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Jazz - Released October 1, 2014 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Sélection JAZZ NEWS
The intent behind Jamie Cullum's seventh album, Interlude -- released in the U.K. in 2014, with a U.S. release in 2015 -- is to strongly reconnect the singer/pianist with his jazz roots. Gone are the flirtations with electronics, along with original material: Cullum is playing live with a jazz orchestra, singing standards that are familiar but not shopworn. He expands the songbook so there's room for Hank Williams' "Lovesick Blues" and the Animals' "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood," but his playbook is straight out of Ray Charles. He's growling and crooning as he alternately pounds and tinkles his piano, giving plenty of space for the orchestra to surge but not allowing a lot of room for improvisation. Most of the songs here clock in somewhere between three and four minutes, which is a strong indication that this album lies toward the pop end of the jazz spectrum. This is by no means a bad thing. By devoting himself to a strong book of standards and recording with a live big band, Cullum seems reinvigorated. He's enjoying tearing into these old tunes and that excitement isn't merely palpable, it's contagious. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Booklet Distinctions Sélection JAZZ NEWS
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Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | Verve - Cullum

Booklet Distinctions Sélection JAZZ NEWS
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Pop - Released December 25, 2018 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

The fact that he knows how to sing almost everything is no big surprise to anyone. And it’s often when he covers another artists' material that Jamie Cullum shines the most. In the great tradition of the great voices of jazz history, the Brit has put together a fairly eclectic repertoire of songs ranging from Mariah Carey to Frank Ocean, Justin Bieber, Lauryn Hill and The Weeknd! “I love learning other people’s songs”, Cullum stated. “It teaches me a lot about writing, which is a big source of inspiration especially when I’m working on a new album, which is exactly what I’m doing at the minute. I strongly believe in the title of writer Austin Kleon’s book: “Voler comme un artiste”. Besides, I often find my best ideas when I’m in someone else’s shoes.” The interest of this collection of covers also comes from the rather clean and sober packaging made by Jamie Cullum himself. No shiny production or sound effects, no, just the deep, elastic voice of a master of groove and swing who is just as in touch with tradition as he is with his own time. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Decca (UMO)

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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2006 | Candid Productions

With a few hard-to-find releases under his belt, Pointless Nostalgic marks the more widespread debut of piano-pounding British crooner Jamie Cullum. Barely in his twenties, Cullum has a wise old rasp that usually takes decades of chain-smoking to acquire. Cullum's move to mix jazz standards, American songbook classics, and contemporary popular music was a risky one that could easily isolate fans of each genre. However, Cullum managed to find a unifying thread in all of the styles, tying them together in a manner that seemed like the natural culmination of a diverse record collection. Jazz plays heaviest in the mix, but Cullum's version of it is lively and roguish. A rock & roll spirit among erstwhile snobs, he brings blue jeans to the beret set. The only real downfall of the album is that the music is often outmatched by Cullum's pipes to the point of distraction. The blaring horns are too often off-key and grating, detracting from an otherwise well-performed album. Highlights come courtesy of Cullum's diverse and well-chosen array of cover songs. While so many Harry Connick, Jr. wannabes stick to the standards and limply mimic moves lifted from Frank Sinatra's catalog, Cullum hops from Radiohead to Thelonious Monk with equal verve and accomplishment. Closing number "I Want to Be a Popstar" is a playful rumination on the advantages of being a pop star rather than a jazz key pounder. The mischievous romp exemplifies the lighthearted approach that has become Cullum's calling card, endearing him to jazzophiles and screaming young girls alike. Cullum's popularity subsequently skyrocketed with 2004's Twentysomething, which exhibited a fuller grasp of his vocal strength and featured a strong backing band to match. On that album, his increasingly scratchy croon wrings every sultry note out of Jeff Buckley's "Lover, You Should Have Come Over," and he puts a sly dance club spin on "I Could Have Danced All Night." Even with the expert selection of covers, however, it's his own cheeky nod to the restlessness of youth, "Twentysomething," that steals the show. ~ Karen E. Graves
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2005 | Decca (UMO)

