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Opera Extracts - Released October 6, 2017 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released August 7, 2015 | Decca

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released January 1, 2012 | Decca

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | Decca

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

A great vehicle for its star, Juan Diego Flórez, this beautifully engineered and nicely packaged live version of Rossini's Le Comte Ory from the 2003 Rossini Opera Festival is also a good all-around representation of the opera. Led by Jesús López-Cobos, and featuring a solid cast, it strikes an effective balance between clean musical presentation and comic energy, and manages to be entertaining through most of its two hours. Flórez's charismatic performance as the scheming Ory is the main reason to check out this DG release, and what elevates it from being just another good recording to a top consideration for this piece. His singing here is every bit as polished as can be heard on his more manicured solo recordings, with the same ringing tone and easy top range. Flórez also reveals an incisive, take-charge musicianship that is easier to appreciate in the context of a complete opera. His coloratura is rock solid, his sense of line and style is perfect, and he lets the smile in his voice take care of the comedy instead of hamming it up. Stefania Bonfadelli tackles the rangy and often busy role of the Countess capably, though her voice is too heavy to be ideal for the part, and she often gets bogged down in passages of coloratura as a result. The dark-voiced Alastair Miles is entertaining and perfectly cast as Ory's stern Tutor. As the page, Isolier, Marie-Ange Todorovitch is appealing and suitably androgynous, although she doesn't compete for much attention in ensembles where the better-focused sounds of Flórez and Bonfadelli take center stage. The rest of the cast contributes nicely, and the Orchestra del Teatro Comunale di Bologna plays well under López-Cobos, if without some of the sparkle you want from a Rossini orchestra. The Prague Chamber Choir is unusually tight for a live opera chorus. In the end, choosing this recording over the others available on the market comes down to taste. But Flórez's world-class singing should at least put it near the top of the list.
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Classical - Released January 1, 2010 | Decca

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Classical - Released March 20, 2006 | Decca

This is a nice change of pace from the crossover discs often released by young operatic sensations. Sentimiento Latino offers appealing romantic songs in Spanish that anyone can enjoy (although, at least on the U.S. release, translations are into English only). But they're not done-to-death chestnuts. Rather, the Peruvian tenor has picked Latin American standards from the first half of the twentieth century -- music his grandparents might have known. A few, like Siboney and México lindo, are well known internationally, but others, including several by Peruvian singer and songwriter Chabuca Granda, are less familiar. (Check out her Fina estampa, track 10, for a delightful number in which Flórez feels completely at home.) Flórez reins in his powerful voice so as not to overwhelm the modest dimensions of these songs or his accompaniment by the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra, augmented as needed by a mariachi band, a tango bandoneón player, a guitarist, and other instrumentalists from indigenous Latin traditions. His famed high notes are perhaps all the more thrilling to hear in this restricted context, for he slides into them with a remarkable, understated smoothness. There are a few numbers to which Flórez doesn't quite make a connection -- Agustín Lara's Granada seems composed of unrelated sections in his performance. In general, though, this is a superior crossover disc for anyone who likes Flórez or the good old days of Latin American song.
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Classical - Released January 1, 2006 | Decca

This is a nice change of pace from the crossover discs often released by young operatic sensations. Sentimiento Latino offers appealing romantic songs in Spanish that anyone can enjoy (although, at least on the U.S. release, translations are into English only). But they're not done-to-death chestnuts. Rather, the Peruvian tenor has picked Latin American standards from the first half of the twentieth century -- music his grandparents might have known. A few, like Siboney and México lindo, are well known internationally, but others, including several by Peruvian singer and songwriter Chabuca Granda, are less familiar. (Check out her Fina estampa, track 10, for a delightful number in which Flórez feels completely at home.) Flórez reins in his powerful voice so as not to overwhelm the modest dimensions of these songs or his accompaniment by the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra, augmented as needed by a mariachi band, a tango bandoneón player, a guitarist, and other instrumentalists from indigenous Latin traditions. His famed high notes are perhaps all the more thrilling to hear in this restricted context, for he slides into them with a remarkable, understated smoothness. There are a few numbers to which Flórez doesn't quite make a connection -- Agustín Lara's Granada seems composed of unrelated sections in his performance. In general, though, this is a superior crossover disc for anyone who likes Flórez or the good old days of Latin American song.
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Classical - Released January 1, 2002 | Decca

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Classical - Released September 1, 2016 | Decca

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Classical - Released August 7, 2015 | Decca

