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Classical - Released February 9, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
The subject matter of this collection of classic music from (mostly) Hollywood seems a major departure from violinist Daniel Hope's previous focus on music contending with the Nazi cultural orbit, but actually it's a logical step: a great deal of Hollywood film music was composed by refugees from Germany, and the stylistic world they created continues to resonate today. There are several good recordings of this repertory by young violinists, but Hope's stands out. Partly it's because Hope's big, richly sentimental sound fits this repertory well. Partly it's because he varies the program effectively with the full Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35, of Erich Korngold, and an appearance by none other than Sting in Hanns Eisler's The Secret Marriage, while still finding the core that connects all these pieces. Partly it's that Hope finds some unusual things that connect with the rest of the program: a couple of German film scores from the early 1930s, and the German melody better known as As Time Goes By, from the film Casablanca. And partly it's the variety and sequence of arrangements running from Jascha Heifetz down to the present day. The result is a fine outing that will satisfy anyone in the mood for big film themes, but also those who are seriously interested in film music. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Violinist and composer Joseph Joachim was a central figure of Romanticism, famous as a personal friend of Johannes Brahms and as an arbiter of musical taste who was professionally associated with many of the 19th century's greatest musicians. Daniel Hope's The Romantic Violinist: A Celebration of Joseph Joachim paints an appealing portrait through selections of Joachim's own music, as well as short pieces by Brahms, Clara Schumann, Antonin Dvorák, Franz Schubert, and the Violin Concerto No. 1 by Max Bruch. Joachim had a hand in editing this concerto, as well as in adding details to violin concertos by others, and he was generous in contributing his technical knowledge to composers, as well as inspiring them to write some of the most eloquent pieces in the repertoire for him. This CD presents Hope's 2010 performance of the Bruch concerto, along with Brahms' Hungarian Dances No. 1 and No. 5, Joachim's Notturno, and Dvorák's Humoresque with the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Sakari Oramo. For the rest of the tracks, Hope is accompanied by pianist Sebastian Knauer, except in Brahms' Geistliches Wiegenlied, where he is joined by mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter and pianist Bengt Forsberg. This mix of orchestral, chamber, and vocal music gives the disc considerable variety and avoids the pitfall of offering only one major work with a lot of filler. Indeed, Hope brings ample personality and skill to make the program compelling to the very end, and the changes of instrumentation and textures keep the album from being monochromatic. As a tribute to Joachim, this album does him the favor of showing his many sides, and presents him not only as a virtuoso, but as a complete musician. © TiVo
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Classical - Released April 20, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
This Deutsche Grammophon release captures an exceptional group of live performances from New York's Alice Tully Hall in early 2015. It was recorded well, mastered, and, remarkably, on sale by the end of April of that year. That's what the old major labels need more of: the agility to spot something good that's happening and follow through on it. The listener's eye may be drawn first to the name of Mahler on an album of piano quartets. Indeed, the 16-year-old Mahler, as a first-year student at the Vienna Conservatory, composed at least one movement of a Piano Quartet in A minor; rarely recorded, it opens the program here. Only its large dimensions (with final violin cadenza) and perhaps a bit of angst hint at the Mahler to come; otherwise it's in a purely Brahmsian vein, but it's entirely competent, and it makes a reasonable curtain raiser. The bigger attraction is the pair of performances of the standard Schumann Piano Quartet in E flat major, Op. 47, and Brahms Piano Quartet in G minor, Op. 25. They're gutsy and passionate, with the motivic thread of the Brahms never getting lost in the flood of emotion. The piano work of Wu Han, ranging from quietly grazing the keys to sharp, agitated accents, anchors the performances in a way that will keep listeners coming back. The four players here are neither an established group nor musical strangers to each other; they are friends and close associates, a combination that can sometimes produce extraordinary chamber performances like the one here. