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Classical - Released October 18, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Don't be fooled: this youthful face belongs to an 18 year old violinist with a wealth of knowledge and a tried-and-tested technique. For proof, just look at his Bach record, which came out before this Tchaikovsky Concerto, also on Deutsche Grammophon. With every new outing, Daniel Lozakovich surrounds himself with famous formations: for Bach, the Bavarian Radio Chamber Orchestra; for Tchaikovsky, the Russian National Philharmonic under Vladimir Spivakov (himself a great violinist who conducted his first recital in 2010). This gutsy concerto is addressed by a musician with an ample, sparkling sound, capable of an intense virtuosity and a very tender melancholy. Alongside Spivakov, who also recorded this score, he is quite at home. The hands-on sound recording seeks out the fullness of lyricism here, without robbing the strings of their bite. Note that the young soloist learned his scales under Eduard Wulfson in Karlsruhe. This student of giants like Henryk Szeryng, Nathan Milstein and Yehudi Menuhin (no less) taught his young disciple the violin of the Russian school. This young artist's voracious curiosity did the rest. And so, the second part of his programme here offers passages where pure melancholy has been distilled into music, as in Lensky's aria from Eugene Onegin, an opera that the violinist adores and knows by heart. His performance is inspired by previous interpretations by Fritz Wunderlich and Ivan Kozlovsky. And no-one could deny it: Daniel Lozakovich's violin sings! © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Violin Concertos - Released June 8, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
The press is already in a spin about it: "The new Menuhin"; "a star is born"; "the enchanted bow"... Daniel Lozakovich, 17 years old, might have his head in the stars, but he has his feet firmling on the ground. He is shaping a dazzling career with stunning maturity. Born in Sweden to a family from the former USSR, he learned violin in 2007, at the age of 6. Two years later, he would play his first concerto, conducted by Vladimir Spivakov. There then followed the difficult quest to find a teacher who would "not change my musicality, but make me stronger." Daniel Lozakovich currently lives in Geneva, where he works with Eduard Wulfson, a private tutor that he met at the Verbier Festival. It was also at this festival, which showcases young talents, that the teenager met Valery Gergiev, who immediately took him under his protective and liberating wing. Signed to Deutsche Grammophon (DG), Daniel Lozakovich would soon record Beethoven's Concerto in D Major with his mentor, "a work whose structure is so clear", he said, "but whose music is so difficult". Daniel Lozakovich listened to a lot of records to perfect his playing and his musical knowledge. He learned a lot from listening to the great masters of the past, in particular Bruno Walter, who charmed him with his sense of detail, and the sound he gets from his orchestra, as well as his poetic phrasing. This preference says a lot about this very young musician, who we discover here on his first record, dedicated to Bach. Listening to the Second Partita (with its brilliantly-structured Chaconne) and the Concertos in E Major and A Minor, we are won over straight away by the solidity of his concept, the great beauty of the sonority with its long phrases and a discourse which is constantly expressive. His parents, who are not remotely musicians, would have preferred for him to be a great tennis player, but fate had other plans for this strong-willed teenager with a dazzling smile. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 25, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
Violinist Daniel Lozakovich, signed to the Deutsche Grammophon label at 15, was just 19 when this reading of Beethoven's Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61, appeared in 2020. He was certainly the prodigy of the moment, and the Beethoven concerto, with its deceptively simple themes, is a common place for prodigies to be tripped up. It doesn't happen here. With the help of the firm hand of Valery Gergiev, leading the Munich Philharmonic, Lozakovich offers a genuinely fresh reading of the Beethoven concerto. It's not so much in the first movement, although Lozakovich and Gergiev render the broad strokes of the music cleanly. Lozakovich plays the Fritz Kreisler cadenza, which nicely sets up the rhythmic freedom to come in the slow movement. Here, the young artist is exceptional, adding both rubato and rhythmic articulation to the usually flowing melody. The finale brings a logical conclusion to the rhythmic relaxation of the middle movement as Lozakovich takes the folkish theme at a quick clip and injects a high level of tension. It adds up to a Beethoven violin concerto that's exciting, logically put together, and in every way wise beyond its performer's years. Lozakovich rings the curtain down with another unorthodox choice: a movement from one of Bach's unaccompanied sonatas for solo violin. This is something Kreisler himself might have admired, and Lozakovich is clearly one to watch. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 18, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
Violinist Daniel Lozakovich was already a veteran at 18, having made his debut at age nine and signed to Deutsche Grammophon at 15. It may seem that each year brings a prodigal new violinist, but Lozakovich, a charismatic soul who boxes on the side, bow hand be damned, is one of the best. His Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35, is muscular and unafraid of a little gravel in the tone. Sample his finale, a broad, arch-Russian thing where he is ideally backed by his mentor, Vladimir Spivakov, leading the new National Philharmonic Orchestra of Russia. Lozakovich grabs your attention from the start but never overplays the transitions. Really, though, there are a lot of good Tchaikovsky concertos out there, and the biggest news here is the diverse set of short Tchaikovsky pieces, the stuff of violin concerts a hundred years ago, most of which have passed through the hands of arrangers at some point. Done without full commitment, they're mawkish; done with the abandon of Lozakovich, they're delightful. They include the titular None but the Lonely Heart, from the Romances, Op. 6, arranged for violin and piano (the piano does tend to come out of nowhere) by Mischa Elman. It's all arch-Romantic material, played by a young violinist who gets it, and who promises great things. © TiVo
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Classical - Released June 8, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
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Classical - Released September 25, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
Violinist Daniel Lozakovich, signed to the Deutsche Grammophon label at 15, was just 19 when this reading of Beethoven's Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61, appeared in 2020. He was certainly the prodigy of the moment, and the Beethoven concerto, with its deceptively simple themes, is a common place for prodigies to be tripped up. It doesn't happen here. With the help of the firm hand of Valery Gergiev, leading the Munich Philharmonic, Lozakovich offers a genuinely fresh reading of the Beethoven concerto. It's not so much in the first movement, although Lozakovich and Gergiev render the broad strokes of the music cleanly. Lozakovich plays the Fritz Kreisler cadenza, which nicely sets up the rhythmic freedom to come in the slow movement. Here, the young artist is exceptional, adding both rubato and rhythmic articulation to the usually flowing melody. The finale brings a logical conclusion to the rhythmic relaxation of the middle movement as Lozakovich takes the folkish theme at a quick clip and injects a high level of tension. It adds up to a Beethoven violin concerto that's exciting, logically put together, and in every way wise beyond its performer's years. Lozakovich rings the curtain down with another unorthodox choice: a movement from one of Bach's unaccompanied sonatas for solo violin. This is something Kreisler himself might have admired, and Lozakovich is clearly one to watch. © TiVo
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Classical - Released May 11, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released September 13, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released September 11, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 4, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)