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Rock - Released January 1, 1996 | EMI

Using the postmodern torch music of Portishead as a foundation, Lamb spin out into new sonic territories on their eponymous debut album. The group sports a heavier techno influence, incorporating the buzzing rhythms of drum'n'bass into their music in particular, yet they cut their modernistic electronic influences with a dark sense of melodicism. Most of the album is devoted to jazzy songs that are broken apart by Andy Barlow's synthesizers and sampler and are anchored by Louise Rhodes' seductive vocals, which prevent the electronics from becoming cold. It's sophisticated urban music, one that's miles away from the avant-garde sensibilities of Tricky and the haunted romanticism of Portishead, or even the pop leanings of Sneaker Pimps and the soul-inflected grooves of Morcheeba. Instead, Lamb is classy, detached, and cool -- a more club-oriented and less melodic variation of Everything but the Girl's Walking Wounded. Although Lamb may run a little long, it's one of the more hypnotic byproducts of trip-hop yet released. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2001 | EMI

Still one of the most inventive groups in electronica, Lamb continued pushing the boundaries of singer/songwriter drum'n'bass three albums in, and also came to grips with a few of the growing pains of their sophomore album. Even while Andy Barlow's productions again set a gold standard for ambitious, evocative, intelligent accompaniment, Louise Rhodes' vocals have improved noticeably since the occasionally over-reaching Fear of Fours. Yes, her crying, confessional style of delivery can still wear (especially for a genre never overly enthusiastic about vocals to begin with), but she's obviously gained in control without sacrificing intensity. The opener, "What Sound," begins with a set of tender love lyrics, gradually expanding with orchestral strings and Barlow's tight, stop-time production. The paranoid breaks of "One" give way to a downright extroverted performance on "Sweet," though Rhodes saves her most pained vocals for the very next track, "I Cry." Barlow scorches on the Chemicals-style breaks and furious turntablism of "Scratch Bass," but then comes right back with a pair of beautiful ballads directed inwards. He's also unafraid to keep the backing (relatively) simple, even on the single "Gabriel." It's clear that every beat, every effect has been labored over, but thankfully that impression is an unconscious one. Another nice touch: the admirably low-profile appearances by excellent musicians like Arto Lindsay on guitar, Me'Shell NdegéOcello on bass, and Michael Franti on vocals. If there were any doubters about Lamb being the brightest, most talented singer/producer combo in electronica, What Sound is all the argument needed to the contrary. © John Bush /TiVo
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Electronic - Released April 26, 2019 | Cooking Vinyl Limited

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Electronic - Released October 13, 2014 | Cooking Vinyl Limited

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Electronic - Released July 3, 2020 | Cooking Vinyl Limited

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Rock - Released January 1, 1999 | EMI

While their debut was practically a revolution in the development of a satisfactory fusion of singer/songwriter vocals and drum'n'bass, Lamb's second album sets the bar much higher. As on the band's debut, Andy Barlow proves he's one of the most capable and inventive producers in the electronic community. He also still sounds inspired by the fiery side of bop as well as more muted chamber music, from the dexterous synthetic bass and intricate drum programs on "Little Things" to the restrained beats and orchestral tug of "All in Your Hands" and "Bonfire." Similar to the rather deflated return of Portishead in 1997, though, Fear of Fours suffers from Louise Rhodes' tendencies to play up her voice as a torch diva, overemoting and often coming off as girlish or whiny on many tracks. Thank goodness, then, for lengthy instrumentals like "Ear Parcel," which begins with the pastoral sounds of twinkling bells and croaking frogs but later whips up a few frenzied breakbeats as a bed for a sampled trumpet solo. © John Bush /TiVo
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Electronic - Released May 5, 2011 | Cooking Vinyl Limited

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Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | EMI

While their debut was practically a revolution in the development of a satisfactory fusion of singer/songwriter vocals and drum'n'bass, Lamb's second album sets the bar much higher. As on the band's debut, Andy Barlow proves he's one of the most capable and inventive producers in the electronic community. He also still sounds inspired by the fiery side of bop as well as more muted chamber music, from the dexterous synthetic bass and intricate drum programs on "Little Things" to the restrained beats and orchestral tug of "All in Your Hands" and "Bonfire." Similar to the rather deflated return of Portishead in 1997, though, Fear of Fours suffers from Louise Rhodes' tendencies to play up her voice as a torch diva, overemoting and often coming off as girlish or whiny on many tracks. Thank goodness, then, for lengthy instrumentals like "Ear Parcel," which begins with the pastoral sounds of twinkling bells and croaking frogs but later whips up a few frenzied breakbeats as a bed for a sampled trumpet solo. © John Bush /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 18, 2003 | EMI