Booklet
Juan Diego Flórez developed a special love for the Italian and Neapolitan songs he learned from listening to recordings by his idols, Enrico Caruso and Luciano Pavarotti, and they were the inspiration for Italia, his 2015 collection on Decca. Flórez possesses a smooth and warm tenor voice that is well-suited to this amorous and sentimental repertoire, sounding intimate and romantic in his low to middle range but rising to passionate intensity in his highest notes. Many familiar songs are here, including the classics 'O Sole Mio, Mattinata, Nel blu, dipinto di blu (Volare), and Arrivederci, Roma, along with a smattering of operatic arias by Rossini and Donizetti, so Flórez is able to demonstrate both his pop side as well and his skills as one of the world's leading bel canto singers. Guest artists include mandolin virtuoso Avi Avital, accordionist Ksenija Sidorova, and guitarists Guido Sodo, Walter Zanetti, and Craig Ogden, and Flórez is accompanied by the Filarmonica Gioachino Rossini, conducted by Carlo Tenan.
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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Decca

On his third aria collection for Decca, Juan Diego Flórez continues to stretch his repertory beyond the Rossini roles that established his solo career. But he never strays far, wisely sticking to roles that suit his light, gracious sound, and which make the most of his exhilarating top notes without requiring dramatic heft. Flórez is a truly special singer, one of the best put together young tenors around, and Great Tenor Arias shows him off to great effect. Despite the album's title, very few of the selections included are from the usual Tenors hit parade; only Verdi's "La donna è mobile" from Rigoletto will be familiar to the casual listener. Coincidentally, that aria is the only real misfire on the album -- which is not to say Flórez sings it badly; rather, his tone is just too likable, too boyishly friendly, to capture the spirit of one of opera's most notorious bad guys. But almost every other selection on the album is spot on vocally, musically, and in character. Hearing Flórez tear into the florid coloratura of Rossini's Semiramide can't help but bring a smile to your face. His "J'ai perdu mon Euridice" from the less-often heard French version of Gluck's Orphée et Euridice shows him tackling a difficult "haute-contre" tessitura with no trouble. And his "Firenze è come un albero fiorito" from Puccini's Gianni Schicchi (probably the only Puccini role Flórez is likely to sing) has the perfect blend of youthful enthusiasm and vocal thrust. In general, this collection shows that Flórez has a more colorful palette at his disposal than many light tenors. His high notes have ring and a visceral "tug," and he can sing softly without sacrificing energy or intensity. Carlo Rizzi and the Orchestra Sinfonica e Coro di Milano Giuseppe Verdi are deluxe partners for Flórez. Great Tenor Arias is a highly enjoyable listen, and an impressive step in this young singer's career.
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Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Decca

Bel Canto Spectacular, a recital featuring tenor Juan Diego Flórez, delivers exactly what it promises: a spectacular release of vocal showpieces by one of the rising superstars of the early 21st century, singing scenes and arias by the great bel canto composers, Rossini, Bellini, and Donizetti. Flórez's voice is not particularly large, but he has a terrific, agile technique, a warmly enveloping tone, and a dramatic flair for fully inhabiting these operatic characters. He also has a sure grasp on the stylistic conventions of this repertoire and knows how to exploit them without going overboard. The album opens with "Amici mei," from La figlia del reggimento, an aria that helped secure his reputation because of his confident delivery of its multiple high Cs. He is equally impressive in the more lyrical selections, such as "Una furtive lagrima," to which he brings an especially sweet, limpid tone. Flórez is joined in some of the scenes by artists of the caliber of Plácido Domingo, Anna Netrebko, and Mariusz Kwiecien; mezzo-soprano Daniela Barcellona is not quite in their league in a rare but delightful duet from Il viaggio a Reims. Domingo is featured on a bonus track, the duet, "Ah, vieni, nel tuo sangui," from Otello. Daniel Oren leads Orquestra de la Comunitat Valenciana in sensitive accompaniment. Decca's sound is clean and present with good balance.
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Classical - Released January 1, 2010 | Decca

