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Rock - Released June 2, 2017 | Virgin Catalog (V81)

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released June 2, 2017 | Virgin Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
HI-RES£10.99
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Rock - Released June 2, 2017 | Virgin Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
In 1976, the Stooges had been gone for two years, and Iggy Pop had developed a notorious reputation as one of rock & roll's most spectacular waste cases. After a self-imposed stay in a mental hospital, a significantly more functional Iggy was desperate to prove he could hold down a career in music, and he was given another chance by his longtime ally, David Bowie. Bowie co-wrote a batch of new songs with Iggy, put together a band, and produced The Idiot, which took Iggy in a new direction decidedly different from the guitar-fueled proto-punk of the Stooges. Musically, The Idiot is of a piece with the impressionistic music of Bowie's "Berlin Period" (such as Heroes and Low), with it's fragmented guitar figures, ominous basslines, and discordant, high-relief keyboard parts. Iggy's new music was cerebral and inward-looking, where his early work had been a glorious call to the id, and Iggy was in more subdued form than with the Stooges, with his voice sinking into a world-weary baritone that was a decided contrast to the harsh, defiant cry heard on "Search and Destroy." Iggy was exploring new territory as a lyricist, and his songs on The Idiot are self-referential and poetic in a way that his work had rarely been in the past; for the most part the results are impressive, especially "Dum Dum Boys," a paean to the glory days of his former band, and "Nightclubbing," a call to the joys of decadence. The Idiot introduced the world to a very different Iggy Pop, and if the results surprised anyone expecting a replay of the assault of Raw Power, it also made it clear that Iggy was older, wiser, and still had plenty to say; it's a flawed but powerful and emotionally absorbing work. ~ Mark Deming
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Rock - Released September 6, 2019 | Caroline International (License External)

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Has James Osterberg, a.k.a. Iggy Pop, really found his freedom? More than anything, has he not been restricted by his rock’n’roll wardrobe, his reputation as the Godfather of Punk and his status as a living legend? At the age of 72 Iggy starts his 18th studio album with one simple statement: “I wanna be free.” In 2016 his album Post Pop Depression, produced by Josh Homme from Queens Of The Stone Age, revealed Iggy Pop’s dark and mysterious side, in contrast to his usual image as a tai chi-addicted rockstar… With this short record (only 33 minutes long), Iggy is even more introverted, contemplative and most of all intimate. It’s an atypical record which was produced in close collaboration with the guitarist Sarah Lipstate and the jazz trumpeter Leron Thomas, who has created a hushed, moody atmosphere for him. “This is an album in which other artists speak for me, but I lend my voice. By the end of the tours following Post Pop Depression, I felt sure that I had rid myself of the problem of chronic insecurity that had dogged my life and career for too long. But I also felt drained. And I felt like I wanted to put on shades, turn my back, and walk away. I wanted to be free. I know that’s an illusion, and that freedom is only something you feel, but I have lived my life thus far in the belief that that feeling is all that is worth pursuing; all that you need – not happiness or love necessarily, but the feeling of being free. So this album just kind of happened to me, and I let it happen.” Between art rock, steamy jazz and spoken word (he recites Lou Reed’s poem ‘We Are the People’ and Dylan Thomas’ ‘Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night’), Iggy lets his melancholic crooner’s voice explore all kinds of sentiments. In fact, Free sometimes sounds a lot like The Idiot, his synth-drenched masterpiece from 1977 produced with David Bowie in Berlin... Forty years later, Iggy Pop has chosen to liberate himself by confounding his friends and enemies alike, signing one of his most obscure and personal records to date. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz

Rock - Released January 1, 2006 | Virgin Records

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Rock - Released June 28, 2019 | Caroline International

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Rock - Released March 18, 2016 | Caroline International

Iggy Pop has revealed that his new album, Post Pop Depression (released at Loma Vista Records), may be his last. A collaboration with Josh Homme from Queens of the Stone Age and the Arctic’ Monkeys own Matt Helders, Iggy Pop has previously stated ‘I feel like I’m closing up after this. It’s my gut instinct’. The 68 year old icon’s music has encompassed everything from jazz, to blues, to hard rock. We are sad to report that, in spite of our efforts, we have been unable to retrieve a hi-res format from the label, but rest assured, this new album deserves the best sound quality possible and we’ll keep pushing to make it happen!

