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Rock - Released February 5, 2013 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions Album du mois Magic - The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
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Rock - Released February 4, 1977 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions Album du mois Magic - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released February 4, 1977 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rumours is the kind of album that transcends its origins and reputation, entering the realm of legend -- it's an album that simply exists outside of criticism and outside of its time, even if it thoroughly captures its era. Prior to this LP, Fleetwood Mac were moderately successful, but here they turned into a full-fledged phenomenon, with Rumours becoming the biggest-selling pop album to date. While its chart success was historic, much of the legend surrounding the record is born from the group's internal turmoil. Unlike most bands, Fleetwood Mac in the mid-'70s were professionally and romantically intertwined, with no less than two couples in the band, but as their professional career took off, the personal side unraveled. Bassist John McVie and his keyboardist/singer wife Christine McVie filed for divorce as guitarist/vocalist Lindsey Buckingham and vocalist Stevie Nicks split, with Stevie running to drummer Mick Fleetwood, unbeknown to the rest of the band. These personal tensions fueled nearly every song on Rumours, which makes listening to the album a nearly voyeuristic experience. You're eavesdropping on the bandmates singing painful truths about each other, spreading nasty lies and rumors and wallowing in their grief, all in the presence of the person who caused the heartache. Everybody loves gawking at a good public breakup, but if that was all that it took to sell a record, Richard and Linda Thompson's Shoot Out the Lights would be multi-platinum. No, what made Rumours an unparalleled blockbuster is the quality of the music. Once again masterminded by producer/songwriter/guitarist Buckingham, Rumours is an exceptionally musical piece of work -- he toughens Christine McVie and softens Nicks, adding weird turns to accessibly melodic works, which gives the universal themes of the songs haunting resonance. It also cloaks the raw emotion of the lyrics in deceptively palatable arrangements that made a tune as wrecked and tortured as "Go Your Own Way" an anthemic hit. But that's what makes Rumours such an enduring achievement -- it turns private pain into something universal. Some of these songs may be too familiar, whether through their repeated exposure on FM radio or their use in presidential campaigns, but in the context of the album, each tune, each phrase regains its raw, immediate emotional power -- which is why Rumours touched a nerve upon its 1977 release, and has since transcended its era to be one of the greatest, most compelling pop albums of all time. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released September 23, 2016 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Completing the trilogy begun by Rumours (1977) and Tusk (1979), Fleetwood Mac recorded Mirage between 1981 and 1982 at the famous Château d'Hérouville. The acoustics of the venue have been compared to Abbey Road studios and the likes of Bowie, Iggy Pop, Cat Stevens and a bunch of others have all passed through. After a hiatus where they followed their own personal ambitions, the quintet returned to the studio. In the meantime, Stevie Nicks, Mick Fleetwood and Lindsey Buckingham had set off on their solo careers. And Nicks' Bella Donna, released a year earlier, produced by Tom Petty and Jimmy Iovine, was at the top of the charts, selling 8 million copies. Enough to overshadow this Mirage... However, there was no way she was leaving Fleetwood Mac. The beautiful girl whose voice had been roughened by dope signed off on two songs: Gypsy, a nostalgic ballad which she dedicated to her friend Robyn Snider Anderson, and Straight Back. Christine McVie composed Hold Me, Love in Store, one of the hits on the opus, as well as Wish You Were Here and Only Over You. In fact, it was Buckingham, in the same vein as Tusk, who wrote most of the songs.Less experimental than Tusk but less obvious than Rumours in its melodic writing, Mirage closes Fleetwood Mac's golden period. Dominating the work, McVie's kitschy synthesizers print an antiquated eighties sound onto the intros of Can't Go Back and Oh Diane, giving the work a flaky pop varnish. It was not until Tango In The Night, five years later, that the FM sound was back. Within this Deluxe version, we find a live performance at the Los Angeles Forum in 1982 where we hear Buckingham's bluesy guitars, unpublished versions, B-sides and a cover of Fats Domino's Blue Monday. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Rock - Released October 12, 1979 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released April 30, 2013 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released September 23, 2016 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions Best New Reissue
Completing the trilogy begun by Rumours (1977) and Tusk (1979), Fleetwood Mac recorded Mirage between 1981 and 1982 at the famous Château d'Hérouville. The acoustics of the venue have been compared to Abbey Road studios and the likes of Bowie, Iggy Pop, Cat Stevens and a bunch of others have all passed through. After a hiatus where they followed their own personal ambitions, the quintet returned to the studio. In the meantime, Stevie Nicks, Mick Fleetwood and Lindsey Buckingham had set off on their solo careers. And Nicks' Bella Donna, released a year earlier, produced by Tom Petty and Jimmy Iovine, was at the top of the charts, selling 8 million copies. Enough to overshadow this Mirage... However, there was no way she was leaving Fleetwood Mac. The beautiful girl whose voice had been roughened by dope signed off on two songs: Gypsy, a nostalgic ballad which she dedicated to her friend Robyn Snider Anderson, and Straight Back. Christine McVie composed Hold Me, Love in Store, one of the hits on the opus, as well as Wish You Were Here and Only Over You. In fact, it was Buckingham, in the same vein as Tusk, who wrote most of the songs.Less experimental than Tusk but less obvious than Rumours in its melodic writing, Mirage closes Fleetwood Mac's golden period. Dominating the work, McVie's kitschy synthesizers print an antiquated eighties sound onto the intros of Can't Go Back and Oh Diane, giving the work a flaky pop varnish. It was not until Tango In The Night, five years later, that the FM sound was back. Within this Deluxe version, we find a live performance at the Los Angeles Forum in 1982 where we hear Buckingham's bluesy guitars, unpublished versions, B-sides and a cover of Fats Domino's Blue Monday. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Rock - Released November 15, 2019 | Sony Music CG

