Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD£46.99

Symphonic Music - Released September 25, 2009 | Sony Classical

CD£43.99

Classical - Released April 28, 2017 | Sony Classical

CD£27.99

Classical - Released October 14, 2016 | Sony Classical

CD£15.49

Classical - Released January 18, 2013 | Sony Classical

This complete set of Witold Lutoslawski's symphonies is a mixture of old and new. The second, third, and fourth symphonies are reissues of recordings made in the 1980s and 1990s during Esa-Pekka Salonen's tenure with the Los Angeles Philharmonic; all were acclaimed readings, and the 1985 version of the sizzlingly orchestrated Symphony No. 3, by now Lutoslawski's most commonly programmed and recorded work, has held up well against newer recordings. What's new is the Symphony No. 1, recorded in the new Walt Disney Hall to round out the set in commemoration of the composer's 100th birthday. (The entire recording of the symphony is new, although the bizarre numbering of the tracks makes this difficult to figure out.) This work is not often played. Lutoslawski wrote it in occupied Warsaw and managed to physically carry the score out of the city during the 1944 Warsaw Uprising and hide with it in an attic for eight months. Later he expressed a negative attitude toward the piece, but it's well worth hearing. It might be described as overgrown neo-classicism, with short sonata-form movements and strong traces of Prokofiev and Albert Roussel, but with harmonic density, Lutoslawski's complex orchestration, and his characteristic bristly counterpoint breaking out everywhere. Salonen still ranks as Lutoslawski's foremost champion, and these four symphonies, evenly distributed over 50 years of the composer's career, form an arresting portrait of the figure in whose work modernism and the traditional symphonic medium seem most closely reconciled. If there's a complaint here, it's that the remastering, although quite good, cannot compensate for the sonic differences between Walt Disney Hall and the earlier recordings in a studio and in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. The set makes you want to hear all four symphonies conducted by Salonen in the new hall, which seems tailor-made for Lutoslawski. © TiVo
CD£12.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Esa-Pekka Salonen is known primarily as a conductor, particularly for his work with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, but he considers himself essentially a composer with a day job as a conductor. His high profile as a performer certainly opens the possibilities for top-notch performances of his works, and he makes ample use of those opportunities, writing for some outstanding international ensembles and soloists. The Los Angeles Philharmonic and pianist Yefim Bronfman are featured here in the composer's Helix, a work for orchestra, and his Piano Concerto and Dichotomie for piano solo. Each of the pieces demonstrates Salonen's ability to incorporate the rigorous disciplines inculcated by his training with modernists such as Franco Donatoni and Niccolò Castiglioni into a friendlier musical language more characteristic of his teacher Einojuhani Rautavaara and his colleagues Magnus Lindberg and John Adams. While his music would never be mistaken for theirs, the composers whose music his most resembles in the pieces recorded here are John Adams, for its harmonic language and expressive sweep, and Louis Andriessen, for its restless, sometimes mechanistic propulsiveness. Helix, a 10-minute tone poem, bristles with energy and drive, as does "Méchanisme," the first movement of the piano solo Dichotomie. The Piano Concerto, which Salonen wrote for his friend Bronfman, is an especially attractive and varied work, structurally inventive and surprising, full of brilliantly original orchestrations. Bronfman pulls off the virtuosic piano part with panache, and Salonen's vibrant conducting creates enormous momentum. Deutsche Grammophon's sound is clean and sparkling. © TiVo
CD£12.99

Classical - Released November 30, 2012 | Sony Classical

No one would guess from his baby face that Esa-Pekka Salonen is a hard-edged, tough-guy modernist who got his start conducting works by Magnus Lindberg, the enfant terrible of Finnish music. But it is true and his recording career is proof. Nowhere in his discography is there a note of Beethoven or Brahms. Even in so conservative a company as Sony, Salonen has become the resident modernist with discs dedicated to Bartók, Debussy, and Mahler (that's Sony's modernism). He has even amassed an amazing series of Stravinsky recordings since his Sony debut in 1988. Salonen started with Stravinsky's first masterpiece, The Firebird. Rather than use Stravinsky's modest revision of the score, Salonen went back to the original 1910 version with its gargantuan orchestra of quadruple woodwinds, huge brass section plus a seven-piece brass band on-stage, an enormous percussion section that included bells, xylophone, celesta, and piano, plus three harps and 64 strings. Not that all this late-Romantic armament blunts the blade of Salonen's modernism. It only gives him more ammunition to aim at the work's Russian fairy tale heart. Stravinsky later commented on The Firebird that "belongs to the style of its time." This is true as far as it goes. The use of diatonic folk-like melodies for humans and chromaticism for the supernatural does come out of Rimsky-Korsakov's late operas. But those are merely the work's point of origin. Under the right hands -- and Salonen's are the right hands -- numbers like "Fairy Carillon" and especially "Infernal Dance" become threats to musical complacency. Even such pretty little sound toys as the "Round Dances" and the "Lullaby" aren't exercises in late-Russian emotionality; in their own quiet way, they subvert the conventions of Romanticism through Stravinsky's nascent aesthetic of ironic stylization to distance the creator and, thus, the audience, from the creation. © TiVo
CD£12.99

Classical - Released May 4, 2018 | Sony Classical

CD£12.99

Classical - Released February 22, 1991 | Sony Classical

CD£12.99

Classical - Released August 10, 2000 | Sony Classical

CD£12.99

Classical - Released June 5, 2009 | Sony Classical

CD£12.99

Classical - Released December 14, 2018 | Sony Classical

CD£8.49

Classical - Released May 4, 2018 | Sony Classical

CD£12.99

Classical - Released May 4, 2018 | Sony Classical

CD£12.99

Classical - Released May 4, 2018 | Sony Classical

CD£8.49

Classical - Released May 4, 2018 | Sony Classical

CD£12.99

Classical - Released May 4, 2018 | Sony Classical

CD£12.99

Classical - Released April 13, 1992 | Sony Classical

CD£8.49

Classical - Released May 4, 2018 | Sony Classical