Rock - Released January 1, 2006 | Virgin Records

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Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Virgin

Being iconic doesn't always go hand in hand with a strong discography. While many fans consider all three proper (Iggy and the) Stooges records essential listening, Iggy Pop, the original proto-punk, has a far spottier solo catalog. This would make a well-curated highlights collection all the more necessary, but Essential falls short by focusing mostly on Lust for Life and The Idiot-era Iggy. The remainder is a random spattering of later-period work with little regard to theme or flow. The collection is made slightly more coherent with the inclusion of minor alt-radio hits "Candy" and "Home" from 1990's Brick by Brick, but the track list doesn't reflect a chronology or even a sense of sustained mood. While this jagged presentation isn't completely void of Iggy's essence, the failure to include anything from fan-favorite albums like New Values or Zombie Birdhouse is puzzling. ~ Fred Thomas
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Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | e-label (name to be changed)

The timing of Iggy Pop's album Preliminaires is probably a product of coincidence and fate rather than careful planning, but it's hard to ignore the fact that just a few months after the unexpected death of Ron Asheton put the Stooges into limbo (at least for a while), Iggy has released an album that almost entirely avoids the issue of rock & roll. In a publicity piece for Preliminaires, Iggy wrote "I just got sick of listening to idiot thugs with guitars," and the man whose music helped inspire so many of those thugs keeps a wary distance from electric guitars on most on this album. Advance reports suggested that Preliminaires would be a jazz album, but that's not accurate, even though one of the best songs on the set, "King of the Dogs," features Iggy borrowing a melody from Louis Armstrong while backed by a traditional New Orleans jazz band. Instead, most of the music on Preliminaires recalls European pop -- music influenced by music influenced by jazz -- and the lion's share of the arrangements resemble some fusion of Serge Gainsbourg and late-period Leonard Cohen, fitted with a distinctly American accent on songs like "Spanish Coast," "I Want to Go to the Beach," and a cover of "How Insensitive." For those put off by such things, "Nice to Be Dead" is dominated by distorted electric guitars and "She's a Business" (like the nearly identical "Je Sais Que Tu Sais") booms with martial drumming, (both recall Iggy's moody solo debut The Idiot), while "He's Dead/ She's Alive" is backed by Pop's powerful acoustic blues guitar. Like 1999's Avenue B, Preliminaires is an introspective set, with Iggy crooning in a low murmur as he contemplates the failings of the world around him; he cites Michel Houellebecq's novel The Possibility of an Island as an influence (Houellebecq's words provided the lyrics for one stand-out track, "A Machine for Loving"), and the album is bookended by tunes which Iggy sings in French. Where Avenue B was a pretentious mess, Preliminaires is flawed but significantly more successful; though "Party Time" is mildly embarrassing in its depiction of decadence among the idle rich, the other songs are intelligent and often compelling meditations on a world where love and compassion are in short supply, and if "King of the Dogs" isn't exactly a new sentiment coming from Iggy, it's cock-of-the-walk air fits him like a glove (as does the trad jazz arrangement). Iggy's a better shouter than a crooner, but time has burnished his instrument with the character to fit these lyrics, and the best moments on this disc are truly inspired. Iggy Pop would be ill advised to give up on rock & roll, but Preliminaires shows he can do other things and do them well, and it speaks of a welcome maturity missing from many of his efforts outside the realm of fast and loud. ~ Mark Deming
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Pop - Released January 1, 1986 | A&M

In 1983, Iggy Pop's career was in shambles, but an unexpected windfall arrived thanks to Iggy's frequent benefactor David Bowie. Bowie recorded "China Girl," a song Bowie and Pop co-wrote, for his album Let's Dance, earning Iggy some large (and much-needed) royalty checks. Wisely realizing he was running out of second chances, Iggy decided to make the most of his good fortune; he steered clear of drugs, learned to cook his own meals, started putting money in the bank, and used his savings to bankroll a new album. David Bowie offered to help, and together they came up with Blah Blah Blah, the most calculatedly commercial album of Iggy's career. Like The Idiot, Blah Blah Blah was heavily influenced by Bowie's input; however, while The Idiot was made by a man creating intelligent and ambitious art rock, Blah Blah Blah is the work of a popmeister looking for hits and not afraid to sound cheesy about it. In the liner notes, a member of Duran Duran is thanked for the loan of a drum machine, and that speaks volumes about the production; Blah Blah Blah is slick in a very '80s way, dominated by preprogrammed percussion and swirling keyboards. And in the four years since Zombie Birdhouse, Iggy hadn't come up with much in the way of material; the only truly memorable tracks are "Real Wild Child (Wild One)," a neat bit of electro-processed rockabilly (previously a hit for Australian rocker Johnny O'Keefe), and the moody "Cry for Love," co-written by former Sex Pistols guitarist Steve Jones. Both of these songs were minor hits, so Blah Blah Blah succeeded on its obviously commercial terms, but that doesn't change the fact it's one of Iggy's least interesting albums, and has dated worse than almost anything he's ever recorded. ~ Mark Deming
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Rock - Released January 1, 1996 | Virgin Records

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Rock - Released October 28, 2016 | IGHO

Rock - Released | Virgin Records

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Rock - Released | Virgin Records

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Rock - Released September 6, 2019 | Caroline International (License External)