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 29, 2021 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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The serenade in the Baroque era was an actual functional genre of music, played outdoors for the pleasure of assembled guests. Serenades were light but not insubstantial pieces, and as musical language changed, the serenade persisted, offering, in the words of annotator Corinne Holtz, "islands of happiness" among weightier pieces. The examples here by Tchaikovsky and Elgar, composers not known for smiles, are ideal, and violinist/conductor Daniel Hope and the Zürcher Kammerorchester catch the lovely balance between late Romantic Russian melody and Classical forms that has made the Tchaikovsky Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48, so perennially popular. Tchaikovsky and Elgar were very different composers, but in Hope's hands, their serenades fit together perfectly. Most striking, perhaps, is the Mozart serenade Eine kleine Nachtmusik, K. 525, which is placed at the end. By the time Mozart wrote his serenade, the form had already outgrown its outdoor origins and become concert music, and Hope presents it from a 19th century perspective; his reading is unusually vigorous, not delicately Mozartian, but in this context, it works beautifully. As a whole, the program is genuinely joyous. Deutsche Grammophon's sound from the ZKO-Haus in Zurich is over-resonant for music that still basically had chamber dimensions, but that is about the only quibble regarding a thoroughly enjoyable outing from Hope. © TiVo
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Classical - Released August 14, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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It's not entirely clear where Daniel Hope's 2020 album Hope@Home was recorded: the location, except for one track recorded at the Frauenkirche in Dresden, is given merely as "Berlin." If it was indeed recorded at the violinist's home, he has a space with an unusually live acoustic that is somewhat at odds with the impression of intimacy that he seeks to convey. That's one of the few complaints here, however, for Hope has, in many ways, made a virtue of necessity. His program is built around a long list of guests, as if in the manner of a home musical soirée, including both instrumentalists and singers. The pianist on the majority of the tracks is Christoph Israel, who also serves as arranger, and it is the variety of these that really makes the album. Hope manages to pull off the idea of having a large group of talented house guests experimenting at the piano, and this is not easy to do with a convincing quality of spontaneity. Consider the unusual combination of Falla's "Asturiana" with Rudyard Kipling's poem "If," spoken by Iris Berben, or a yet more unexpected America the Beautiful. The main sequence of the program consists of a mix of classical (Schubert and Brahms) and popular American, British, and continental European songs. It may be calibrated to appeal to varied audiences, but it is relaxed, fun, often ingenious, and quite lovely. © James Manheim /TiVo
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Classical - Released February 21, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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The Belle Époque, the era lasting from the end of the Franco-Prussian War to the beginning of World War I (1871-1914), was a diverse period; the name is indicative at best of general tendencies such as peace and prosperity, along with darker trends. Violinist Daniel Hope's Belle Époque album contains music from various countries in a wide range of styles, and it's not quite a concept album. However, it does hang together in interesting ways. Hope's program mixes orchestral pieces and chamber music; this could easily have happened in a late 19th century concert, which might have thrown in some solo piano music as well. His selections from both the salon and the learned studio, pieces like Fritz Kreisler's Liebesleid, bump up against Webern's Four Pieces, Op. 7, with most of the music somewhere in between. What's fascinating is that the light and heavy works seem to have things to say to each other. It helps that Hope unearths some less familiar items and recruits enthusiastic collaborators. The Concerto for violin, piano, and string quartet of Chausson (here played with a string orchestra) is an unusual and moody work, and there are such novelties as Schoenberg's totally tonal Notturno for violin, harp, and string orchestra. Several pieces make use of Jane Berthe's harp, an instrument that doesn't always get its due in 19th century programming. The chamber music disc is full of attractive and rarely played items, such as Alexander Zemlinsky's Serenade and George Enescu's Impromptu concertant, and if the Webern seems to come out of nowhere, an audience of the early 20th century might not have heard it that way. Both enjoyable and innovative, like so much of Hope's work. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 5, 2021 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Daniel Hope first fell for the polystylistic music of Alfred Schnittke as a teenager. Then, in the early 1990s, he got to know the Russian Soviet-era composer personally, over a series of meetings and conversations. Now that deep and long-standing relationship is palpable across every second of this recital with fellow acclaimed Schnittke interpreter, Alexey Botvinov. Schnittke's multi-faceted oeuvre for violin is full of emotional subtleties to tease out, too. For instance, the Congratulatory Rondo of 1974 is on the face of it a sweetly dainty Baroque pastiche, but lurking below the surface Schnittke is giving us “corpses wearing make-up” – just so subtly that Shostakovich's ironic scherzos sound bombastically crass by comparison. The degree of fine nuance with which Hope and Botvinov capture both elements is almost superhuman, because while the Rondo's darker side is at its most obvious as Hope's tone scratches and scrapes through the fortissimo outburst, there's also a hint of mechanical disingenuousness across the rest. Just so barely perceptible that in order to hear it you may even have to first listen closely to their reading of the other Baroque pastiche written