Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES£16.79
CD£11.19

Blues - Released August 7, 2020 | J&R Adventures

Hi-Res
With A New Day Now, Joe Bonamassa revisits his debut album A New Day Yesterday. The American bluesman has even rerecorded his vocal parts. According to him, the reason behind this project relates to the lack of experience and rigour that can be heard on the original record. The first release by the young man, then aged 22, came ten years after his noteable performance as the support act for B.B. King and marked the beginning of his artistic blossoming. For Bonamassa, this retrospective album is also an homage to producer Tom Dowd, his former mentor whose demanding approach, both technically and musically, helped him to progress from a child prodigy to the best bluesman of his generation. © IF/Qobuz
HI-RES£13.19
CD£8.79

Blues - Released October 23, 2020 | J&R Adventures

Hi-Res
Recorded in the legendary Abbey Road studios, Royal Tea introduces the American guitarist the legendary London venue which gave birth to While My Guitar Gently Weeps, the prolific collaboration between the Beatles and Eric Clapton in the summer of 1968. Realising a long-term ambition, Joe Bonamassa finds himself in the perfect environment to pay homage to one of his major influences: the British Blues Boom headed by legends Clapton, John Mayall, Peter Green and Jeff Beck. For the occasion, the bluesman is surrounded by guests and a variety of instruments. In addition to Kevin Shirley as guest producer, we note the presence of Berne Marsden from Whitesnake, Cream singer Pete Brown, Eurythmics’ Dave Stewart and Jools Holland on keys. The modest vintage instruments used on this record were carefully chosen on Denmark Street, famous for its vintage guitars. This languid blues-rock album, composed of ten tracks, reaches its emotional climax with Why Does It Take So Long to Say Goodbye, in which JoBo’s solos are backed by feminine choirs. A work that will fit well among the guitarist’s impressive discography as his virtuosity never ceases to improve and who’s debut album A New Day Now turns twenty years old in 2020! © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
CD£8.79

Blues - Released October 6, 2009 | J&R Adventures

CD£7.99

Blues - Released June 9, 2009 | J&R Adventures

CD£8.79

Blues - Released October 25, 2019 | J&R Adventures

CD£9.59

Blues - Released September 21, 2018 | J&R Adventures

One, two, three! That’s right, three albums in a single year for Joe Bonamassa! Following his collaboration with Beth Hart on Black Coffee and his British Blues Explosion Live, the Gibson man absolves himself of his sins with a thirteenth studio album: Redemption. Here we find a collection of original tracks that, before going around the world, went around countless recording studios! Nashville, Sydney, Las Vegas and Miami all played a part in the creation of this album produced by Kevin Shirley. The album opens with an evil blues-rock influenced by rockabilly styles (Evil Mama), then later on we have a sensually groovy saxophone on Pick Up The Pieces and a melancholy tune on acoustic guitar (Stronger Now In Broken Places), as Bonamassa clears his conscience. With Tom Hambridge, James House, Gary Nicholson, Richard Page and legendary Dion DiMucci, he offers a twelve-track redemption that could stand the test of time. Looking past his technical skill, Joe Bonamassa’s song-writing ability truly shines through on this album. © Anna Coluthe/Qobuz
CD£12.79

Blues - Released June 27, 2017 | J&R Adventures

CD£8.79

Blues - Released October 23, 2020 | J&R Adventures

CD£9.59

Blues - Released March 22, 2011 | J&R Adventures

For his second solo album in a year -- not counting his excursion with Black Country Communion -- Joe Bonamassa, the hardest working blues-rock guitarist of the 21st century, strikes up a bit of a smoky Black Keys vibe, signaling that he’s not quite as devoted to the past as he may initially seem. It’s not the only trick he has up his sleeve, either. Appropriately enough for an album entitled Dust Bowl, Bonamassa kicks up some country dirt on this record, enlisting John Hiatt for a duet on the songwriter’s “Tennessee Plates” and bringing Vince Gill in to play on the lazy shuffle “Sweet Rowena.” These are accents to an album that otherwise sticks to Bonamassa’s strong suit of blues in the vein of Cream, Stevie Ray, and Gary Moore, but it’s just enough of a difference to give Dust Bowl a distinctive flavor and suggests that the guitarist’s constant work is pushing him to synthesize his clear influences into something that is uniquely his own. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD£11.99