British pianist/vocalist Jamie Cullum's previous effort, Twentysomething, was an uncomplicated mix of piano-driven melodic pop with a jazzy twist and some reworked jazz standards. 2005's Catching Tales follows a similar format but falls short of its predecessor's simple approach by muddying up the production with dated electronic flourishes. Which isn't to say it's a bad album. On the contrary, despite some ill-advised attempts at would-be-hip DJ-style tracks, Catching Tales features more of Cullum's superb songwriting. Essentially a singer/songwriter in the tradition of such icons as Billy Joel and Randy Newman, Cullum is at his best when performing simple melodic songs with some jazz harmony that make the most of his burnished croon and verbal wit. To these ends, the beautifully melancholy "London Skies" brings to mind Joe Jackson covering a Radiohead song. Similarly, the romantic and folky "Photograph" reveals the often sardonically snotty Cullum to be a top-notch balladeer. It's also at these soft rock moments, when he isn't attempting to gun down the jazz canon, that Cullum's improvisation sounds the best. Also impressive is his mid-tempo swing-cum-soul track "Nothing I Do," which marries Harry Connick, Jr.'s neo-croon to Stevie Wonder's R&B harmonies. If Cullum's only attempt at contemporary hipness was his inspired cover version of the Doves' "Catch the Sun," the album would be a rousing success. Unfortunately though, Cullum's expansive vision finds him collaborating with Dan the Automator on the leadoff track, "Get Your Way." What may have been an attempt to try something new ultimately sounds more like early-'90s hip-hop jazz à la Digable Planets replete with scratchy vinyl record sound and canned beat. Also disappointing is his reworking of the Harry Warren classic "I Only Have Eyes for You," which, while an attempt at a Massive Attack-style trip-hop track, sounds more like U2's equally atrocious 1990 Cole Porter redo "Night and Day." However, when Cullum sticks to his piano and a good melody Catching Tales actually bests Twentysomething and easily shakes the "new-jazz" tag he has been working against. ~ Matt Collar
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Decca (UMO)

Already a sensation in his native England, 22-year-old piano man Jamie Cullum comes off like a hip amalgamation of Harry Connick, Jr. and Randy Newman on his sophomore effort, Twentysomething. As with Blue Note's crossover wunderkind Norah Jones, Cullum works best when he's not trying too hard to please hardcore jazz aficionados, but it's not too difficult to imagine his bonus-track version of Pharrell Williams' "Frontin'" turning some jazz fans onto the Neptunes. Showcasing Cullum's sardonic wit and lounge-savvy attitude, the album deftly flows from singer/songwriter love songs to jazzy barroom romps and reappropriated modern rock tunes. Cullum has a warm voice with a slight rasp that retains a bit of his Brit accent even though his influences -- Nat King Cole, Frank Sinatra, Tom Waits -- are resolutely American. Truthfully, Cullum isn't the most accomplished vocalist and his piano chops are pleasant at best -- Oscar Peterson he ain't. That said, he's still a kick. What he lacks in technique he makes up for in swagger and smarts as many of his original compositions reveal. On the swinging and wickedly humorous title track -- a take on postgraduate slackerdom -- Cullum sardonically laments, "After years of expensive education, a car full of books and anticipation, I'm an expert on Shakespeare and that's a hell of a lot but the world don't need scholars as much as I thought." It's a timely statement in our overeducated, underemployed "dot-bomb" economy and deftly posits Cullum as a jazz singer as much of as for his generation. Also compelling are his choices of cover tunes, as he is able to imprint his own persona on the songs while magnifying what made them brilliant to begin with. To these ends, Jeff Buckley's "Lover, You Should've Come Over" gets a gut-wrenchingly minimalist treatment and Radiohead's "High and Dry" comes off as the best Bruce Hornsby song you've never heard. Conversely, Cullum treats jazz standards as modern pop tunes, reworking them into contemporary styles that are neither cynical nor awkward. In fact, his atmospheric, '70s AM pop take on "Singin' in the Rain," replete with string backgrounds and Cullum's percolating Rhodes keyboard, is one of the most appealing cuts on the album, lending the Great American Songbook warhorse an air of virginity. ~ Matt Collar
£1.49

