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Rock - Released February 5, 2013 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions Album du mois Magic - The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
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Rock - Released February 4, 1977 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions Album du mois Magic - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Rumours is the kind of album that transcends its origins and reputation, entering the realm of legend -- it's an album that simply exists outside of criticism and outside of its time, even if it thoroughly captures its era. Prior to this LP, Fleetwood Mac were moderately successful, but here they turned into a full-fledged phenomenon, with Rumours becoming the biggest-selling pop album to date. While its chart success was historic, much of the legend surrounding the record is born from the group's internal turmoil. Unlike most bands, Fleetwood Mac in the mid-'70s were professionally and romantically intertwined, with no less than two couples in the band, but as their professional career took off, the personal side unraveled. Bassist John McVie and his keyboardist/singer wife Christine McVie filed for divorce as guitarist/vocalist Lindsey Buckingham and vocalist Stevie Nicks split, with Stevie running to drummer Mick Fleetwood, unbeknown to the rest of the band. These personal tensions fueled nearly every song on Rumours, which makes listening to the album a nearly voyeuristic experience. You're eavesdropping on the bandmates singing painful truths about each other, spreading nasty lies and rumors and wallowing in their grief, all in the presence of the person who caused the heartache. Everybody loves gawking at a good public breakup, but if that was all that it took to sell a record, Richard and Linda Thompson's Shoot Out the Lights would be multi-platinum. No, what made Rumours an unparalleled blockbuster is the quality of the music. Once again masterminded by producer/songwriter/guitarist Buckingham, Rumours is an exceptionally musical piece of work -- he toughens Christine McVie and softens Nicks, adding weird turns to accessibly melodic works, which gives the universal themes of the songs haunting resonance. It also cloaks the raw emotion of the lyrics in deceptively palatable arrangements that made a tune as wrecked and tortured as "Go Your Own Way" an anthemic hit. But that's what makes Rumours such an enduring achievement -- it turns private pain into something universal. Some of these songs may be too familiar, whether through their repeated exposure on FM radio or their use in presidential campaigns, but in the context of the album, each tune, each phrase regains its raw, immediate emotional power -- which is why Rumours touched a nerve upon its 1977 release, and has since transcended its era to be one of the greatest, most compelling pop albums of all time. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released February 4, 1977 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released October 12, 1979 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released September 23, 2016 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Hi-Res Distinctions Best New Reissue
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Rock - Released April 30, 2013 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Rock - Released September 23, 2016 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions Best New Reissue
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Rock - Released January 19, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Rock - Released November 16, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Fifty years already! In 1968, Fleetwood Mac began a story that reads like a novel. Throughout their dramas with drugs, unrest and romances, we also find their greatest successes. 50 Years - Don't Stop compiles together - for the first time - half a century of the Californian group's colourful existence, divided into three parts. It starts with their very bluesy beginnings, carried by Peter Green, Jeremy Spencer and the late Danny Kirwan, who at the time lost himself to LSD.  This first album features the very essence of Fleetwood Mac and its roots steeped in the British blues of the sixties. Then the second album covers their rise towards world fame by bringing together Fleetwood Mac (1975), Rumours (1977) and Tusk (1979), marking a shift towards pop that was shaped by the arrival of the Stevie Nicks-Lindsey Buckingham couple as well as Christine McVie on keyboards. The third part spans from the ‘80s up to their return to the recording studio in 2013, when the band was still whole. Today, as they prepare for their 2019 European tour, Fleetwood Mac no longer includes the man who long held the reins: Lindsey Buckingham. The guitarist immediately took them to court. Mick Campbell, the guitarist from Tom Petty's Heartbreakers, and Neil Finn from Crowded House will be in his place. It looks like Fleetwood Mac may only ever be able to create when there’s turmoil. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Rock - Released October 12, 2002 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Rock - Released March 31, 2017 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Pop - Released November 21, 1988 | Warner Bros.

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Rock - Released March 31, 2017 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Rock - Released November 16, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Rock - Released December 4, 2015 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Rock - Released March 31, 2017 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Rock - Released September 12, 2011 | Columbia

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Rock - Released July 11, 1975 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Rock - Released January 19, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Their second eponymous album, Fleetwood Mac, of 1975, allowed the group to redefine an evolving identity. Everything had changed since the debut work, which had come out seven years earlier. The British group had lost three guitarists. Addled by LSD, disgusted by money, Peter Green, a pure blues spirit, deserted. Jeremy Spencer joined the Children of God, and the very young Danny Kirwan was sacked for alcohol troubles and poor mental health. All that remained were Fleetwood and McVie. In California Mick Fleetwood came across the couple Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks, while John McVie recruited his future wife to the keyboards. English blues born from the ashes of the Bluesbreakers, Fleetwood Mac, hitched to the Nicks-Buckingham team, passed over into rock bearing the Californian "FM" stamp. Mainstream radios never received such good vibrations. Before Rumours which would inundate a whole generation, the group was already nurturing that quality which would propel them up the charts. Nicks's raw sensuality on Rhiannon, Buckingham's nascent leadership on I’m So Afraid, the dulcet pop of Over My Head and Say You Love Me. But also singular beauties such as Landslide, more known for its cover by the Smashing Pumpkins or Crystal. Between a hippie dusk raging against the rising tide of punk and remnants of the blues (World Turning), Fleetwood Mac, whose earlier versions and live recordings are offered up for discovery in this Deluxe edition, set out on a lightning ascent under a narcotic spell as winning as it was tragic. © CS/Qobuz
£30.99

Rock - Released February 5, 2013 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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