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Progressive Rock - Released October 1, 1970 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd.

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Rock - Released September 30, 2016 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Rock - Released September 30, 2016 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Rock - Released June 14, 1971 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd.

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Progressive Rock - Released November 1, 1971 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd.

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Progressive Rock - Released March 17, 1977 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Progressive Rock - Released May 26, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Rock - Released January 15, 2016 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd.

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Rock - Released September 30, 2016 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Progressive Rock - Released July 29, 2016 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd.

The Anthology is a three-disc collection chronicling the progressive rock trio’s career between 1970 and 1998. A fitting tribute to the memory of the late keyboard virtuoso Keith Emerson, the collection features 39 tracks and contains brand new liner notes, rare photographs, and exclusive material traversing the band’s activities throughout their career. © Rob Wacey /TiVo
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Progressive Rock - Released May 26, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Rock - Released July 6, 1972 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

After the heavily distorted bass and doomsday church organ of Emerson, Lake & Palmer's debut album, the exhilarating prog rock of epic proportions on Tarkus, and the violent removal of the sacred aura of classical tunes on Pictures at an Exhibition, Trilogy, ELP's fourth album, features the trio settling down in more crowd-pleasing pastures. Actually, the group was gaining in maturity what they lost in raw energy. Every track on this album has been carefully thought, arranged, and performed to perfection, a process that also included some form of sterilization. Greg Lake's acoustic ballad "From the Beginning" put the group on the charts for a second time. The adaptation of Aaron Copland's "Hoedown" also yielded a crowd-pleaser. Prog rock fans had to satisfy themselves with the three-part "The Endless Enigma" and "Trilogy," both very strong but paced compositions. By 1972, Eddie Offord's recording and producing techniques had reached a peak. He provided a lush, comfy finish to the album that made it particularly suited for living-room listening and the FM airwaves. Yet the material lacks a bit of excitement. Trilogy still belongs to ELP's classic period and should not be overlooked. For newcomers to prog rock it can even make a less-menacing point of entry. © François Couture /TiVo
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Progressive Rock - Released July 29, 2016 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

The Anthology is a three-disc collection chronicling the progressive rock trio’s career between 1970 and 1998. A fitting tribute to the memory of the late keyboard virtuoso Keith Emerson, the collection features 39 tracks and contains brand new liner notes, rare photographs, and exclusive material traversing the band’s activities throughout their career. © Rob Wacey /TiVo
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Progressive Rock - Released June 27, 1992 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

Returning to the studio after a 14-year layoff, Emerson, Lake & Palmer stripped down their sound and amped up their attack for 1992's BLACK MOON. Its closest sonic cousin is the mid-'80s album Emerson and Lake recorded with drummer Cozy Powell. Sharp digital electronics replace Keith Emerson's classic analog synthesizer sounds, and the fanciful, classical-influenced prog-rock epics of yore are streamlined into a more accessible mainstream rock format, though some traces of the trio's vintage flash still pop up. © TiVo
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Rock - Released January 15, 2016 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd.