Booklet
This album of sacred vocal music sung by Juan Diego Flórez offers so many pleasures that's it's hard to know here to begin describing them. Flórez is in superb form; his clarion tenor has a youthful gleam, and he sings with purity and an intensity that's entirely unforced. It's a joy to hear him bring a subtle Italianate flair to selections from Messiah, which come across as refreshingly heroic and red-blooded. The choice of repertoire is a delight; too often the religious albums that opera stars seem required to turn out can smack of pious gravity, but Flórez's selections have a wonderful variety and are even weighted toward the lively. Some of the obligatory standards, like Franck's Panis Angelicus, Adam's Cantique de Noël, and Schubert's Ave Maria are included, and Flórez sings them with a commitment and freshness that make them sound new. The obscure and relatively obscure pieces by Fux, Rossini, and Bellini are revelations. The Bellini and Rossini are home turf for Flórez and he sings these arias with the same sparkle and wit he brings to their comic operas. Bellini's Qui sedes (Who sittest) from his Mass in A minor must be one of the very perkiest settings ever made of this section of the Credo. There isn't much evidence of any sitting going on in the music; it sounds more like brightly garbed peasants gaily frolicking around a sun-splashed village square on a feast day. Flórez includes two songs in Spanish, the Kyrie from Ariel Ramírez's Missa Criolla and Flórez's own Santo, a setting of the Sanctus that also includes sections in the Quechua language. A lovely, imaginative marriage of Western and Latin musical traditions, it's a piece with real substance and Flórez sings it with great spirit. Adeste Fideles is the only track where Flórez sounds a little too operatically over-the-top. Michele Mariotti leads the Chorus and Orchestra of Teatro Comunale di Bologna in lively, nicely shaded accompaniment. Decca's sound is excellent: clean, present, and well balanced. Highly recommended.
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Classical - Released September 1, 2016 | Decca

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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Decca

In this collection, Flórez highlights the operatic and song repertoire that showcases his strengths -- a pure, light, but substantial instrument with a ringing top, a velvety legato, technical security, and an absolute grasp of the idiomatic requirements of the music. His performance should delight fans of old-fashioned bel canto singing. He includes enough rarities to keep the disc from being just another greatest-hits-for-lyric-tenor album: the tango-inflected "Amapola," an Argentinean song accompanied by a folk ensemble, the quintessentially Mexican/Spanish song "Granada," and selections from seldom-performed operas like Rossini's Otello, Verdi's Un Giorno di Regno, and Donizetti's Rita. He dazzles in the traditional selections; "La donna é mobile" and "Una furtiva lagrima" are models of youthful lyrical outbursts, one arrogant and callow, the other despairing. Some of the arias fall outside his usual repertoire; "Se di regnar sei vago," from Mozart's Mitridate, is especially impressive, and "J'ai perdu mon Euridice" is vocally gorgeous, but a little emotionally overcharged for Gluck's Classicism. Flórez is fully equipped to toss off the coloratura demands of the repertoire, particularly the Rossini arias, with ease and panache. In La fille du régiment's "Pour mon âme quel destin!," however, Flórez has to deliver the high Cs with a punch, unlike Pavarotti, who could float them apparently effortlessly. These small quibbles aside, Flórez's performances are a delight. The widely diverse accompanying ensembles are consistently fine. Orchestra Sinfonica e Coro di Milano Giuseppe Verdi, conducted in various selections by Carlo Rizzi, Riccardo Frizza, and Riccardo Chailly, as well as Les Talens Lyriques led by Christophe Rousset and the Fort Worth Symphony led by Miguel Harth-Bedoya support Flórez with sensitivity and conviction. The sound is somewhat variable between tracks, due to the various recording venues, but for the most part it's clean and well balanced, if a little bright.
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Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Decca

Booklet
On L'Amour, his 2014 release on Decca, Peruvian tenor Juan Diego Flórez presents a delightful collection of 12 virtuoso arias from French operas of the 19th century, demonstrating both his skill in bel canto ornamentation and his impeccable delivery. The selections are drawn from both well-known and obscure operas, including Boieldieu's La Dame blanche, Bizet's La jolie fille de Perth, Donizetti's La favorita (set to a French libretto), Berlioz's Les Troyens, Adam's Le Postillon de Lonjumeau, Delibes' Lakmé, Massenet's Werther, Thomas' Mignon, Offenbach's La belle Hélène, and Gounod's Roméo et Juliette, showing the variety of expressions and styles of the period. These arias are ideal for a light tenor voice, and Flórez soars with ease in his upper tessitura, gaining power the higher he goes, though his lowest notes need more support. His voice has a bright, open quality that works well in lyrical music, and he could play youthful romantic roles for some time to come with his great flexibility and energy. Flórez is accompanied by the Orchestra and Chorus of the Teatro Comunale di Bologna, who give a truly operatic experience to this disc, and the vibrant performances provide more than an accompaniment for Flórez. Decca's recorded sound is full and rich.
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Classical - Released September 14, 2007 | Universal Music

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Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released January 1, 2007 | Decca