Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD£13.99

Pop - Released March 2, 2005 | Parlophone Sweden

As the sticker on the album cover proclaims, the Caesars' fourth album (and second to receive U.S. distribution) Paper Tigers "features '"Jerk It Out"' as heard in the iPod Shuffle commercial." It's understandable that the band and Astralwerks want to capitalize on the song's success, but this is now the third Caesars' release to include it. "Jerk It Out" originally appeared on the band's 2002 album Love for the Streets, was collected on the 2003 comp 39 Minutes of Bliss (In an Otherwise Meaningless World), and now appears on this album as an extended remix. For better or worse, "Jerk It Out" remains the best song on all three of these albums; even though the remix of it dilutes the momentum that made people pay attention to the song in the first place, it still has more charisma than the rest of Paper Tigers. 39 Minutes of Bliss (In an Otherwise Meaningless World) suggested that the Caesars were becoming too polished and contained to really work as a garage rock-inspired outfit, and on this album the band ditches that sound -- save for a few spiky Farfisa organ riffs here and there -- for a lusher, poppier approach. Occasionally, as on the end-of-summer power ballad "Spirit" that begins Paper Tigers, this sound works, but more often than not, it ends up being ambitious but not distinctive. Songs such as "Out There," "May the Rain" and the aptly named "Throwaway" have pretty melodies and harmonies, but just aren't that memorable. Often, the intricate production ends up overpowering the album's weak songs (although the evocative, Mellotron-laden "Winter Song" comes close to a happy balance between sound and songwriting). "It's Not the Fall That Hurts" -- which keeps some of the hooky, nervy energy of "Jerk It Out" without being a blatant rewrite of that song -- and the cheery pop of "Soulchaser" are two of the too-few highlights on Paper Tigers. Ultimately, it's a flimsy album; though it's pleasant enough as background music, upon closer listening it falls apart. © Heather Phares /TiVo
CD£4.49

Pop - Released February 28, 2003 | Parlophone Sweden

CD£7.99

Pop - Released March 3, 2008 | Parlophone Sweden

Side B outweighs Side A on the Caesars' fifth album, which features the band's familiar mix of garage rock guitars and power pop melodies. This is the first Caesars release in years not to feature "Jerk It Out," the Farfisa-fueled song that orchestrated iPod commercials through the mid-2000s, and only a few songs here (including the Swedish single "No Tomorrow") feature contributions from that retro instrument. Instead, the band places an emphasis on guitar hooks, most of which are pleasantly rough around the edges but fail to flaunt much staying power. That's the problem with Strawberry Weed; it's an entirely enjoyable album that lacks a high-caliber "Jerk It Out" equivalent. Had the Caesars existed during the '60s -- a decade that this album so consciously emulates -- Strawberry Weed would've been overshadowed by the band's influences, from the Sonics to the 13th Floor Elevators. The group's appeal, then, owes a good deal to the 21st century, since few contemporary bands flaunt the attitude of the '60s (if not necessarily the decade's hooks) as the Caesars. And while nothing on Strawberry Weed can rival "Jerk It Out," the album is still one of the Caesars' best in recent memory, as there are enough affable pop songs to override the filler that clogged Paper Tigers. Situated halfway through the set list, the charming title track kicks off a string of tracks peppered with handclaps, background harmonies, and guitar tremolo. The album ends on a high note (perhaps literally -- the last song, "New Years Day," dissolves into a psychedelic acid rock freak-out that takes a page from the band's druggy forebears), and although Strawberry Weed doesn't lodge its melodies into the listener's brain, it still makes a good case for repeated listens. © Andrew Leahey /TiVo
CD£13.99

Pop - Released May 30, 2003 | Parlophone Sweden

The "rock" revival of the early 2000s sent record labels into a tizzy; everyone went looking for their own version of the Hives, the Vines, the Stripes, and so forth. It was a good time to be in a rock band and a good time to be a fan of rock music but, inevitably, as it has happened throughout the history of rock from rockabilly to grunge, the frenzied hunt for bands is bound to start to turn up some dross. Speaking of which, here you have electronica label Astralwerks' entry in the rock sweepstakes, with the Caesars. The group hails from rock hotbed Sweden and used to be called the Twelve Caesars. Just to add to the confusion that they are called Caesars Palace in Sweden. They released a record in 1998 for Minty Fresh that ended up in cutout bins. Seven of the 12 songs on 39 Minutes of Bliss (In an Otherwise Meaningless World) were also on that disc. They play semimelodic, garage rock-influenced rock that manages some decent hooks (the chorus of "Crackin' Up," the good cover of the Endd's "Out of My Hands," the blippy organ on the peppy "Jerk It Out") but remains bland and generic. The guitars are too processed sounding, the riffs they play are tired, the vocals are indistinctive, and the whole endeavor seems very secondhand, as every song sounds familiar in an unpleasant way. The lyrics are pretty clunky too. There is just nothing happening here that anyone needs to hear. The Caesars may get compared to the Hives or the White Stripes, but a more apt comparison would be to Smash Mouth or Third Eye Blind or some other band that has the sound but no soul. Why Astralwerks chose them is a mystery. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
CD£16.99

