Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD£12.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2002 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

10cc is one of those bands that creates problems for the compilers of compilations because they changed record companies, spreading their catalog around. The good news, from the viewpoint of American fans, is that most of the group's U.S. hits reside in the archives of one of the major labels, Universal Music, which is responsible for the 20th Century Masters - The Millennium Collection series of midline-priced best-of collections. 10cc began life on the UK Records label, for which the band scored a series of British hits in 1972-1974, none of which are featured here. The only one of those to reach the U.S. charts was "Rubber Bullets." Then the group switched to Mercury for the 1975 British hit "Life Is a Minestrone" (included here). They made their American breakthrough with the pop ballad "I'm Not in Love" later that year. (Both it and its non-LP B-side "Channel Swimmer" are included.) "I'm Not in Love" was not really typical of this eclectic, arty band, but subsequent singles scored only modestly in the U.S. (while continuing to hit the Top Ten at home) until another pop ballad, "The Things We Do for Love," restored them to favor in America in early 1977. They remained basically a two-hit wonder stateside, but this collection, which features eight of their nine U.S. chart entries, gives a good sense of their ambitious, conceptual approach to music, an approach that occasionally embraced light, romantic pop tunes like their two big American hits. Of course, a comprehensive collection would have to include the early hits, but for U.S. fans who heard the band on the radio between 1975 and 1979, this inexpensive set should do fine. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
From
CD£8.99

Pop - Released January 1, 1996 | EMI

10cc's third album, The Original Soundtrack, finally scored them a major hit in the United States, and rightly so; "I'm Not in Love" walked a fine line between self-pity and self-parody with its weepy tale of a boy who isn't in love (really!), and the marvelously lush production and breathy vocals allowed the tune to work beautifully either as a sly joke or at face value. The album's opener, "Une Nuit a Paris," was nearly as marvelous; a sly and often hilarious extended parody of both cinematic stereotypes of life and love in France and overblown European pop. And side one's closer, "Blackmail," was a witty tale of sex and extortion gone wrong, with a superb guitar solo embroidering the ride-out. That's all on side one; side two, however, is a bit spottier, with two undistinguished tunes, "Brand New Day" and "Flying Junk," nearly dragging the proceedings to a halt before the band rallied the troops for a happy ending with the hilarious "The Film of Our Love." The Original Soundtrack's best moments rank with the finest work 10cc ever released; however, at the same time it also displayed what was to become their Achilles' heel -- the inability to make an entire album as strong and memorable as those moments. © Mark Deming /TiVo
From
CD£8.99

Pop - Released January 1, 1997 | EMI

When Kevin Godley and Lol Creme left 10cc in 1976 to pursue a solo career, many thought it was the death knell for the group. However, Eric Stewart and Graham Gouldman kept the group alive as a duo (with the assistance of percussionist Paul Burgess) and turned in a surprisingly solid album with 1977's Deceptive Bends. It may lack the devil-may-care wackiness that popped up on previous 10cc albums, but it makes up for it by crafting a series of lush, catchy pop songs that are witty in their own right. Deceptive Bends also produced a pair of notable hits for the group: "Good Morning Judge" told the comical tale of a career criminal over a hook-laden, surprisingly funky pop backing while "The Things We Do for Love" was an irresistible Beatles pastiche that showcased 10cc's mastery of pop vocal harmonies. "People in Love," a surprisingly straightforward ballad built on a gorgeous string arrangement, also became a modest chart success. The remainder of the material doesn't stand out as sharply as these hits, but each of the tracks offers up plenty of naggingly catchy pop hooks, oodles of catchy riffs, and surprising twists in their arrangements. Highlights among the non-hit tracks include "Marriage Bureau Rendezvous," a satire of dating services set to a lilting soft rock melody, and "You've Got a Cold," a portrait of illness-influenced misery set to a percolating pop melody. The only place where Deceptive Bends slips is on "Feel the Benefit," the lengthy medley that closes the album. Its excessive length and hazy lyrics make it less satisfying than the album's shorter tunes, but it is kept afloat by a catchy, mock-Spanish midsection and some lovely string arrangements. All in all, Deceptive Bends is the finest achievement of 10cc's post-Godley and Creme lineup and well worth a spin for anyone who enjoyed Sheet Music or The Original Soundtrack. © Donald A. Guarisco /TiVo
From
CD£8.99