In 1977, after three years' time off working on various solo projects -- which were to have culminated with a trio of solo albums -- Emerson, Lake & Palmer reunited to release Works, Vol. 1, a double LP containing the best of the solo works plus a side of group-conceived pieces. All in all, it was the most ambitious and wide-ranging body of music they'd ever released, and was followed by the more modestly proportioned but still successful Works, Vol. 2 in November of that year, and a tour that fall and winter; in keeping with the albums that spawned it, the concerts initially featured a 90-piece orchestra supporting the trio. They weren't able to keep the orchestra for more than a handful of shows before the money ran out, and the group spent the rest of the tour working as a trio to pay off what was owed, but they recognized the importance of those performances with the orchestra and saw to it that one of them, at least, was captured properly and professionally -- and unlike Welcome Back My Friends to the Show That Never Ends, their 1974 live album, which had its share of technical flaws, this time around the recording was state-of-the-art. Ironically, what they captured was almost an embarrassment of riches for their record label at the time -- by 1979, the brand of progressive rock represented by ELP was falling out of favor with critics and the public under the four-way assault of punk, new wave, power pop, and disco, and all Atlantic Records felt comfortable releasing at the time was a paltry single live LP, entitled In Concert. The advent of the CD era and the revival of the trio in the 1990s led to the latter's reissue and expansion into this two-CD set, released in late 1993. Recorded at the Montreal Olympic Stadium (pictured on the cover of both albums), it features the trio performing with a symphony orchestra. Technically, it's a beautiful album, avoiding most of the pitfalls and sonic shortcomings of their earlier concert ventures on record, and the repertory is the widest ranging of their entire history, reaching back to "Knife Edge" (from their first album) and reviving "Abaddon's Bolero," an instrumental from Trilogy, plus a brace of tracks of all proportions from both Works albums, among them Keith Emerson's "Piano Concerto" and his more modestly conceived "Tiger in the Spotlight" and his rendition of Scott Joplin's "Maple Leaf Rag," Greg Lake's "C'Est la Vie," "Watching Over You," "Closer to Believing," and his interpretation of "Show Me the Way to Go Home" -- all in versions distinctly superior to their studio renditions -- as well as the reconceived "Tank." Prog rock fans will be delighted by "Pictures at an Exhibition," here shorter, tighter, and obviously more symphonic than the group's 1971 recording. There is a real sense listening to this album, however -- despite some light and disarming moments such as "Tiger in the Spotlight," and good, cohesive playing throughout -- that you're really listening not so much to a band as to three personalities just chomping at the bit to go solo. Lake's featured numbers were, by now, so guitar-focused that they sounded like a separate body of music, which they were. Carl Palmer, who had fully come into his own as a creative musician by this time -- even recording a concerto of his own for percussion and orchestra that would get released 24 years later -- had also achieved a distinct voice, matching that of the other two members. Works Live is a proper and worthy successor to Welcome Back My Friends, capturing the group's last, grand musical gestures before ego conflicts tore them apart, though even in this regard there are flaws -- apparently, they never did get a usable official recording of "Pirates," a centerpiece of Works, Vol. 1, and on Emerson's concerto, represented here only by its last movement, an otherwise beautiful and bracing live performance ends with a lackluster finale. No one will complain of the sound or the scope, however, and the enjoyable and even surprising moments do outnumber the disappointments, even if most of the material is less focused than the repertory represented on their earlier concert releases. © Bruce Eder & Francois Couture /TiVo
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Progressive Rock - Released November 20, 1970 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd.

Lively, ambitious, almost entirely successful debut album, made up of keyboard-dominated instrumentals ("The Barbarian," "Three Fates") and romantic ballads ("Lucky Man") showcasing all three members' very daunting talents. This album, which reached the Top 20 in America and got to number four in England, showcased the group at its least pretentious and most musicianly -- with the exception of a few moments on "Three Fates" and perhaps "Take a Pebble," there isn't much excess, and there is a lot of impressive musicianship here. "Take a Pebble" might have passed for a Moody Blues track of the era but for the fact that none of the Moody Blues' keyboard men could solo like Keith Emerson. Even here, in a relatively balanced collection of material, the album shows the beginnings of a dark, savage, imposingly gothic edge that had scarcely been seen before in so-called "art rock," mostly courtesy of Emerson's larger-than-life organ and synthesizer attacks. Greg Lake's beautifully sung, deliberately archaic "Lucky Man" had a brush with success on FM radio, and Carl Palmer became the idol of many thousands of would-be drummers based on this one album (especially for "Three Fates" and "Tank"), but Emerson emerged as the overpowering talent here for much of the public. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Progressive Rock - Released November 1, 1971 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd.