Blues - Released March 25, 2013 | J&R Adventures

HI-RES£19.19
CD£12.79

Blues - Released May 18, 2018 | J&R Adventures

Hi-Res
CD£16.79

Blues - Released September 24, 2012 | J&R Adventures

Joe Bonamassa is a guitar hero and a road dog -- the blues-rock crusher plays up to 200 shows a year, and it's significant that of the 15 albums he released between 2000 and 2012, four of them were live sets. When Bonamassa played the Beacon Theatre in New York City in November 2011, the marquee declared it "the guitar event of the year," and something that important would certainly merit another live album, wouldn't it? Beacon Theatre: Live from New York is a hefty two-disc set that features plenty of Bonamassa's trademark guitar work, at once precise and bombastic and firmly rooted in the traditions of British blues, and for this show he had Paul Rodgers on hand to lend appropriately swaggering lead vocals to a pair of Free covers, "Fire and Water" and "Walk in My Shadows." Two other guest singers pop up on this set: John Hiatt, whose craggy tone lends a welcome bit of texture to versions of two of his tunes, "Down Around My Place" and "I Know a Place," and Beth Hart, who has collaborated with Bonamassa in the past and lends her voice to spirited versions of "Sinner's Prayer" and "I'll Take Care of You." There's no arguing the technical skill of Bonamassa and his band (Carmine Rojas on bass, Rick Melick on keys, and Tal Bergman on drums), who perform with the accuracy of a Swiss watch, but some might question his taste -- there's nothing the least bit subtle about Bonamassa's big, burly sound, and the emotional shadings of these songs are pretty much trampled into the dirt by the end of disc one, while the presence of the guest stars unfortunately reminds listeners that Bonamassa's vocals are not on a par with his skills on the fretboard. But if you're already a convert, Beacon Theatre: Live from New York finds Bonamassa playing with all his might for a crowd who are clearly digging what he has to offer, and if, like many of his fans, you're convinced he sounds stronger and more powerful on-stage, this album will tide you over nicely until he next rolls into your area. © Mark Deming /TiVo
CD£12.79

Blues - Released September 23, 2016 | J&R Adventures

CD£7.99

Blues - Released August 21, 2007 | J&R Adventures

CD£9.59

Blues - Released February 24, 2009 | J&R Adventures

CD£7.99

Blues - Released August 7, 2014 | J&R Adventures

CD£7.99

Blues - Released June 9, 2009 | J&R Adventures

Despite his statement in the liner notes that "In an era where it is best to play it safe, I chose to take a risk...," there isn't much surprising or risky about young guitarist Joe Bonamassa's fifth studio album. Most of his previous releases have mixed blues covers with his own originals, all played with a rocker's attitude, volume and less-than-subtle approach. This one follows suit and even though he goes on to say that he "wanted to make a blues album, not a rock album that has blues on it," as in the past; it's impossible to claim that he has succeeded with You & Me. That doesn't make this a bad or disappointing disc; quite the contrary, it's a solid blues-rock release and arguably his best work to date. But as early as the second track, an original rocker titled "Bridge to Better Days," Bonamassa takes off on an early Free/Savoy Brown-styled stomper. Things settle down and get more rootsy on the following two slow blues tracks, although a lovely Bonamassa original, "Asking Around for You," adds strings, not exactly a touch most would associate with pure blues. Regardless, it's extremely effective and when the strings return on a nine-and-a-half-minute cover of Led Zeppelin's "Tea for One," it is a spine-tingling experience and possibly this album's finest moment. Drummer Jason Bonham, who is excellent throughout, brings additional authenticity to the song his dad first played on. Bonamassa unplugs for a few mid-disc tracks, including a cover of "Tamp 'Em Up Solid" (oddly credited to Ry Cooder but typically known as a traditional piece, even on Cooder's version). Twelve-year-old harmonica whiz L.D. Miller does his best John Popper imitation on a hyperactive version of Sonny Boy Williamson's "Your Funeral and My Trial" (someone needs to inform the kid that playing lots of notes really fast doesn't mean he has soul), and the instrumental titled "Django" shows that Bonamassa has been listening to Gary Moore's "Parisienne Walkways." It adds up to a quality Bonamassa disc that will please existing fans and might bring some new ones into the fold, but it's also one that doesn't take the chances that he claims might push the guitarist into uncharted territory. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
CD£7.99