Pop - Released January 1, 1997 | EMI

After proving they could keep 10cc alive as a duo act with 1977's successful Deceptive Bends, Eric Stewart and Graham Gouldman pressed on in 1978 with Bloody Tourists. Although it scored some notable hits, it was a less consistent and less memorable affair than its predecessor. The problem with Bloody Tourists is that it feels like a group of session musicians trying to come up with songs in the 10cc style instead of a proper 10cc album. The eccentric humor that once flowed freely feels forced on this album: "Reds In My Bed" is a lame stab at Cold War satire that never really succeeds in saying anything while "Shock On The Tube (Don't Want Love)" tries to be daring with its tale of a subway sex fantasy and instead comes off as smutty and dull. Another problem is that the music propping up these narratives is lacking in both hooks and inspiration: the backing track for "Take These Chains" is a dull attempt at rockabilly that sounds like an especially poppy Eagles outtake and "The Anonymous Alcoholic" has a disco-parody portion that merely sounds like a mediocre example of the music it is supposedly sending up. However, the album's singles present a few bright moments: "For You And I" is a lovely ballad that fortifies its attractive melody with some strong vocal harmonies and "Dreadlock Holiday" chronicles the exploits of a hapless tourist in Jamaican against a catchy pop-reggae backdrop. Sadly, these are the first two tracks on the album so when they have passed there isn't much to look forward to. In the end, Bloody Tourists is competent enough to keep the 10cc's hardcore fans happy but the casual listener is advised to track down its hits on a compilation. © Donald A. Guarisco /TiVo
From
CD£8.99

Pop - Released January 1, 1997 | EMI

After scoring their commercial breakthrough with "I'm Not in Love" from 1975's The Original Soundtrack, 10cc continued to build on their good fortune with How Dare You. It didn't spawn another massive hit like "I'm Not in Love," but it is a well-crafted album that shows off 10cc's eccentric humor and pop smarts in equal measure. This time, the hit singles were "I'm Mandy Fly Me" and "Art for Art's Sake." The first tune is the fanciful tale of a plane crash victim saved from death by the stewardess of his dreams that plays out a poppy mock-exotica musical backdrop while the second is a tongue-in-cheek parody of commercial-minded artists set to a rocking, cowbell-driven beat. Elsewhere, How Dare You pursues a similar mix of zany humor and pop hooks: "Iceberg" brings its tale of a frigid romantic partner to life with an incredibly intricate and jazzy vocal melody, and "I Wanna Rule the World" is a witty tale of a dictator-in-training with enough catchy riffs and vocal harmonies for two or three songs. How Dare You loses a bit of steam on its second side when the songs' tempos start to slow down, but "Rock 'N' Roll Lullaby" and "Don't Hang Up" keep the listener involved through a combination of melodic songwriting and typically well-crafted arrangements. In the end, How Dare You never hits the giddy heights of The Original Soundtrack but it remains a solid album of witty pop songs that will satisfy anyone with a yen for 10cc. © Donald A. Guarisco /TiVo
From
CD£14.99

Rock - Released September 23, 2016 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

British rock band 10cc present their latest compilation, I'm Not in Love: The Essential 10cc. This collection covers all the hits put out by the band in the 1970s and beyond, featuring tracks written by both Godley & Crème and Gouldman & Stewart, covering the arty and the pop-centric sides of the group. © Liam Martin /TiVo
From
CD£7.99