Pictures at an Exhibition was one of the seminal documents of the progressive rock era, a record that made its way into the collections of millions of high-school kids who never heard of composer Modest Mussorgsky and knew nothing of Russia's Nationalist "Five" or artist/architect Victor Hartmann, whose work was the inspiration for Mussorgsky. Chronologically, it was Emerson, Lake & Palmer's third LP release (they didn't regard it as an "official" album, as it was comprised of only part of a longer live performance), but for a lot of teenagers who'd missed out on the trio's self-titled debut album or resisted the unfamiliarity of Tarkus, Pictures -- which was budget-priced in its original LP release in England and America -- with its bracing live ambience and blazing pyrotechnics, was the album that put the group over, and did it with exactly the same kids who turned Jethro Tull's Aqualung and Thick as a Brick and Yes' Fragile into standard-issue accouterments of teenage suburban life. And, indeed, like the Tull and Yes albums, it worked on several levels that allowed widely divergent audiences to embrace it -- with the added stimulus of certain controlled substances, it teased the brain with its mix of melody and heavy rock, and for anyone with some musical knowledge, serious or casual, it was a sufficiently bold use of Mussorgsky's original to stimulate hours of delightful listening. It wasn't the first treatment of a classical piece in this manner by any means -- Keith Emerson had done several previously with his earlier group the Nice -- but it was the first to reach a mass audience or get heavy radio play (at least of excerpts), and introduced the notion of "classical rock" to millions of listeners, including the classical community, most of whose members regarded this record as something akin to an armed assault. Those with less hidebound sensibilities appreciated Emerson's rollicking and delightful "Blues Variations" -- which bridged the gap between Tarkus and Trilogy -- and Greg Lake's lyrical adaptations of "Promenade," "The Sage," and "The Great Gates of Kiev." It does some violence to Mussorgsky in the process, but is also the most concise, energetic, and well-realized live release in ELP's catalog, the hall small enough to capture the finer nuances of the playing by all three members of the trio, and especially the muscular bass work by Lake that keeps pushing the performance forward. It was great fun (an element missing from a good deal of progressive rock) in 1972, and it's still fun in 2005. It also made a fairly compelling case for adapting classical pieces in this way -- ELP would later succeed with adaptations of works by Aaron Copland and Alberto Ginastera, among others, but this would be the longest such work to find mass listenership, sufficient so that in the late '80s there would be a legitimate classical organ arrangement put out by the Dorian label that referred to ELP's rendition as its linear predecessor. The early-'70s live sound is a little crude by today's standards, but the various CD upgrades from Rhino, Sanctuary, and Japanese WEA have given the recording a close, powerful sound that captures the tightness of the playing (drummer Carl Palmer is especially good) and makes up for any sonic inadequacies. Emerson is the dominant musical personality here, but Lake (who also gets to play some classical guitar) and Palmer get the spotlight more than enough to prevent it from being a pure keyboard showcase. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Progressive Rock - Released September 27, 1994 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

Emerson, Lake & Palmer's In the Hot Seat is an album, not unlike their 1978 album Love Beach, which was made for the wrong reasons, at a bad time, and probably shouldn't have been made at all. Speculation is that ELP was contractually obligated to record the third of a three-album deal at a time when Carl Palmer had required minor surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome and Keith Emerson had required major surgery for performance-induced damage to his right arm. Clearly, the band's head was not in the game and it shows. To call this a horrible album would be a bit unfair, many could only dream of playing like ELP on their bad days, but it does suffer from a lack of direction, heart, and perhaps most noticeably, a lack of production. Most of ELP's great albums were produced by Greg Lake but, for whatever reasons, this one was not. Producer Keith Olsen does not seem to have a feel for the ELP sound and the album lacks that big ELP sound. A track such as "Hand of Truth" might have worked with bigger production but it is halted by its own smallness. There are brief glimpses of the band's brilliance, and the track "Daddy," recorded about the disappearance of a young girl in upstate New York, will rip the heart out of any parent, but this album falls short on so many levels that not even the talents of three phenomenal musicians can save it. © Marc Loren /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 27, 2015 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd.

