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Jazz - Released January 16, 2015 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Sélection JAZZ NEWS - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released June 9, 2017 | Motema

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
The cast list is impressive: Jack DeJohnette on drums, John Scofield on guitar, Larry Grenadier on the bass and John Medeski on keyboards. A team of four crack musicians reunited to celebrate the Hudson which gives its name to their one-off quartet. The Hudson valley is home to a certain idea of music, and it's linked to some of the last century's great names of pop music: Big Pink, the house shared by Rick Danko, Richard Manuel and Garth Hudson of the Band and where Bob Dylan would make an appearance, Woodstock, Jimi Hendrix, Joni Mitchell, etc. The album brings together original compositions and covers of, logically enough, Dylan, Hendrix, Joni Mitchell and Robbie Robertson. The virtuosity of these four is such that the cohesion of the group makes a great impression from start to finish. We are lulled by a pleasantly relaxed atmosphere, which sometimes almost turns to melancholy but which is always flavoured by improvisations that always hit the spot. And Hudson also offers the 45879th piece of evidence that Jack DeJohnette, great master of space, rhythm and silence, is one of his generation's greatest drummers. Full stop. © MD/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released May 6, 2016 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1980 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
The 2013 ECM box set Special Edition brings together all of drummer Jack DeJohnette's albums recorded with his various Special Edition ensembles. Included are 1979's Special Edition, 1980's Tin Can Alley, 1982's Inflation Blues, and 1984's Album Album. These were all adventurous, stylistically varied releases that found DeJohnette delving into an array of both straight-ahead and avant-garde jazz styles with a focus on layered, harmonically challenging post-bop. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1980 | ECM

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The first (and mightiest) of Jack DeJohnette's Special Edition ensembles offered a sound that in many ways was revolutionary in modern contemporary and creative improvised music circa 1980. With firebrand alto saxophonist Arthur Blythe and enfant terrible tenor saxophonist and bass clarinetist David Murray bobbing, weaving, and counterpunching, DeJohnette and bassist Peter Warren could have easily stood back in deference to these heavyweight pugilists. The result was a vehicle by which DeJohnette could power the two with his two-fisted drumming and play piano or melodica when the mood suited him, while Warren could simply establish a foundation for all to launch their witty, extroverted, oftentimes boisterous ideas into the stratosphere. The recording starts off very strong with two definitive tracks. "One for Eric," perfectly rendered in the spirit of Eric Dolphy, has Blythe and Murray's bass clarinet taking off, flying, and then soaring. Their contrasting tart and sweet sounds merge beautifully, and not without a smidgen of humor. "Zoot Suite" sports a great 4/4 bass groove with quirky accents, while Blythe's alto and Murray's tenor repeat a head-nodding line, then Murray's sax chortles like a cow, then they float over DeJohnette's melodica, and on the repeat line the drummer powers the band to the finish line. Both of these tracks are as complete, fully realized, and utterly unique as any in modern jazz, and deserve standards status. But John Coltrane's visage is not far behind on the peaceful "Central Park West," with DeJohnette again on the underlying melodica, while "India" has DeJohnette leading out on a playful Native and Eastern Indian motif via his piano playing. Blythe and Murray literally weep on the alto and bass clarinet. The finale, "Journey to the Twin Planet," is a free-based improvisation, with Blythe's squawky alto and Murray's long-toned tenor with overblown harmonics held in mezzo piano range, and DeJohnette's melodica evincing an electronic stance. A craggy, wild, and free bop idea provides a bridge (or maybe wormhole) to a calmer, supposed other planet. While there are no extra tracks on this recording -- and they would be welcome -- this first version of Special Edition stands alone as one of the most important and greatest assemblages of jazz musicians. This LP deserves a definitive five-star rating for the lofty place it commands in the evolution of jazz toward new heights and horizons. © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1974 | Craft Recordings

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Jazz - Released May 1, 1977 | ECM

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Drummer Jack DeJohnette's "Directions" was a rather unusual quartet. With the leader doubling on piano and matching his creativity with guitarist John Abercrombie, Alex Foster (on tenor and soprano) and bassist Mike Richmond, this was obviously a talented all-star group. The compositions on New Rags (all by DeJohnette or Foster) are difficult, rather dry and unpredictable, and the ensemble is not shy to utilize electronics and the subtle influence of rock. It is easy to see why this unit did not catch on, but its music is still fresh. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 17, 2012 | eOne Music