Rock - Released June 6, 2007 | Hipgnosis Songs

From
CD£22.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

2012's Classic Album Selection is a handsome, affordable box set containing paper-sleeve mini-LPs of 10cc's five most popular -- and best -- albums: The Original Soundtrack, How Dare You!, Deceptive Bends, Live and Let Live, and Bloody Tourists. This is an easy, convenient, and attractive way to get 10cc's best all at once. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Download not available
10cc has been subjected to countless compilations over the years -- the hits get recycled regularly and the early stuff for Jonathan King's U.K. Records gets shuffled around -- but they've never had a testament to their weird work until the 2012 box set Tenology. Running four CDs and one DVD, Tenology is certainly generous, but a case could be made that it could have been even longer, encompassing a disc of their early work making bubblegum for Strawberry Studios (in lieu of that, the 2003 Castle compilation, Strawberry Bubblegum serves as an excellent supplement to this), but what is here shows that 10cc was far stranger, savvier, funnier, and wilder than "I'm Not in Love" and "The Things We Do for Love" might suggest. Of course, their oddness was well-known during their '70s peak; they occupied a strange ground between Pink Floyd, Alan Parsons, Paul McCartney, and Cliff Richards, slick enough to slip onto the airwaves but at their heart clever-clever smart asses who just happened to prefer tight pop construction and lush studios to blues-driven space rock. The sequencing of this box highlights the group's preference for pop: the first two discs run through their singles, the third collects the band's hand-chosen album tracks, and the fourth has rarities and demos, all happening to be a little more concise than the cuts on the third. While the DVD is certainly for the diehards -- it has a BBC in Concert from 1974, some spots from Top of the Pops, all their promo videos, which are important as Kevin Godley & Lol Crème wound up as renowned music video directors in the '80s -- perhaps the best argument for Tenology is that it showcases the group's subtle, slick innovations and fertile imagination in a way not even their excellent albums do. Taking this all as a body of work, from those egregiously strange U.K. sides to the ultraglossy, late-'70s singles, it becomes clear that 10cc were one of the odd wonders of the '70s: a bunch of Beatles-loving eggheads on a mission to turn out perfect pop and having the chops to do so. It's lengthy, but anybody who was ever wondering if there was more to 10cc than the well-worn hits will find a rousing affirmative answer here. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD£7.99

Rock - Released June 6, 2007 | Hipgnosis Songs

From
CD£8.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

After the success of Bloody Tourists, and the artsy excess of Look Hear?, Eric Stewart and Graham Gouldman gave the rest of the band their walking papers, and recorded this album as a duo. Sounding fresh and energized, this was by far 10cc's best album since 1977's Deceptive Bends. Maintaining a mild case of the quirkiness of old, Stewart and Gouldman embrace some of their finest melodies on this release, allowing the songs to speak for themselves. "Don't Ask" is one of those great little pop songs that you think you've heard somewhere before, but haven't, and it should have been a massive single, but wasn't. "Memories," "Les Nouveaux Riches," and "Overdraft In Overdrive" all utilize a reggae backbeat, but are even more carefree than their 1978 single "Dreadlock Holiday!" Both members share the spotlight throughout, trading off lead and backing vocals with ease. Gouldman's vocals sound more confident than ever, while Stewart still sings like an angel (he'll melt your heart on "Don't Turn Me Away," and "Lying Here With You"). The only weak track in the bunch is the barroom blues track, "Listen With Your Eyes," which was probably written in their sleep. The U.K. and U.S. versions of the albums differ by a few tracks (the U.S. version replaces three songs with tracks recorded with Andrew Gold). Quite possibly the last great 10cc album, and certainly the last to sound like a true collaborative effort between Stewart and Gouldman. © Steve Schnee /TiVo
From
CD£8.99

Pop - Released February 1, 1977 | EMI

The time for a 10cc live album would have been as they toured The Original Soundtrack with one of the most adventurous -- not to mention musically extravagant -- shows of the age. Instead, they waited two more years, until the newly reduced Eric Stewart/Graham Gouldman-led lineup headed out to promote the first LP since the split, Deceptive Bends, buoyed by the fact that the hits just kept on coming. It is a fun listen on its own terms, a double-vinyl package that wraps a hard-hitting rock show around a good selection of hits. But it is also an unsatisfying venture, as it duplicates all but one track from Deceptive Bends, then avoids any reference to the Godley/Creme era by confining the hits to Stewart and Gouldman compositions alone. That this includes one song previously valued no higher than a B-side ("Waterfall") is an advantage of this approach; unfortunately, you also realize just how straightforward and rocky the duo's writing could be, and Live and Let Live emerges less a document of a great live performance than a desperate résumé, the surviving bandmembers so intent upon proving their own worth that they forgot what made the band so special in the first place. © Dave Thompson /TiVo
From
CD£8.99

