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Blues - Released April 27, 2004 | Reprise

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R&B - Released May 22, 2020 | Reprise

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Rock - Released September 23, 2016 | Reprise

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Rock - Released August 26, 2016 | Reprise

Eric Clapton recorded The Road to Escondido, a collaborative effort with his laconic idol J.J. Cale, in 2006 but the pair didn't play supporting concerts due to Cale's aversion of touring. He wound up showing up for one show: a date near his home in San Diego, playing five songs on March 15, 2007 at the iPayOne Center. That guest set forms the heart of 2016's Live in San Diego, a double-disc live album released three years after Cale's death. Effectively, this marks Clapton's second tribute to Cale since J.J.'s passing -- in 2014, he assembled The Breeze: An Appreciation of J.J. Cale -- but this brief mid-concert set perhaps illustrates the love and affection between the two men better than either The Breeze or The Road to Escondido. Mainly relying on chestnuts (although the new "Anyway the Wind Blows" kicks off the set), the chemistry is there along with a palpable affection between the two musicians, with Clapton following Cale's lazy lead. It provides a nice contrast to the heavy blues that dominates the rest of the album. Working with a band featuring guitarists Doyle Bramhall II and Derek Trucks plus drummer Steve Jordan, Clapton opens up with no less than five Derek & the Dominos numbers -- including "Got to Get Better in a Little While," not released while the band was active -- and then concludes with a bunch of blues covers (Robert Cray shows up for a closing "Crossroads"), along with his own "Wonderful Tonight" and "Layla," the only two big hits on the album. That kind of crowd-pleasing isn't part of the intention of this particular concert. Instead, Clapton decides to devote the majority of his set list to the guitar, which helps offset the easy-rolling grooves of the Cale showcase. Combined, it amounts to one of his most satisfying live albums. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released August 23, 2010 | Orange Leisure

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Blues - Released December 7, 2004 | Reprise

It appears that Eric Clapton had more Robert Johnson in his blood than he thought -- or perhaps it was planned this way. This DVD/CD set (and really, it's not the other way around despite the packaging), showcases Clapton mining the Robert Johnson vein ever more deeply in no less than four different settings. The DVD features 19 acoustic and electric performances recorded in rehearsal spaces in Dallas and in England, as well as in the 508 Park Ave. in Dallas, a studio Johnson himself recorded in, in 1937. There is one more segment, a recorded solo acoustic in a hotel room in California. The band that joins Clapton in the rehearsal studios is comprised of guitar master Doyle Bramhall, organist Billy Preston, Steve Gadd on drums, pianist Chris Stainton and Nathan East on bass. The electric performances, particularly "Milkcow's Calf 's Blues," "Stop Breakin' Down Blues," and especially "I Wish I Had Possession Over Judgment Day," have some real life and stomp in them. Of the acoustic tracks, "Terraplane Blues" works best. The DVD also contains a selection of behind-the-scenes footage that will be of interest only to those fans who need to see everything. The CD contains 11 cuts culled from the DVD and the sequencing is in some ways preferable. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released March 6, 2001 | Reprise

For a musician known to strive for authenticity, Eric Clapton has always been curiously obsessed with appearances, seemingly as interested in sartorial details and hairstyles as in the perfect guitar lick. It's hard to find two photographs of him from the 1960s and early '70s that appear to be the same person, and even after he formally launched his solo career he switched looks frequently. Thus, the album sleeve of his 13th solo studio album of new material, Reptile, its "concept" credited to the recording artist, seems significant. The album cover shows a smiling Clapton as a child, and there are family photographs on the back cover and in the booklet, along with a current photograph of the artist, who turned 56 in the weeks following the album's release, in an image that does nothing to hide the wrinkles of late middle age. This photograph faces a sleeve note by Clapton that begins with his explanation of the album title: "Where I come from, the word 'reptile' is a term of endearment, used in much the same way as 'toe rag' or 'moosh.'" (Thanks, Eric. Now, all listeners have to do is find out what "toe rag" and "moosh" mean!) The note then goes on to dedicate the album warmly to Clapton's uncle. All of this might lead you to expect an unusually personal recording from a man who has always spoken most eloquently with his guitar. If so, you'd be disappointed. Reptile seems conceived as an album to address all the disparate audiences Clapton has assembled over the years. His core audience may think of him as the premier blues guitarist of his generation, but especially as a solo artist, he has also sought a broader pop identity, and in the 1990s, with the hits "Tears in Heaven" and "Change the World," he achieved it. The fans he earned then will recognize the largely acoustic sound of such songs as "Believe in Life," "Second Nature," and "Modern Girl." But those who think of Clapton as the guy who plays "Cocaine" will be pleased with his cover of another J.J. Cale song, "Travelin' Light," and by the time the album was in record stores mainstream rock radio had already found "Superman Inside," which sounds like many of his mid-tempo rock hits of the '80s. This diversity is continued on less familiar material, especially the many interesting cover songs. Somebody, perhaps the artist himself, has been busy looking for old chestnuts, since Reptile contains a wide variety of them: the 1930 jazz song "I Want a Little Girl," recorded by McKinney's Cotton Pickers among others; John Greer's 1952 R&B hit "Got You on My Mind"; Ray Charles' 1955 R&B hit "Come Back Baby"; James Taylor's 1972 hit "Don't Let Me Be Lonely Tonight"; and Stevie Wonder's 1980 hit "I Ain't Gonna Stand for It." The two earliest of these songs are old and obscure enough that Clapton is able to make them his own, and he recasts the Taylor song enough to re-invent it, but remaking songs by Charles and Wonder means competing with them vocally, and as a singer Clapton isn't up to the challenge. He is assisted by the current five-man version of the Impressions, who do much to shore up his vocal weaknesses, but he still isn't a disciplined or thoughtful singer. Of course, when that distinctive electric guitar sound kicks in, all is forgiven. Still, Reptile looks like an album that started out to be more ambitious than it ended up being. There may be a song here for each of the artist's constituencies (and, more important to its commercial impact, for every major radio format except talk and country), but as a whole the album doesn't add up to the statement Clapton seems to have been hoping to make. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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World - Released December 12, 2019 | MP Digital