Blues - Released June 9, 2009 | J&R Adventures

Named after the early Jethro Tull classic, which he expertly covers here in a jaw-dropping performance, A New Day Yesterday is a fine debut by guitar ace Joe Bonamassa. And though his record company tried to ride the coattails of teenage guitar prodigies like Kenny Wayne Shepard and Jonny Lang and position him (misguidedly and much too late) as a straight-up prodigal blues kid, Bonamassa is really much more than a traditional bluesman. Rather, as best exemplified by the Jethro Tull number cited above, his bluesy take on Free's "Walk in My Shadows," or his hard boogie romp through Al Kooper's "Nuthin' I Wouldn't Do (For a Woman Like You)," this excellent debut places the guitarist's influences as much in classic '70s hard rock as in the blues. Along with his deceptively age-wearied vocals (he was only 22 at the time of this recording), this unusual combination translates into the aggressive, soulful crunch heard on Bonamassa's many original compositions. Among these, the jolting double whammy of "Miss You, Hate You" and "Colour and the Shape" (note the Anglicized spelling) are the most obvious standouts, but the guitarist also makes the Warren Haynes-penned "If Heartaches Were Nickels" his own with a tense, riveting performance. All in all, a promising debut. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
CD£9.59

Blues - Released August 1, 2020 | J&R Adventures

Despite its hardscrabble title -- a sentiment mirrored by the deeply etched black & white cover art -- 2016's Blues of Desperation is very much a continuation of the bright, varied blues-rock heard on Different Shades of Blue. On that 2014 album, Joe Bonamassa made a conscious decision to pair with a bunch of Nashville songsmiths to help sharpen his original material, and he brings most of them back for Blues of Desperation, too. The tenor of the tunes is somewhat heavy -- there are lonesome trains, low valleys, no places for the lonely -- and the production also carries a ballast, something that comes into sharp relief on the Zep-flavored title track but can be heard throughout the record. Often, he returns to this revved-up blues -- something that's more appealing when it boogies ("You Left Me Nothin' But the Bill and the Blues") than when it slams ("Distant Lonesome Train") -- and while that anchors the bulk of the record, the moments that linger are the departures. Usually, this arrives in the form of some flirtation with soul -- it's an undercurrent on "No Good Place for the Lonely" but it comes to the surface on the gilded "The Valley Runs Low" -- but the most fun is the vintage New Orleans shuffle of "Livin' Easy," a song that suggests Bonamassa may have surprises in store if he ever decides to shelve his trusty Les Pauls for the course of a full record. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD£7.99

Blues - Released September 22, 2014 | J&R Adventures

Joe Bonamassa has moved far past his initial incarnation as a kid guitar wiz with a Stevie Ray Vaughan fascination, and has developed into an elegantly reverent guitarist and a fine singer as well, bringing a little R&B blue-eyed soul to the blues. For Different Shades of Blue, Bonamassa co-wrote songs with veteran Nashville songwriters Jeffrey Steele, Gary Nicholson, James House, Jerry Flowers, and Jonathan Cain, then took 11 of the songs and tracked them in Las Vegas at Studio at the Palms with producer Kevin Shirley and a solid band of studio musicians including Reese Wynans (organ, piano), Carmine Rojas (bass), Michael Rhodes (bass), Anton Fig (drums, percussion), Lenny Castro (percussion), Lee Thornburg (trumpet, trombone), Ron Dziubla (saxophone), the Bovaland Orchestra (strings), and background vocalists Doug Henthorn and Melanie Williams. Bonamassa used 20 different vintage guitars for the project, along with 13 different amps, and lists each one in the liner notes. Consequently, this is an album about guitar tones, as each song demands its own and Bonamassa empties the tool kit. The best songs here, like the poppy and R&B-laced "Love Ain't a Love Song," the hard-driving honky tonk blues "Never Give All Your Heart," and "Trouble Town," a slice of horn-driven garage blues, are vintage Bonamassa, blending all of his influences, from Stevie Ray Vaughan, Eric Clapton, and Rory Gallagher to Jimi Hendrix and Hank Garland, into his own voice for the blues. The clear highlight here, and undoubtedly already or soon to be a high point of Bonamassa's live shows, is the stately and powerful "Oh Beautiful!," which alternates between hushed vocals and slashing, soaring electric guitar breaks, a sort of 21st century version of Blind Willie Johnson adorned with tone washes and blistering guitar. It's a striking and timeless recording, and a great blues song by anyone's standards. The problem here, though, is that with the exception of the above songs, and maybe one or two others, the songs on Different Shades of Blue shade toward the generic side of things, and no matter how wonderful and gorgeous the guitar tones may be, it's hard to make a generic song sing memorably. © Steve Leggett /TiVo

Artist

Joe Bonamassa in the magazine
  • The hat-trick
    The hat-trick One, two, three! That’s right, three albums in a single year for Joe Bonamassa!