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Rock - Released July 29, 2016 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released July 19, 2013 | RCA Victor

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released January 2, 2015 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The original Elvis' Golden Records, Vol. 3 was, like its predecessors, an unprecedented release -- no one in rock & roll up to that point, other than Elvis, had ever legitimately earned a second greatest-hits volume, much less a third. This is also the place where the legitimately softer, more mature Presley replaces the angry young Elvis represented on the first two volumes. On a sexual level, songs like "Stuck on You," "It's Now or Never," "Fame and Fortune," "I Gotta Know," and "Surrender" offer seduction rather than diverting violation. He might no longer have been a rebel, but as represented on the original ten songs of this album, he was still making the Top Five and even the top of the charts regularly with work that was legitimately fine early-'60s rock & roll and pop/rock. "His Latest Flame" or "Good Luck Charm" might not have been groundbreaking musical statements of the caliber of "Heartbreak Hotel" or "Blue Suede Shoes," but in Elvis' hands they were worth hearing over and over. The original 12 songs have been augmented by six more, including "Can't Help Falling in Love" (which should have been on this disc to begin with) and the hauntingly beautiful "Girl of My Best Friend," which was a number two hit in England (and may be the prettiest song Elvis ever cut), plus "Wild in the Country" and "Wooden Heart" (a hit in Europe) from G.I. Blues. The producers have stuck with the most tasteful and intriguing numbers from the films, within the time frame of the original release, the annotation is thorough, and the 1997 remastered sound runs circles around all prior editions. ~ Bruce Eder
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Rock - Released January 2, 2015 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released February 8, 1999 | RCA Records Label

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Elvis Presley's legendary recordings for Sun Records had been reissued many times before Sunrise appeared in early 1999, most notably in the 1987 collection The Complete Sun Recordings. Despite its title, The Complete Sun Recordings was missing a few odds and ends, plus its sequencing on CD was a little didactic, resulting in a repetitive listen. Those flaws are corrected on the exceptional Sunrise, a generous 38-song double-disc set that contains all of Elvis' Sun recordings, including alternate takes and several previously unreleased live performances. The compilers wisely decided to devote the first disc to the original takes, dedicating the second to alternate takes: six live cuts from 1955 and four private demos from 1953 and 1954. This sequencing emphasizes the brilliance of this music. Not only is listening to all 19 masters in a row quite breathtaking, but the second disc winds up as a revelatory experience, since it offers a kind of alternate history by following Elvis' pre-professional recordings from his Sun sessions to early live performances. As such, Sunrise is essential for the curious and the collector alike. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released March 14, 2014 | RCA - Legacy

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How much did Colonel Tom Parker flood the Elvis marketplace in the early '70s? Between 1969's From Vegas to Memphis to 1974's Elvis Recorded Live on Stage in Memphis, Presley was releasing a live album nearly every year (1971 was skipped). Each one was tied to an event -- a televised concert from Hawaii, his first concert in New York -- but, decades removed from this era, it's easy to forget that at the dawn of the '70s, seeing Elvis on-stage was in itself event, as he spent the better part of the '60s making movies instead of playing live. In fact, the last time he had played in Memphis, Tennessee was in 1961, so even though it was the last in a long line of live records, the homecoming concert captured on 1974's cumbersomely titled Elvis Recorded Live on Stage in Memphis was something special: it captured a beloved hero returning home. Presley made sure he was prepared for the occasion, running through much of the set two days prior the March 18 Memphis concert at the Richmond Coliseum. The 2014 Legacy Edition of Recorded Live on Stage contains that concert as its second disc (this second disc also has five very relaxed, very spare, quite appealing rehearsals from August 1974, cut just prior to an appearance in Vegas) and it's quite a bit different in tenor than the released record; it's loose and rollicking, with Elvis and the TCB band feeding off the energy of an exuberant audience. In contrast, the Memphis concert -- here on the first disc, in the expanded, full-concert addition originally released on Follow That Dream Records in 2004 -- is precise, professional, and deadly, a testament to the Presley team being a well-oiled machine. As this full-length Legacy Expansion reveals, far from being just another Elvis live record, Recorded Live on Stage in Memphis is a little bit of dynamite, proof that on a good night in 1974, Elvis was still as good as rock & roll got. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released August 11, 2015 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Ambient/New Age - Released November 24, 2017 | RCA - Legacy