Rock - Released March 28, 1980 | EMI

With 10cc's last album, Bloody Tourists, having spun off the monster hit "Dreadlock Holiday," it would be a very brave person indeed who could argue that the most consistently inventive band of the previous eight years had finally run out of steam. But there were clues; no follow-up hits on the last album, a certain lack of pizzazz on their most recent tours, and an incapacitating car accident that kept Eric Stewart immobile for almost nine months. Put all that together and, when Look Hear? did finally materialize, the surprise might have been that it was as good as it was. Which, to be honest, wasn't much. It was old news now that the departures of Godley and Creme had robbed the band of the left-field experimentation that made the earlier records such classics; this was the surviving duo's third album since then. But the enthusiasm, too, had gone. Songs on Look Hear? either struggled half-heartedly to amuse (the disco semi-parody "One Two Five," the odd "I Hate to Eat Alone"), or else they didn't do much of anything, beyond nailing a pleasant melody to some gentle words dripped slowly onto the rug. You listened and half of it went in one ear and out the other, and that is still the problem today. It's "OK." It's "not bad." It's "a bit bland." It's "ho hum." Two bonus tracks on the 7-Ts reissue include the single edit of "One Two Five" and its B-side, "Only Child." Neither adds nor subtracts anything from the main attraction, apart from further beautifying what is, surprisingly, the album's first domestic CD release. © Dave Thompson /TiVo
From
CD£8.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

After the rejuvenated excitement of 10 Out of 10, Eric Stewart and Graham Gouldman pulled in studio heavyweights like Steve Gadd and recorded this ambitious, but ultimately lukewarm album in 1983. All of the usual 10cc trademarks were in place: great melodies, heartbreaking harmonies, and inventive arrangements are in great abundance here. Unfortunately, the 10cc sense of humor is sorely lacking in this jungle, which casts a gray cloud over the whole album. Eric Stewart, one of rock's most sincere vocalists, sounds bored with the material, although he certainly does give it his best shot. There are some fabulous songs here, including the singles "Feel the Love" and "24 Hours," the finger-pointing "American Panorama," and the dramatic "Taxi Taxi," but with only eight songs to choose from, there's less margin for error. Not that there are any real errors here, but half the album sounds uninspired. To think that this was their 'swan song' until their reunion album nearly a decade later makes perfect sense. Perhaps they had run out steam, and couldn't take the band any further? And where is Graham Gouldman on this album? He's in there somewhere, handling various instruments and backing vocals, but surprisingly, does not handle any significant lead vocals on the album. (When one of your two vocalists does not sing lead on an album, there is some cause for concern). There are some scraps of Gouldman floating about, but not enough to satisfy the diehards. If you are an Eric Stewart fan, rejoice, because this is practically a solo album. If you are a Godley and Creme fan, then go back ten spaces because they left the band six years prior to this album! © Steve Schnee /TiVo
From
CD£40.49

Rock - Released July 14, 2017 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

From
CD£8.99

Pop - Released January 1, 1992 | Polydor Records

In the fall of 1991, it was announced that 10cc's original quartet of members had reconvened in Woodstock, to begin work on their first album together in 16 years. Of course it didn't happen like that; Kevin Godley and Lol Creme both had other careers to consider at that time, and the bulk of the new record was left to Eric Stewart and Graham Gouldman -- whose own tenure at the helm ended when they split the band in 1983. And it shows. Although the prodigals did contribute to the album by way of backing vocals, their presence was scarcely felt. Neither did producer Gary Katz add anything to the brew, as songs that sounded terrific as demos ("Welcome to Paradise" in particular) were simply plastered over with studio lushness by session men that the 10cc-ers themselves did not even know. The result is a polished piece of nothing, an album that owes nothing to the 10cc that listeners know and love, and not much to anything that was going on elsewhere on the music scene at that time. It simply sits in the corner humming quietly to itself, and it's easy to forget that it even exists. © Dave Thompson /TiVo
From
CD£15.99

Rock - Released July 14, 2017 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

From
CD£15.49

Rock - Released July 21, 2017 | Lemon

From
CD£0.79

Pop - Released October 30, 2006 | Hipgnosis Songs

From
CD£0.99

Pop - Released October 5, 2009 | Dome Records Ltd