two years earlier, the Suite in the Old Style which Schnittke wrote “once to write completely naively”. Most powerful of all, though, is the impression of corrupted purity and sinisterly advancing decay that the pair have captured in Stille Nacht, Schnittke's chilling 1978 illustration of the gulf between the official propaganda of the Soviet regime, and the grim reality of daily life. Hope's low, concluding siren wail glissandi off the back of Botvinov's bleak bell tolls are eerie in the extreme. Then there's the spellbinding intensity they bring to the Largo of the First Violin Sonata of 1963, its violin part unfurling as one long, constantly extending line of constant colouristic development, and the whole rendered all the more affecting by Hope's capacity for sweetness of tone. Whether the idea of a Schnittke recital appeals to you on paper or not, this is a must-listen. © Charlotte Gardner/Qobuz
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Classical - Released March 3, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Following up on his successful Vivaldi Recomposed album, English violinist Daniel Hope offers a new take on Vivaldi's Four Seasons that's not as outwardly experimental, but certainly equally novel. After an attractive, but not pathbreaking, set of the Four Seasons themselves, you get 12 pieces, each corresponding to one month of the year, plus a short Brahms encore. The connections of these pieces to their specific months may be pretty tenuous (February, an excerpt from Rameau's Les Indes galantes, is the most tenuous), but there's an X factor of sheer adventurousness in the album's favor. Hope moves from traditional repertory (Tchaikovsky, Schumann) to Amazing Grace (in an odd, electric rock arrangement), Max Richter from the earlier Vivaldi album, and the electronic musicians Aphex Twin and Chilly Gonzales (with one work by the latter, Les doutes d'août, recorded here for the first time). It testifies to the strength of Hope's musical personality that, although he's in no way a self-aggrandizing player, all this music hangs together and for the most part serves its intended function. This is the kind of album that one can imagine would appeal to listeners with little background in classical music, who don't distinguish rigidly between what's classical music and what isn't. Recommended for crossover audiences. © TiVo

Classical - Released December 12, 2020 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Classical - Released March 19, 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released February 9, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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British violinist Daniel Hope has emerged as a star of the instrument, winning top awards for recordings of both mainstream repertory and more unusual concepts. Here he tries a little of both, and the effort, although not entirely clear in its aims, unearths some interesting music. Hope speaks of the titular "journey to Mozart" as a personal exploration, but the bulk of the program consists not of Mozart, but of the composer's predecessors and contemporaries. So the journey might just as easily be that of the progression of Austrian music to the heights it reached with Mozart. From that perspective, Hope is onto some nice finds: the slow movement by Josef Myslivecek and the Romance by Johann Peter Salomon are arresting tunes. The Haydn Violin Concerto in G major, Hob. 7/4 is competently performed (whether it's really by Haydn or not), and with the marquee attraction, the Mozart Violin Concerto No. 3 in G major, K. 216, Hope is clearly finding a groove with the Zurich Chamber Orchestra, of which he has become conductor-from-the-violin. Recommended, although not if what you're after is a Mozart hits album. A rather unorthodox entry in Hope's growing catalog, but one with some lovely moments. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 3, 2021 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Conceived and created during one of the most difficult years ever for the music and culture industry (2020), the star violinist sends us a spiritual, but above all intimate and positive sign. A very personal selection of works that open the mind and the heart trail around the centerpiece "Misa Criolla" (here in a new arrangement for violin and orchestra). The repertoire contains many well-known works such as Elgar's Nimrod, Albinoni's & Giazotto's Adagio in G minor and "Amazing Grace'. Daniel Hope teamed up with singers such as baritone Thomas Hampson and jazz-singer Colin Rich as well as his orchestra Zürcher Kammerorchester. © Deutsche Grammophon
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Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released April 20, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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This Deutsche Grammophon release captures an exceptional group of live performances from New York's Alice Tully Hall in early 2015. It was recorded well, mastered, and, remarkably, on sale by the end of April of that year. That's what the old major labels need more of: the agility to spot something good that's happening and follow through on it. The listener's eye may be drawn first to the name of Mahler on an album of piano quartets. Indeed, the 16-year-old Mahler, as a first-year student at the Vienna Conservatory, composed at least one movement of a Piano Quartet in A minor; rarely recorded, it opens the program here. Only its large dimensions (with final violin cadenza) and perhaps a bit of angst hint at the Mahler to come; otherwise it's in a purely Brahmsian vein, but it's entirely competent, and it makes a reasonable curtain raiser. The bigger attraction is the pair of performances of the standard Schumann Piano Quartet in E flat major, Op. 47, and Brahms Piano Quartet in G minor, Op. 25. They're gutsy and passionate, with the motivic thread of the Brahms never getting lost in the flood of emotion. The piano work of Wu Han, ranging from quietly grazing the keys to sharp, agitated accents, anchors the performances in a way that will keep listeners coming back. The four players here are neither an established group nor musical strangers to each other; they are friends and close associates, a combination that can sometimes produce extraordinary chamber performances like the one here. © TiVo