In his sixth decade as a professional musician, Jack DeJohnette has established himself as a musical chameleon. He's led bands and recorded and performed with an array of jazz legends as well as funk and pop artists. DeJohnette has even made new age music listenable with Peace Time and Music in the Key of Om (the former won him a Grammy). And he has always cultivated and acted on his deep, abiding interest in indigenous musics from Latin America and Africa. Sound Travels is his first recording of new material since 2009's Music We Are. True to form, DeJohnette, who plays drums and piano here, ranges widely. The disc begins with the brief "Enter Here," a grounded yet ambitious offering with the sound of a resonating bell that gives way to DeJohnette's lilting solo piano. "Salsa for Luisto" features the percussionist Luisto Quintero playing grooved-out, modern Afro-Cuban son. Esperanza Spalding is the upright bassist in the band, and on this track, she sings alongside Ambrose Akinmusire's trumpet and Lionel Loueke's guitar. DeJohnette plays piano and drums. This salsa is of the earthier yet breezier Caribbean variety. It's lovely. Just as quickly, things shift into down-home New Orleans-style funky blues with Tim Ries on soprano and tenor saxophones. Bruce Hornsby appears on vocals singing about not surrendering in the face of disaster more soulfully than on any of his own records. Loueke's unique guitar style makes this track sound more like the Band than Allen Toussaint, though Wardell Quezergue's ghost inhabits the horn chart. "New Music" is modern, modal post-bop with Middle Eastern overtones. It features fine traded solos by Ries on soprano and Akinmusire. Township jazz crossed with Latin groove is the bedrock for "Sonny Light," with Loueke's lyric solo being the tune's centerpiece as DeJohnette finds a perfect space to comp behind him and enhance the guitar's presence. The two horns and Quintero's hand drums weave a wonderful, rhythmic lyricism around the pair. The title track is an exercise in rhythm from DeJohnette, Loueke, Quintero, and Spalding (who really drives this track and shines brightly on the album as a whole). "Oneness" is a sparse and moving ballad played by DeJohnette and Quintero, backing vocalist Bobby McFerrin. The song feels deeply indebted to Milton Nascimento's excellent mid-'70s work. The set's longest cut is "Indigo Dreamscapes," a breezy, midtempo, fingerpopping Latin number. DeJohnette's piano work alongside Ries' tenor create an irresistible harmonic progression even when they move the tune toward straight-ahead jazz, then walk it back. The closer, "Home," is another languid, crystalline solo piano piece that is the bookend to "Enter Here." It's quiet, reverent, warm, and inviting, and it pays an indirect homage to Abdullah Ibrahim's South African style. Sound Travels is a current, understated, well-disciplined glimpse into DeJohnette's current musical world view, which is worth celebrating for its own sake. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1996 | ECM

Oneness finds Jack DeJohnette in a subtle reflective mood, working with a minimal backing group highlighted by pianist Michael Cain. DeJohnette and Cain turn in a series of dialogues that finds the piano highlighting the statments and improvisations of the percussion. Things are at their noisiest on "Welcome Blessing," a duet with percussionist Don Alias, but Oneness stands as a welcome, minimalist and challenging effort from DeJohnette. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 26, 2004 | ECM

This single-disc collection of eight tracks selected by drummer and composer Jack DeJohnette form his ECM recordings as a leader and sideman must have been difficult to select, at the very least. DeJohnette's own recordings have covered so much ground, and featured so many of jazz's most illustrious players, that choosing even a representative sample is almost impossible. Yet a single disc is what you have. DeJohnette made his selections like a poet, ranging far and wide over his catalog, beginning with "Third World Anthem" from his 1984 Special Edition LP, and then jumping clear to 1997, with the beautiful "Jack In," before shooting back again with "Feebles, Fables and Ferns," to his participation on guitarist Mick Goodrick's In Pas(s)ing album. Thankfully, the glorious "How's Never," from the Gateway debut is here, as are two selections from Pictures. DeJohnette explains very eloquently his reasons for his picks in the liner notes, making this a one-of-a-kind package. Rarum, album for album, is really a fine series of recordings. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released February 1, 1977 | ECM

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1996 | ECM

Oneness finds Jack DeJohnette in a subtle reflective mood, working with a minimal backing group highlighted by pianist Michael Cain. DeJohnette and Cain turn in a series of dialogues that finds the piano highlighting the statments and improvisations of the percussion. Things are at their noisiest on "Welcome Blessing," a duet with percussionist Don Alias, but Oneness stands as a welcome, minimalist and challenging effort from DeJohnette. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 6, 2016 | ECM

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Jazz - Released April 1, 1996 | ECM

Booklet
For Jack DeJohnette's 1995 ECM release, the drummer teams up in an unusual trio with pianist Michael Cain (who has his own sound) and the atmospheric reeds of Steve Gorn (who is heard on soprano, clarinet and bansuri flute). The five group originals (two of which are over 20 minutes long) build gradually to a high level of intensity. Although there is no bass, the music swings in its own way and DeJohnnette's drums and percussion are consistently stimulating. This thoughtful but often-fiery music is worth a close listen. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1974 | Craft Recordings

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Jazz - Released April 1, 1985 | ECM

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1991 | Fantasy Records

Drummer Jack DeJohnette's debut as a leader (which has been reissued on CD) has quite a bit of variety. The music ranges from advanced swinging to brief free improvisations and some avant-funk. DeJohnette (who doubles on melodica) is joined by Bennie Maupin (on tenor and flute), keyboardist Stanley Cowell, bassists Miroslav Vitous and Eddie Gomez, and drummer Roy Haynes. He uses six different combinations of musicians on the eight songs (five of his originals, John Coltrane's "Miles' Mode," Cowell's "Equipoise" and Vitous' "Mirror Image"). Intriguing and generally successful music. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 15, 2017 | Motema

Jazz - Released January 1, 2018 | Juz Jazz

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Jazz - Released May 24, 2017 | Motema

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Jack DeJohnette in the magazine