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Contemporary Jazz - Released May 26, 2017 | Label Bleu

Hi-Res Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
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Free Jazz & Avant-Garde - Released March 4, 2013 | Label Bleu

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Contemporary Jazz - Released February 28, 2020 | Label Bleu

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Taking frequent trips to Henri Texier’s inspirational planet is sensible and an absolute necessity. Texier is one of France’s most respected bass players and this hot new album is here to remind us that his music is like a marketplace, full of life and people. The album features the musician’s long-term friends and collaborators (Sébastien Texier, Vincent Lê Quang, Manu Codjia, and Gautier Garrigue). It also touches on many of the themes and values that he cherishes, as shown in the songs’ symbolic titles (Cinecitta, Simone et Robert - for Simone Veil and Robert Badinter, and Pina B - for Pina Bausch). The album is entitled Chance (Luck) and for Texier it is about being lucky: “Lucky for being here today, for having played with so many marvelous musicians, for having shared so much with inspired artists who trusted me and taught me their arts. Lucky for having had enough energy to feel the freedom, excitement, weightlessness, and fullness of jazz music. Lucky for always keeping a warm and dedicated audience around me. Lucky for having been able to conduct my artistic projects freely, in particular those recorded, filmed, photographed, and illustrated by Philippe Teissier du Cros, Guy Le Querrec, and Christophe Rémy. Lucky for having been able to work with Sébastien Texier, Vincent Lê Quang, Manu Codjia (insanely good on Cinecitta!), and Gautier Garrigue. They are all brilliant and inspired musicians—thanks to whom I can still explore the new territories of this rich and emotional music. Lucky, finally, for having, after all these years, only very few regrets.” Is everything said? Not totally. The listener will also be lucky. Lucky to spend 54 minutes immersed in this plural and collective jazz trip. Henri Texier is a musician even more than a bass player and he thinks of his music as such, with a true sense of narrative. Exquisite. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released November 15, 2019 | JMS Productions

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Contemporary Jazz - Released January 1, 2000 | Label Bleu

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Contemporary Jazz - Released February 2, 2018 | Label Bleu

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More active than ever, Henri Texier plays around with revisiting the past. With Sand Woman, the double bass player mostly sifts through his recordings from the 70s, his JMS Records era. With a quintet as inspired as ever, composed of guitarist Manu Codjia (impressive in his improvisations), drummer Gauthier Garrigue, saxophonists Vincent Lê Quang and his son Sébastien, he revisits his old themes like Amir and Les là-bas. Also on the menu of this celebration of exploration and bifurcation, there are more recent compositions. But the result is still very consistent, as Texier remains a leader who always ensures that his accomplices express themselves. At last, Sand Woman will also remind you that the man is a great composer (Hungry Man) as well as a great sound producer (the ten-minute long Indians). © MZ/Qobuz
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Contemporary Jazz - Released January 1, 1993 | Label Bleu

In the early '90s, Henri Texier went on to form a new quartet (Azur) around a new rhythm section featuring pianist Bojan Zulfikarpasic and drummer Tony Rabeson. At the time, the combo was rounded out by the very much underrated Glenn Ferris on trombone. An Indian's Week documents the first steps of this quartet and, on a couple of tracks, also showcases two pillars of French jazz -- Michel Portal on bandoneon and Louis Sclavis on clarinets and soprano saxophone. The album can easily be remembered as the birth of one of France's best and tightest rhythm sections. It is also a great opportunity to hear at full length Glenn Ferris, a versatile and sensitive musician, exploring all the different aspects of his instrument. The program is composed of compositions penned by all bandmembers, plus a colorful and breakneck rendition of Sonny Rollins' "The Bridge." Despite this variety, this is an extremely cohesive set because of the original sound the quartet have already developed. The highlight is Texier's own "Indians/Desaparecido," a slow and dark piece in which Ferris' wah-wah style works surprisingly well when pitted against Sclavis' glistening clarinet. The overall mood oscillates between playful and mournful moments, with pieces that reflect Texier's political and social concerns. An Indian's Week marks a turn in Henri Texier's career and is a first step in the right direction. © Alain Drouot /TiVo
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Contemporary Jazz - Released February 5, 2016 | Label Bleu

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Jazz - Released November 15, 2019 | JMS Productions

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Contemporary Jazz - Released October 20, 2008 | Label Bleu

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Contemporary Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Label Bleu

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Contemporary Jazz - Released January 1, 1988 | Label Bleu

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Contemporary Jazz - Released January 1, 1995 | Label Bleu

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Jazz - Released November 15, 2019 | JMS Productions

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2004 | Label Bleu

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Contemporary Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Label Bleu

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Jazz - Released March 11, 2016 | Intuition

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Electronic - Released May 13, 2016 | Ninja Tune

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Contemporary Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Label Bleu

Recorded in France in 1988 and released in the U.S. in 1995, Colonel Skopje is a good example of what could be described as "post-bop with fusion references." This CD isn't full-fledged fusion; it isn't as consistently rock-influenced and funk-minded as -- just to give two 1980s examples -- Miles Davis' Tutu or Scott Henderson's Dr. Hee. But at the same time, French bassist Henri Texier isn't one of those dogmatic purists who insists on staying away from all things electric. While Texier sticks to the upright bass, the quintet that he leads on this album includes Steve Swallow on electric bass and John Abercrombie on electric guitar; rounding out the lineup are saxophone explorer Joe Lovano (who is also heard on flute) and Italian drummer Aldo Romano. Abercrombie is highly regarded in fusion circles, and he certainly hasn't escaped the influence of rock and funk. With this interesting mix of electric and acoustic instruments, the part European, part American quintet avoids standards and emphasizes new material. Some of it is quite cerebral, especially two abstract pieces that Lovano contributed, "P.M." and "In the Land of Ephesus." But a more lyrical approach prevails on Romano's airy "Night Diary," which wouldn't be out of place on a Pat Metheny or Leni Stern disc. Meanwhile, Texier's mysterious title song is slightly Asian influenced and isn't unlike something that pianist/keyboardist Joe Zawinul would have written for the fusion powerhouse Weather Report in the 1970s or 1980s. Colonel Skopje falls short of superb, but it's a decent effort that is worth hearing if you like your post-bop with a touch of fusion. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Contemporary Jazz - Released March 30, 2018 | Label Bleu

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