Pop - Released October 31, 2018 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

£11.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | Decca (UMO)

Already a sensation in his native England, 22-year-old piano man Jamie Cullum comes off like a hip amalgamation of Harry Connick, Jr. and Randy Newman on his sophomore effort, Twentysomething. As with Blue Note's crossover wunderkind Norah Jones, Cullum works best when he's not trying too hard to please hardcore jazz aficionados, but it's not too difficult to imagine his bonus-track version of Pharrell Williams' "Frontin'" turning some jazz fans onto the Neptunes. Showcasing Cullum's sardonic wit and lounge-savvy attitude, the album deftly flows from singer/songwriter love songs to jazzy barroom romps and reappropriated modern rock tunes. Cullum has a warm voice with a slight rasp that retains a bit of his Brit accent even though his influences -- Nat King Cole, Frank Sinatra, Tom Waits -- are resolutely American. Truthfully, Cullum isn't the most accomplished vocalist and his piano chops are pleasant at best -- Oscar Peterson he ain't. That said, he's still a kick. What he lacks in technique he makes up for in swagger and smarts as many of his original compositions reveal. On the swinging and wickedly humorous title track -- a take on postgraduate slackerdom -- Cullum sardonically laments, "After years of expensive education, a car full of books and anticipation, I'm an expert on Shakespeare and that's a hell of a lot but the world don't need scholars as much as I thought." It's a timely statement in our overeducated, underemployed "dot-bomb" economy and deftly posits Cullum as a jazz singer as much of as for his generation. Also compelling are his choices of cover tunes, as he is able to imprint his own persona on the songs while magnifying what made them brilliant to begin with. To these ends, Jeff Buckley's "Lover, You Should've Come Over" gets a gut-wrenchingly minimalist treatment and Radiohead's "High and Dry" comes off as the best Bruce Hornsby song you've never heard. Conversely, Cullum treats jazz standards as modern pop tunes, reworking them into contemporary styles that are neither cynical nor awkward. In fact, his atmospheric, '70s AM pop take on "Singin' in the Rain," replete with string backgrounds and Cullum's percolating Rhodes keyboard, is one of the most appealing cuts on the album, lending the Great American Songbook warhorse an air of virginity. ~ Matt Collar
£7.89

Vocal Jazz - Released April 26, 2010 | Candid Productions Ltd.

Candid’s 2010 release Devil May Care! cannibalizes seven tracks from Jamie Cullum’s 2002 sophomore set, Pointless Nostalgic, and since this album is only ten cuts, that’s a fair portion of the record. The other three tracks are unreleased material from the Pointless Nostalgic sessions: a spare strings-and-voice arrangement by Geoff Gascoyne of Brian Wilson’s “God Only Knows,” a nice version of “Love Won’t Let Me Wait” that fits right in with the rest of the sessions, and “Small Day Tomorrow,” which features the legendary Bob Dorough on lead vocals. “God Only Knows” is the biggest departure from the voice/piano/bass/drums instrumentation of the album but it fits well into the warm, intimate vibe of the sessions, which offer a friendly, well-manicured spin on Harry Connick, Jr.’s Sinatra throwback. While it’s unclear why there’s a whole new title instead of an expanded reissue of Pointless Nostalgic, this is nevertheless an enjoyable snapshot of Cullum at his jazziest. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2005 | Decca (UMO)

£0.99

Pop - Released February 17, 2017 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

£12.49

Jazz - Released September 1, 2014 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

£1.49

Pop - Released October 21, 2016 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

£1.49

Film Soundtracks - Released September 7, 2018 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

£12.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | Decca (UMO)

£0.99

Ambient/New Age - Released November 11, 2016 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

£3.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Decca (UMO)

£1.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Decca (UMO)

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Jamie Cullum in the magazine
  • Classy Copy Cat
    Classy Copy Cat The fact that he knows how to sing almost everything is no big surprise to anyone.