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Before The Beginning? Before taking over the sound waves with its most popular combination (with the presence of Lindsey Buckingham, Stevie Nicks and Christine McVie) Fleetwood Mac already existed in 1968. Risen from the ashes of the Bluesbreakers, this version of the band, created by the brilliant Peter Green (with two other guitarists, Jeremy Spencer and a very young Danny Kirwan, Mick Fleetwood on drums and John McVie on the bass), took inspiration from the Delta blues by covering some of its legendary icons: Robert Johnson, Elmore James, T-Bone Walker… In three discs, Sony has uncovered thirty live rarely heard versions from 1968 to 1970 -- including four demos. These tracks are phenomenal, unlabelled and therefore entirely appraised and approved by their creators, who present a vision of contrasts over the course of the record. It begins in 1968 with lively but consistent guitars, before a more wandering feeling to the music in 1970, with Green’s signature extended instrumental sections, like the vibrant 13-minute-long Rattlesnake Shake, the fierce Oh Well or the languid tones of the famous Albatross, all in more rough-around-the-edges versions. Sadly, Spencer would go on to join the Children of God, Kirwan would be thrown out due to his alcohol dependency and Peter Green’s genius slowly evolved into madness. This is a real piece of British musical history. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 19, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released December 4, 2015 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released March 31, 2017 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released October 12, 2002 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released March 31, 2017 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released November 16, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Records

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This Peter Green-led edition of the Mac isn't just an important transition between their initial blues-based incarnation and the mega-pop band they became, it's also their most vital, exciting version. The addition of Danny Kirwan as second guitarist and songwriter foreshadows not only the soft-rock terrain of "Bare Trees" and "Kiln House" with Christine Perfect-McVie, but also predicts Rumours. That only pertains to roughly half of the also excellent material here, though; the rest is quintessential Green. The immortal "Oh Well," with its hard-edged, thickly layered guitars and chamber-like sections, is perhaps the band's most enduring progressive composition. "Rattlesnake Shake" is another familiar number, a down-and-dirty, even-paced funk, with clean, wall-of-sound guitars. Choogling drums and Green's fiery improvisations power "Searching for Madge," perhaps Mac's most inspired work save "Green Manalishi," and leads into an unlikely symphonic interlude and the similar, lighter boogie "Fighting for Madge." A hot Afro-Cuban rhythm with beautiful guitars from Kirwan and Green on "Coming Your Way" not only defines the Mac's sound, but the rock aesthetic of the day. Of the songs with Kirwan's stamp on them, "Closing My Eyes" is a mysterious waltz love song; haunting guitars approach surf music on the instrumental "My Dream"; while "Although the Sun Is Shining" is the ultimate pre-Rumours number someone should revisit. Blues roots still crop up on the spatial, loose, Hendrix-tinged "Underway," the folky "Like Crying," and the final outcry of the ever-poignant "Show Biz Blues," with Green moaning "do you really give a damn for me?" Then Play On is a reminder of how pervasive and powerful Green's influence was on Mac's originality and individual stance beyond his involvement. Still highly recommended and a must-buy after all these years, it remains their magnum opus. ~ Michael G. Nastos
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Rock - Released July 11, 1975 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Released November 21, 1988 | Warner Records

Rock - Released November 16, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Fifty years already! In 1968, Fleetwood Mac began a story that reads like a novel. Throughout their dramas with drugs, unrest and romances, we also find their greatest successes. 50 Years - Don't Stop compiles together - for the first time - half a century of the Californian group's colourful existence, divided into three parts. It starts with their very bluesy beginnings, carried by Peter Green, Jeremy Spencer and the late Danny Kirwan, who at the time lost himself to LSD.  This first album features the very essence of Fleetwood Mac and its roots steeped in the British blues of the sixties. Then the second album covers their rise towards world fame by bringing together Fleetwood Mac (1975), Rumours (1977) and Tusk (1979), marking a shift towards pop that was shaped by the arrival of the Stevie Nicks-Lindsey Buckingham couple as well as Christine McVie on keyboards. The third part spans from the ‘80s up to their return to the recording studio in 2013, when the band was still whole. Today, as they prepare for their 2019 European tour, Fleetwood Mac no longer includes the man who long held the reins: Lindsey Buckingham. The guitarist immediately took them to court. Mick Campbell, the guitarist from Tom Petty's Heartbreakers, and Neil Finn from Crowded House will be in his place. It looks like Fleetwood Mac may only ever be able to create when there’s turmoil. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Rock - Released March 31, 2017 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Rock - Released December 4, 2015 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released April 22, 2004 | Columbia

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Fleetwood Mac in the magazine