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Rock - Released October 14, 2016 | RCA - Legacy

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The Wonder of You is a sequel in the truest sense: it delivers more of the same thing that made the 2015 album If I Can Dream into a surprise hit around the globe. The gimmick behind both of the albums is taking original Elvis Presley vocal performances and setting them to brand-new orchestral arrangements from the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. The Wonder of You isn't as splashy as its predecessor, lacking duets with Michael Bublé and Il Volo (the bonus track, "Just Pretend," does feature Helene Fischer), and it also doesn't contain quite as many rockers as If I Can Dream. All this means The Wonder of You is thoroughly middlebrow, largely consisting of ballads and soft pop tunes, all given pompous pops arrangements. Occasionally, the new versions aren't too far away from the originals -- usually, this would be for such '70s Vegas showstoppers as "I Just Can't Help Believin'" -- but there's still a dramatic disconnect between Presley's vocal performances and the cheerfully cheesy orchestrations, particularly on numbers like "Kentucky Rain" and "Suspicious Minds," recordings that benefited from the interaction of Elvis and the musicians in Chips Moman's American Sound Studio. To the creators of The Wonder of You, this kind of musical interplay is a mere nicety: all that matters is the power of Presley's performance, which the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra accentuates. It, like If I Can Dream, is executed well -- the separation between the old tapes and new performance is seamless -- but the concept is misbegotten and the results are tacky, a record that celebrates Presley the persona instead of Elvis the musician. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released September 24, 2002 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released July 1, 2015 | Crazy Warthog Media

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Rock - Released November 20, 2000 | RCA Records Label

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For those familiar only with the King of Rock & Roll's name and reputation, the prospect of buying a best-of can be quite a nauseating proposition. The huge range of compilations available varies in quality, and depth, but as yet there exists no definitive choice for first-time Presleyers. RCA's latest attempt to correct this is perhaps the finest best-of Elvis Presley ever. Spanning two CDs and, as its title suggests, 50 songs, all the classic tracks are here, from "Heartbreak Hotel" through "Suspicious Minds." The sound quality is as near-perfect as one will get for a best-of from this artist, and the packaging is quite superb. While it may not be as in-depth as other compilations, The 50 Greatest Hits is adequate for those wanting the major hits, and provides a taster for each of his styles. As a starting point to Elvis Presley's work, this is unmatched by any other best-of and is an almost perfect compilation in that all of his most noted tracks are here, as are all the finest moment from each of his eras. For the more hardcore Elvis fan, also, The 50 Greatest Hits is an essential purchase, offering almost all of the finest tracks on a mere two discs. ~ Ben Davies
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Rock - Released November 6, 2015 | RCA - Legacy

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Rock - Released April 6, 2018 | RCA - Legacy

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Rock - Released July 19, 2013 | RCA Victor

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Elvis' 1957 original Christmas album is one of his most inspired early outings and the first time he tackled anything resembling a thematic concept. Split evenly between rockers and bluesy numbers like "Santa Claus Is Back in Town," "Blue Christmas," and "Santa Bring My Baby Back to Me," perennials like "White Christmas," "I'll Be Home for Christmas," and "Silent Night," and straight-ahead gospel favorites like "I Believe," "Peace in the Valley" and "Take My Hand, Precious Lord," the disc revealed a different side of the rocker for the first time on a public instead conditioned to expect something outrageous. One of the King's shining moments, this is quite simply still one of the best holiday albums available. ~ Cub Koda
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Rock - Released July 28, 2017 | RCA - Legacy