Emerson, Lake & Palmer's most successful and well-realized album (after their first), and their most ambitious as a group, as well as their loudest, Brain Salad Surgery was also the most steeped in electronic sounds of any of their records. The main focus, thanks to the three-part "Karn Evil 9," is sci-fi rock, approached with a volume and vengeance that stretched the art rock audience's tolerance to its outer limit, but also managed to appeal to the metal audience in ways that little of Trilogy did. Indeed, "Karn Evil 9" is the piece and the place where Keith Emerson and his keyboards finally matched in both music and flamboyance the larger-than-life guitar sound of Jimi Hendrix. This also marked the point in the group's history in which they brought in their first outside creative hand, in the guise of ex-King Crimson lyricist Pete Sinfield. He'd been shopping around his first solo album and was invited onto the trio's new Manticore label, and also asked in to this project as Lake's abilities as a lyricist didn't seem quite up to the 20-minute "Karn Evil 9" epic that Emerson had created as an instrumental. Sinfield's resulting lyrics for "Karn Evil 9: First Impression" and "Karn Evil 9: Third Impression," while not up to the standard of his best Crimson work, were better than anything the group had to work with previously -- he was also responsible for Emerson's choice of title, persuading the keyboardist that the music he'd come up with was more evocative of a carnival and fantasy than the pure science fiction concept that Emerson had started with. And Greg Lake pulled out all the stops with his heaviest singing voice in handling them, coming off a bit like Peter Gabriel in the process. And amid Carl Palmer's prodigious drumming, it was all a showcase for Emerson, who employed more keyboards and more sounds here -- including electronic voices -- than had previously been heard on one of their records. The songs (except for the light-hearted throwaway "Benny the Bouncer") are also among their best work -- the group's arrangement of Sir Charles Hubert Parry's setting of William Blake's "Jerusalem" manages to be reverent yet rocking (a combination that got it banned by the BBC for potential "blasphemy"), while Emerson's adaptation of Alberto Ginastera's music in "Tocatta" outstrips even "The Barbarian" and "Knife Edge" from the first album as a distinctive and rewarding reinterpretation of a piece of serious music. Lake's "Still...You Turn Me On," the album's obligatory acoustic number, was his last great ballad with the group, possessing a melody and arrangement sufficiently pretty to forgive the presence of the rhyming triplet "everyday a little sadder/a little madder/someone get me a ladder." And the sound quality was stunning, and the whole album represented a high point that the trio would never again achieve, or even aspire to -- after this, each member started to go his own way in terms of creativity and music. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 19, 1973 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

Emerson, Lake & Palmer's most successful and well-realized album (after their first), and their most ambitious as a group, as well as their loudest, Brain Salad Surgery was also the most steeped in electronic sounds of any of their records. The main focus, thanks to the three-part "Karn Evil 9," is sci-fi rock, approached with a volume and vengeance that stretched the art rock audience's tolerance to its outer limit, but also managed to appeal to the metal audience in ways that little of Trilogy did. Indeed, "Karn Evil 9" is the piece and the place where Keith Emerson and his keyboards finally matched in both music and flamboyance the larger-than-life guitar sound of Jimi Hendrix. This also marked the point in the group's history in which they brought in their first outside creative hand, in the guise of ex-King Crimson lyricist Pete Sinfield. He'd been shopping around his first solo album and was invited onto the trio's new Manticore label, and also asked in to this project as Lake's abilities as a lyricist didn't seem quite up to the 20-minute "Karn Evil 9" epic that Emerson had created as an instrumental. Sinfield's resulting lyrics for "Karn Evil 9: First Impression" and "Karn Evil 9: Third Impression," while not up to the standard of his best Crimson work, were better than anything the group had to work with previously -- he was also responsible for Emerson's choice of title, persuading the keyboardist that the music he'd come up with was more evocative of a carnival and fantasy than the pure science fiction concept that Emerson had started with. And Greg Lake pulled out all the stops with his heaviest singing voice in handling them, coming off a bit like Peter Gabriel in the process. And amid Carl Palmer's prodigious drumming, it was all a showcase for Emerson, who employed more keyboards and more sounds here -- including electronic voices -- than had previously been heard on one of their records. The songs (except for the light-hearted throwaway "Benny the Bouncer") are also among their best work -- the group's arrangement of Sir Charles Hubert Parry's setting of William Blake's "Jerusalem" manages to be reverent yet rocking (a combination that got it banned by the BBC for potential "blasphemy"), while Emerson's adaptation of Alberto Ginastera's music in "Tocatta" outstrips even "The Barbarian" and "Knife Edge" from the first album as a distinctive and rewarding reinterpretation of a piece of serious music. Lake's "Still...You Turn Me On," the album's obligatory acoustic number, was his last great ballad with the group, possessing a melody and arrangement sufficiently pretty to forgive the presence of the rhyming triplet "everyday a little sadder/a little madder/someone get me a ladder." And the sound quality was stunning, and the whole album represented a high point that the trio would never again achieve, or even aspire to -- after this, each member started to go his own way in terms of creativity and music. © Bruce Eder /TiVo