Pop - Released April 21, 2003 | Parlophone Sweden

The "rock" revival of the early 2000s sent record labels into a tizzy; everyone went looking for their own version of the Hives, the Vines, the Stripes, and so forth. It was a good time to be in a rock band and a good time to be a fan of rock music but, inevitably, as it has happened throughout the history of rock from rockabilly to grunge, the frenzied hunt for bands is bound to start to turn up some dross. Speaking of which, here you have electronica label Astralwerks' entry in the rock sweepstakes, with the Caesars. The group hails from rock hotbed Sweden and used to be called the Twelve Caesars. Just to add to the confusion that they are called Caesars Palace in Sweden. They released a record in 1998 for Minty Fresh that ended up in cutout bins. Seven of the 12 songs on 39 Minutes of Bliss (In an Otherwise Meaningless World) were also on that disc. They play semimelodic, garage rock-influenced rock that manages some decent hooks (the chorus of "Crackin' Up," the good cover of the Endd's "Out of My Hands," the blippy organ on the peppy "Jerk It Out") but remains bland and generic. The guitars are too processed sounding, the riffs they play are tired, the vocals are indistinctive, and the whole endeavor seems very secondhand, as every song sounds familiar in an unpleasant way. The lyrics are pretty clunky too. There is just nothing happening here that anyone needs to hear. The Caesars may get compared to the Hives or the White Stripes, but a more apt comparison would be to Smash Mouth or Third Eye Blind or some other band that has the sound but no soul. Why Astralwerks chose them is a mystery. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
CD£16.99

Pop - Released July 7, 2004 | Parlophone Sweden

CD£15.49

Pop - Released February 23, 2005 | Parlophone Sweden

As the sticker on the album cover proclaims, the Caesars' fourth album (and second to receive U.S. distribution) Paper Tigers "features '"Jerk It Out"' as heard in the iPod Shuffle commercial." It's understandable that the band and Astralwerks want to capitalize on the song's success, but this is now the third Caesars' release to include it. "Jerk It Out" originally appeared on the band's 2002 album Love for the Streets, was collected on the 2003 comp 39 Minutes of Bliss (In an Otherwise Meaningless World), and now appears on this album as an extended remix. For better or worse, "Jerk It Out" remains the best song on all three of these albums; even though the remix of it dilutes the momentum that made people pay attention to the song in the first place, it still has more charisma than the rest of Paper Tigers. 39 Minutes of Bliss (In an Otherwise Meaningless World) suggested that the Caesars were becoming too polished and contained to really work as a garage rock-inspired outfit, and on this album the band ditches that sound -- save for a few spiky Farfisa organ riffs here and there -- for a lusher, poppier approach. Occasionally, as on the end-of-summer power ballad "Spirit" that begins Paper Tigers, this sound works, but more often than not, it ends up being ambitious but not distinctive. Songs such as "Out There," "May the Rain" and the aptly named "Throwaway" have pretty melodies and harmonies, but just aren't that memorable. Often, the intricate production ends up overpowering the album's weak songs (although the evocative, Mellotron-laden "Winter Song" comes close to a happy balance between sound and songwriting). "It's Not the Fall That Hurts" -- which keeps some of the hooky, nervy energy of "Jerk It Out" without being a blatant rewrite of that song -- and the cheery pop of "Soulchaser" are two of the too-few highlights on Paper Tigers. Ultimately, it's a flimsy album; though it's pleasant enough as background music, upon closer listening it falls apart. © Heather Phares /TiVo
CD£1.99

Pop - Released March 11, 2005 | Parlophone Sweden

CD£5.49

Pop - Released May 31, 2014 | WM Sweden

CD£8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released May 20, 1996 | Busy Bee

CD£1.99

Pop - Released July 13, 2007 | Parlophone Sweden

CD£2.49

Pop - Released May 30, 2008 | Parlophone Sweden

CD£4.49

Pop - Released May 31, 2014 | WM Sweden

CD£2.49

Pop - Released May 31, 2014 | WM Sweden

CD£2.49

Pop - Released May 31, 2014 | WM Sweden

CD£3.99

Pop - Released May 29, 2015 | WM Sweden

CD£3.99

Pop - Released May 29, 2015 | WM Sweden

CD£2.49

Pop - Released May 29, 2015 | WM Sweden

CD£1.99

Pop - Released May 6, 2005 | Parlophone Sweden

CD£2.49

Pop - Released May 11, 2005 | Parlophone Sweden