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Rock - Released April 1, 2020 | Cult Legends

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Rock - Released January 1, 1977 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1980 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1970 | Polydor Records

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Right after he finished a tour with the Delaney & Bonnie couple, Clapton ended the collaboration because of a fight with them. Nevertheless, his creativity had not left him so he decided to go through a solo adventure and made a perfect start as a leader. Eric Clapton was released in 1970 after recording sessions in Los Angeles and London. Pop oriented, this album is still influenced by gospel and r’n’b which produces a diverse musical experience. Brownie, Clapton’s first Stratocaster is the main guitar used on the record, even though the guitarist is able to take care of some other on acoustic track (Easy Now). The legend is on its way. © AR/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 1978 | Polydor Records

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With his 6th studio album (1978), Eric Clapton broke a cycle in his solo career: it was the last time that he used the musicians he started with. On Blackless, JJ Cale came back to compose I’ll Make Love To You Anytime while Bob Dylan wrote two tracks. After many well made albums, Clapton seemed to be in a little lack of inspiration. Even if the majority of the songs are paradise for guitar players, they might not seduce people that do not care much about that instrument. © AR/Qobuz
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Pop - Released January 1, 1994 | Polydor Records

Eric Clapton was contracted to Polydor Records from 1966 to 1981, first as a member of Cream, then Blind Faith, and later as a solo artist and as the leader of Derek and the Dominos. The 19-track, 79-minute Cream of Clapton disc surveys his career, presenting an excellent selection from the period, including the Cream hits "Sunshine of Your Love," "White Room," and "Crossroads"; "Presence of the Lord," Clapton's finest moment with Blind Faith; "Bell Bottom Blues" and "Layla" from Derek and the Dominos; and 11 songs from Clapton's solo work, among them the hits "I Shot the Sheriff," "Promises," and "I Can't Stand It." The selection is thus broader and better than that found on 1982's Time Pieces collection, and with excellent sound and liner notes by Clapton biographer Ray Coleman, The Cream of Clapton stands as the single-disc best-of to own for Clapton's greatest recordings. [Not to be confused with the popular 1987 Polydor (U.K.) compilation The Cream of Eric Clapton.] © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | Polydor Records

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Another Ticket is the first album that Clapton recorded for a major after he signed a contract for Warner. The album was composed as a tribute to Carl Radle (Clapton’s bass player who was fired by Slowhand and who did an overdose). For the first time, Clapton brought two keyboards and embraced the 80’s trend. With a full American sound, God opened his music to a wider public. Of course, Floating Bridge reminds that Clapton is into his universe when he plays the blues. Rita Mae was recorded while Clapton and the other guitar player were jamming. Another Ticket is a well made album that opened the path to a new beginning in Clapton’s career. © AR/Qobuz 
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Rock - Released January 1, 1975 | Polydor Records

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Right after he came out of detox due to his problems related to drugs and alcohol, the one who will become know as God published a live album. E.C. Was Here is made of recordings from the guitar player’s 1974 tour (Long Beach Arena, Hammersmith Odeon, Providence Civic Center…). After a first album recorded with Brownie, Clapton decided to come on stage with his Gibson for a fuller, more powerful sound. Focusing on a blues repertory, E.C. Was Here is fantastic: on his playground, Slowhand impresses and leads the discussions with George Terry. A cover of Ramblin’ On My Mind (Robert Johnson), an acoustic Driftin’ Blues, a long moaning on Have You Ever Loved A Woman… The content is linked together at lightning speed and when album ends, the first desire is to start it again. © AR/Qobuz

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Eric Clapton in the magazine
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