Once the most intriguing act fusing electronica with singer/songwriter pop, Lamb unfortunately impress much less on their fourth album than they did in the past. While Louise Rhodes' vocals still lie on the acceptable side of eccentric, Andy Barlow's productions have been defanged; no longer surprising and innovative, they exist as merely proper frameworks for the songs. The long roster here of Pro Tools engineers and studio players makes much of the difference, adding a next-generation sound to the work but eliminating the freshness Lamb productions used to possess. A pair of introspective, experimental pieces ("Darkness," "Stronger") make for a brilliant beginning, but the rest of the record includes a few tender acoustic ballads ("Angelica" is the best) that barely profit from the programmed percussion, and a compelling but nearly meaningless update of Claude Debussy's "Clair de Lune." Between Darkness and Wonder is hardly a tragedy in Lamb's discography, but the duo's longtime ability to sacrifice neither pop smarts nor production bite was a hallmark that no other act could lay claim to. © John Bush /TiVo
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Electronic - Released September 28, 2020 | LAMB

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Pop - Released January 1, 2001 | EMI

Still one of the most inventive groups in electronica, Lamb continued pushing the boundaries of singer/songwriter drum'n'bass three albums in, and also came to grips with a few of the growing pains of their sophomore album. Even while Andy Barlow's productions again set a gold standard for ambitious, evocative, intelligent accompaniment, Louise Rhodes' vocals have improved noticeably since the occasionally over-reaching Fear of Fours. Yes, her crying, confessional style of delivery can still wear (especially for a genre never overly enthusiastic about vocals to begin with), but she's obviously gained in control without sacrificing intensity. The opener, "What Sound," begins with a set of tender love lyrics, gradually expanding with orchestral strings and Barlow's tight, stop-time production. The paranoid breaks of "One" give way to a downright extroverted performance on "Sweet," though Rhodes saves her most pained vocals for the very next track, "I Cry." Barlow scorches on the Chemicals-style breaks and furious turntablism of "Scratch Bass," but then comes right back with a pair of beautiful ballads directed inwards. He's also unafraid to keep the backing (relatively) simple, even on the single "Gabriel." It's clear that every beat, every effect has been labored over, but thankfully that impression is an unconscious one. Another nice touch: the admirably low-profile appearances by excellent musicians like Arto Lindsay on guitar, Me'Shell NdegéOcello on bass, and Michael Franti on vocals. If there were any doubters about Lamb being the brightest, most talented singer/producer combo in electronica, What Sound is all the argument needed to the contrary. © John Bush /TiVo
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Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 1995 | Sparrow

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Pop - Released January 1, 2003 | EMI

Once the most intriguing act fusing electronica with singer/songwriter pop, Lamb unfortunately impress much less on their fourth album than they did in the past. While Louise Rhodes' vocals still lie on the acceptable side of eccentric, Andy Barlow's productions have been defanged; no longer surprising and innovative, they exist as merely proper frameworks for the songs. The long roster here of Pro Tools engineers and studio players makes much of the difference, adding a next-generation sound to the work but eliminating the freshness Lamb productions used to possess. A pair of introspective, experimental pieces ("Darkness," "Stronger") make for a brilliant beginning, but the rest of the record includes a few tender acoustic ballads ("Angelica" is the best) that barely profit from the programmed percussion, and a compelling but nearly meaningless update of Claude Debussy's "Clair de Lune." Between Darkness and Wonder is hardly a tragedy in Lamb's discography, but the duo's longtime ability to sacrifice neither pop smarts nor production bite was a hallmark that no other act could lay claim to. © John Bush /TiVo
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Humour/Spoken Word - Released September 13, 2011 | Galilee of the Nations

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Electronic - Released September 13, 2017 | LAMB

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Electronic - Released May 3, 2015 | Cooking Vinyl Limited

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Rock - Released February 10, 2017 | Columbia - Legacy

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Humour/Spoken Word - Released September 13, 2011 | Galilee of the Nations

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Electronic - Released September 15, 2014 | Cooking Vinyl Limited

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released February 1, 2020 | Alln Committee