A Boy from Tupelo rounds up all the known existing Elvis Presley recordings from 1953 through 1955, a sum total of 53 studio takes and 32 live performances. The subtitle of the triple-disc set is The Complete 1953-1955 Recordings but it could as easily been dubbed The Sun Years, as the first two discs not only contain all the masters Elvis released for Sam Phillips' legendary Memphis label, but all the outtakes, the four alternate mixes of Sun material released by RCA, and the four acetates Presley privately cut for Phillips' Memphis Recording Service. The third disc is devoted to live material, primarily recorded at the Shreveport radio show Louisiana Hayride, but there are also some tracks recorded at concerts and radio stations in Texas and Mississippi. A lot of this third disc has shown up on prior Presley compilations, usually collections targeted at the hardcore Elvis fans, but A Boy from Tupelo presents all this music in a logical, orderly sequence that suits Legacy's previous big Presley boxes, such as 2011's Young Man with the Big Beat: The Complete 1956 Masters. If A Boy from Tupelo doesn't seem as revelatory as that five-disc box, blame it on the fact that apart from the live recordings -- which are cleaned up, but often can still seem pretty rough -- this is heavily recycled material. Elvis' Sun sessions were first reissued as a 16-track LP called The Sun Sessions in 1976, which was trumped 11 years later by the CD release of The Complete Sun Sessions -- which itself wound up getting usurped in 1999 by the double-disc Sunrise. Additionally, this music can be found on 1992's five-CD The King of Rock 'n' Roll: The Complete 50s Masters, the massive 2010 box The Complete Elvis Presley Masters, and 2016's The RCA Album Collection, albeit spread over some of that set's 60 CDs, so no matter how well executed A Boy from Tupelo is -- and it's very well done, boasting a handsome, detailed book and clean sound -- it can't help but feel a little old hat. Still, those consumers in the market for the earliest Elvis will be satisfied by this, as it not only has everything in one convenient box but the addition of the live material does provide a nice coda to the familiar Sun sessions. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released May 5, 1994 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released May 23, 2014 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released December 6, 2012 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released July 19, 2013 | RCA Victor

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OK, to be fair, For LP Fans Only is no more a real Elvis Presley album than, say, Yesterday and Today was a real Beatles album -- Elvis was nine months through his two-year hitch in the army and RCA needed to get something "new" in the way of an LP out on him, so they threw together a quartet of sides from his Sun Records singles that had never been on album, five of his early RCA sides (which don't sound too different from the Sun stuff stylistically) that had similarly missed being put onto long-player, and one odd song off of the Love Me Tender soundtrack EP, and voila -- a new Elvis LP. It doesn't sound like much from that description, but in its time For LP Fans Only was (along with its follow-up, A Date With Elvis) one of the choicest of all Elvis Presley albums. From 1959 until 1976, unless you wanted to try hunting down the original singles, this was the only way that any listeners got to hear the King's Sun Records singles "That's All Right," "Mystery Train," and "My Baby Left Me," and the only album to offer such early RCA sides as "Shake, Rattle & Roll" as well. Maybe it could all have been done better and more coherently, and it would've been nice if the producers had avoided the electronically rechanneled stereo through which the original mono sides were processed, but all RCA was trying to do was get some Elvis Presley material out there -- they didn't get interested in the history or the particulars of the music until about 20 years later, and considering their obliviousness, they did astonishingly well. At least the songs were out there -- a lot of listeners wore out copies of this album just lending them around to the uninitiated -- and taken on its own terms, there weren't five more exciting rock & roll albums than this that you could buy in 1959 (or a lot of years after). It still holds up as one of the best rock & roll albums ever released, and for anyone who wants to remember (or find out) how most listeners discovered Elvis' early stuff during the 1960s and 1970s, this is one place to start, though vinyl connoisseurs will want to get a mono copy, and CD purchasers should get hold of the 2001-release audiophile Japanese version, mastered in 24-bit digital audio. ~ Bruce Eder

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Elvis Presley in the magazine
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