If you'd been a baker for more than 50 years, you could be forgiven for being sick of the sight of chocolate éclairs. Similarly, a half-century on from the first Stooges album, Iggy Pop has made it clear he's not as in love with rock & roll as he once was. Albums such as 2009's Preliminaires and 2012's Après have found him exploring less aggressive and more thoughtful material, and Iggy continues this trend with 2019's Free. In his liner notes, Iggy writes, "I began to recoil from guitar riffs in favor of guitarscapes, from twangs in favor of horns, from back beat in favor of space," and that's a concise and accurate summary of the sound he approaches on this album. While there are electric guitars on most of these numbers, there's little in the way of fuzz or bark, and a ghostly trumpet and waves of atmospheric keyboards play a much bigger role in the arrangements. Iggy had a hand in writing three of the tracks on Free, but most of the songs were penned by his primarily collaborators on this album, trumpeter Leron Thomas and Noveller, who is credited with "guitarscapes." There are a few playful moments, most notably on the sly and slinky "James Bond," but for the most part, Free finds Iggy contemplating a culture caught in a tailspin, and while no one would have expected the guy singing on Fun House to set Dylan Thomas' "Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night" to music back in the day, here his deep, craggy voice and tone of weary rage fits the classic verse like a glove. Not everything on this album works, and the sex and porn rant "Dirty Sanchez" may be the stupidest thing Iggy has sung since 2001's misbegotten Beat Em Up, though at least take comfort in the fact he didn't write it. As a detour from rock & roll, Free is a fine and compelling study of the mind and mood of Iggy Pop at the age of 72, and if it's clearly the work of an older artist, that works to its favor, a pointed contrast to the abandon of his youth but with no less gravitas. ~ Mark Deming
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Rock - Released August 26, 1991 | Buddha Records

From the time the Stooges first broke onto the music scene in 1967, Iggy Pop was rock's most remarkable one-man freak show, but by the mid-'70s, after the Stooges' messy collapse, Iggy found himself in need of a stable career. The rise of punk rock finally created a context in which Iggy's crash-and-burn theatrics seemed like inspired performance rather than some sort of cry for help, and in 1979, with everyone who was anyone name-checking Iggy as punk's Founding Father, he scored a deal with Arista Records, and New Values became his first recording since the new rock gained a foothold. These days, New Values sounds like Iggy Pop's new wave album; while former Stooges associates James Williamson and Scott Thurston worked on the album, the arrangements were dotted with synthesizer patches and electronic percussion accents that have not stood the test of time well at all, and the mix speaks of a more polite approach than the raw, raging rock of Iggy's best work. But the growth as a songwriter that David Bowie encouraged in Iggy on The Idiot and Lust for Life is very much in evidence here; "Tell Me a Story," "Billy Is a Runaway," and "How Do Ya Fix a Broken Part" are tough, unblinking meditations on Iggy's war with the persona he created for himself, and "I'm Bored" and "Five Foot One" proved rock's first great minimalist still had some worthy metaphors up his sleeve. If New Values wasn't a great Iggy Pop album, it was a very good one, and proved that he had a future without David Bowie's guidance, something that didn't seem so certain at the time. ~ Mark Deming

Rock - Released | Virgin Catalog (V81)

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Rock - Released January 1, 1999 | Virgin Records

Where did this come from? 1993's electrocharged American Caesar proved the Ig was no spent force. But 1996's Naughty Little Doggie and other post-Soldier LPs the last 19 years yielded merely OK rock 'n' roll, short of his original outrageous inspiration. Time for a radical departure? Apparently so. Three decades into such an illustrious, infamous, distinguished career, Mr. Ostenberg takes his biggest leave from the Iggy Stooge outrageous rocker persona, even bigger than his Berlin Bowie days. At 52, the ex-STOOGES singer wants to play battlescarred sage, with an unexpected, stripped-down style that's equal parts Leonard Cohen, Scott Walker, '90s Lou Reed, and Tom Waits. Avenue B is thus his first becalmed, nakedly introspective LP. There's little hint of hard rock, outside of a boisterous take on JOHNNY KIDD & THE PIRATES oft-covered 1959 classic "Shakin' All Over," and a wonderfully cranky, nearly-psychedelic shocker called "Corruption." Otherwise, troubadour Iggy intones scared spoken word over chilling, soundtracky synths, and lightly croons songs of discontented, post-divorce sequestration betwixt acoustics and bongos. Hmmm! Big fans might lament the loss of raw power, but to hear what's eatin' the Ig after 30 years of carefree mayhem is rather illuminating. Avenue B is the aural alarm of a man who's advancing in age, and hates it without a regular mate. Though it works best with him just speaking apprehensively-the shell-shocked narrator in a world going to hell as always-Avenue B is holds together through a variety of quiet mood backgrounds and the Ig's directness. Clearly, it is the words he wants you to hear this time, this stirring of a soul who has finally faced the fact of his own mortality, if wonderfully so much later than the rest of us more regular mortals. His first album, in 1969, opened "Last year I was 21/Didn't have a lot of fun." His 16th LP, in 1999, begins "It was in the winter of my fiftieth year when it hit me/I was really alone and there wasn't a lot of time left." Prepare for an alienating nerve-wracker. ~ Jack Rabid

Rock - Released | Caroline International (License External)

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Iggy Pop in the magazine