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Concertos - Released January 1, 2006 | Warner Classics International

Just because you can play the fast outer movements of Bach's violin concertos at supersonic speeds is no reason to play them at supersonic speeds. After all, the concertos are usually considered student works -- supremely elevated student works by one of the greatest composers in western music, true, but still student works -- and a virtuoso with Daniel Hope's talent doesn't need to show off by tearing through them. But show off he does, without restrain, without pity, and without remorse and the results are performances that verge on caricature. And just because you can play the slow inner movements of Bach's violin concertos with an extra half ton of extra emotional weight attached to each phrase is no reason to crush the music under your bow. But Hope, a player who has previously turned in superlative performances of Berg and Shostakovich's violin concertos, cannot resist retro-fitting Bach's concertos with neo-modernist expressivity and the results are performances that border on parody. And just because the Chamber Orchestra of Europe can keep up with Hope and flutist Jaime Martin and harpsichordist Kristian Bezuidenhout can race alongside him in the outer movements of the Fifth Brandenburg Concerto is no reason to seek out this recording except as an example of what can happen when grandstanding takes priority over artistry. Warner Classics' 2006 digital sound is so clear as to be nearly transparent and so warm as to be almost real. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released February 5, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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The classical tribute album can be a turgid affair, but not in the case of this tribute to Yehudi Menuhin by violinist Daniel Hope. Hope was Menuhin's protégé from an early age, and he absorbed his mentor's soaring, almost spiritual tone. Better than that, My Tribute to Yehudi Menuhin captures the exceptionally wide range of Menuhin's musical interests, which in the latter part of his career took him from jazz to Indian music to pop and beyond. Unlike many other virtuosos at the top level, Menuhin was often on the forefront of new musical developments. He revived the lost Violin Concerto in D minor of the 13-year-old Mendelssohn, recording it three times, and Hope's performance effectively captures Menuhin's brilliant way with the finale. In the age of ubiquitous Vivaldi it's hard to remember that he was once a novelty, especially for a top-level player, and Hope's performance of the Concerto for two violins and strings, RV 522 (Simos Papanas is the second soloist) draws on how Vivaldi was performed in the 1950s. There is music by Bartók, to whom Menuhin was close, and by Steve Reich, commissioned (remarkably) by Menuhin and Edna Mitchell. Hope does not stick exclusively to Menuhin's repertoire; Bechara El Khoury's Unfinished Journey for violin and strings is an original commission by Hope, but it seems likely that Menuhin would have enjoyed it. This is a tribute that exudes real familiarity and warmth. © TiVo
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Classical - Released November 20, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released July 8, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released August 14, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

It's not entirely clear where Daniel Hope's 2020 album Hope@Home was recorded: the location, except for one track recorded at the Frauenkirche in Dresden, is given merely as "Berlin." If it was indeed recorded at the violinist's home, he has a space with an unusually live acoustic that is somewhat at odds with the impression of intimacy that he seeks to convey. That's one of the few complaints here, however, for Hope has, in many ways, made a virtue of necessity. His program is built around a long list of guests, as if in the manner of a home musical soirée, including both instrumentalists and singers. The pianist on the majority of the tracks is Christoph Israel, who also serves as arranger, and it is the variety of these that really makes the album. Hope manages to pull off the idea of having a large group of talented house guests experimenting at the piano, and this is not easy to do with a convincing quality of spontaneity. Consider the unusual combination of Falla's "Asturiana" with Rudyard Kipling's poem "If," spoken by Iris Berben, or a yet more unexpected America the Beautiful. The main sequence of the program consists of a mix of classical (Schubert and Brahms) and popular American, British, and continental European songs. It may be calibrated to appeal to varied audiences, but it is relaxed, fun, often ingenious, and quite lovely. © James Manheim /TiVo