Pop - Released January 1, 1995 | Warner Records

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Pop - Released October 14, 1994 | Sire - Warner Records

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Pop - Released March 10, 2015 | Interscope

Rebel Heart was introduced to the world with an indiscipline uncharacteristic of Madonna. Blame it on hackers who rushed out a clutch of unfinished tracks at the end of 2014, a few months before the record's scheduled spring release. Madonna countered by putting six full tracks up on a digital service, a move that likely inflated the final Deluxe Edition of Rebel Heart up to a whopping 19 tracks weighing in at 75 minutes, but even that unveiling wasn't performed without a hitch: during an ornate performance of "Living for Love," she stumbled on-stage at the BRIT Awards. Such cracks in Madge's armor happily play into the humanity coursing through Rebel Heart (maybe the hiccups were intentional after all?), a record that ultimately benefits from its daunting mess. All the extra space allows ample room for detours, letting Madonna indulge in both Erotica-era taboo-busting sleaze ("Holy Water") and feather-light pop ("Body Shop"). Although she takes a lingering look back at the past on "Veni Vidi Vici" -- her cataloging of past hits walks right on the edge of camp, kept away from the danger zone by a cameo from Nas -- Rebel Heart, like any Madonna album, looks forward. Opener "Living for Love" announces as much, as its classic disco is soon exploded into a decibel-shattering EDM pulse coming courtesy of co-producer Diplo. Madonna brings him back a few more times -- the pairing of the reggae-bouncing "Unapologetic Bitch" and Nicki Minaj showcase "Bitch I'm Madonna," their titles suggesting vulgarity, their execution flinty and knowing -- but she cleverly balances these clubby bangers with "Devil Pray," an expert evocation of her folktronica Y2K co-produced by Avicii, and "Illuminati," a sleek, spooky collaboration with Kanye West. These are the anchors of the album, grounding the record when Madonna wanders into slow-churning meditation, unabashed revivals of her '90s adult contemporary mode, casual confession ("I spent sometime as a narcissist"), and defiant celebrations of questionable taste. Undoubtedly, some of this flair would've been excised if the record was a manageable length, but the blessing of the unwieldiness is that it does indeed represent a loosening of Madonna's legendary need for control. Certainly, the ambition remains, along with the hunger to remain on the bleeding edge, but she's allowing her past to mingle with her present, allowing her to seem human yet somewhat grander at the same time. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2012 | Interscope

Most pop stars reach a point where they accept the slow march of time, but not Madonna. Time is Madonna's enemy -- an enemy to be battled or, better still, one to be ignored. She soldiers on, turning tougher, harder, colder with each passing album, winding up with a record as flinty as MDNA, the 2012 record that is her first release since departing Warner for Interscope. That's hardly the only notable shift in Madonna's life since the 2008 release of Hard Candy. Since then, she has divorced film director Guy Ritchie and has seen her '80s persona co-opted and perverted by Lady Gaga, events so cataclysmic she can't help but address them on MDNA. Madonna hits the divorce dead-on, muttering about "pre-nups" when she's not fiercely boasting of shooting her lover in the head, and she's not exactly shy about reasserting her dominion over dance and pop, going so far as to draft Nicki Minaj and M.I.A. as maid servants paying their respect to the queen. Whatever part of MDNA that isn't devoted to divorce is dedicated to proving that Madonna remains the preeminent pop star, working harder than anybody to stay just on the edge of the vanguard. All this exertion leads to an excessively lean album: there's not an ounce of fat on MDNA, it's all overly defined muscle, every element working with designated purpose. Such steely precision means there's no warmth on MDNA, not even when Madonna directly confesses emotions she's previously avoided, but the cool calculations here are preferable to the electronic mess of Hard Candy, not least because there's a focus that flows all the way down to the pop hooks, which are as strong and hard as those on Confessions on a Dance Floor even if they're not quite so prominent as they were on that 2005 retro-masterwork. MDNA does echo the Euro-disco vibe of Confessions -- "Love Spent" consciously reworks the ABBA-sampling "Hung Up" -- yet as a whole it feels chillier, possibly due to that defensive undercurrent that pervades the album. Even if she's only measuring it in terms of pretenders to her throne, Madonna is aware of time passing yet she's compelled to fight it, to stay on top, to not slow down, to not waste a second of life, to keep working because the meaning of life is work, not pleasure. Naturally, all that labor can pay off, whether it's through the malevolent pulse of "Gang Bang" or the clever "Beautiful Stranger" rewrite "I'm a Sinner," but, ironically for all of Madonna's exhausting exertion elsewhere, these are the songs that benefit from her finely honed skills as a pop craftsman, illustrating that no matter how she combats it, she can't escape her age and may indeed be better off just embracing it. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 16, 1992 | Sire - Warner Records

While it didn't set the charts on fire like her previous albums, the ambitious Erotica contains some of Madonna's best and most accomplished music (including the hit singles "Deeper and Deeper" and "Rain"), even if it runs a bit long. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo