Categories :

Albums

CD£7.99

Chamber Music - To be released July 17, 2020 | MV Cremona

Booklet
CD£7.19

Chamber Music - Released July 6, 2020 | Planet Blue Records USA

CD£10.79

Chamber Music - Released June 26, 2020 | Galileo Music Communication

CD£15.98

Chamber Music - Released June 12, 2020 | Glossa

HI-RES£12.78
CD£8.58

Chamber Music - Released April 10, 2020 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 étoiles de Classica
Having already attracted attention for his exceptional gifts, Bach entered the service of the Weimar court at the age of twenty-three. This was the start of the period known as his ‘early maturity’, in which his formal and expressive experiments reflect a significant interest in French music and ‘la belle danse’. The close intertwining of French and German styles is the dominant feature of this third volume in Benjamin Alard’s recording of the complete organ and harpsichord works. ‘A remarkable complete set of Bach’s keyboard music is gradually being built up.’ – ResMusica. © harmonia mundi
CD£7.99

Chamber Music - Released March 13, 2020 | haenssler CLASSIC

Booklet
HI-RES£14.99
CD£8.99

Chamber Music - Released February 21, 2020 | Prospero Classical

Hi-Res
HI-RES£14.99
CD£8.99

Chamber Music - Released February 14, 2020 | Groupe Analekta, Inc

Hi-Res
HI-RES£14.99
CD£8.99

Chamber Music - Released February 14, 2020 | Prospero Classical

Hi-Res
HI-RES£14.99
CD£8.99

Chamber Music - Released January 24, 2020 | Prospero Classical

Hi-Res
HI-RES£14.99
CD£8.99

Chamber Music - Released December 13, 2019 | Passacaille

Hi-Res Booklet
HI-RES£14.99
CD£11.49

Chamber Music - Released December 13, 2019 | Prospero Classical

Hi-Res
HI-RES£13.49
CD£9.49

Duets - Released November 15, 2019 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
This record is about reparation. History has not let two extraordinary composers meet each other. Georg Friedrich Haendel and Johann Sebastian Bach came to the world in 1785, one month apart. Twice, they failed to meet each other, and never again their life paths happened to come across, following parallel ways all along. This album is, thus, dedicated to this failure. Lina Tur Bonet and Dani Espasa offer here a record that reflects multiple questions, engaging a critical dialogue. If Bach and Haendel’s sonatas are facing each other, it is mostly their voices that echo to one another. By choosing these works, Lina Tur Bonet and Dani Espasa recreate, for an instant, the encounter of the two German composers, whose existences suddenly merge into one. This is the exact meaning of the matter of music, being able to suspend the time for a moment by giving birth to something that has never been before. Lina Tur Bonet and Dani Espasa prove to be true magicians in this recording, and much as their exceptional reinterpretation reveals the whole deepness and closeness that these works and their composers share. © Aparté
CD£17.99

Cello Solos - Released November 1, 2019 | Decca

Newly remastered from the original L’Oiseau Lyre tapes, a little-known Bach recording in the true French style. The modern phenomenon of the Cello Suites as a staple of any record collection may be laid at the feet of the Catalan cellist Pablo Casals, whose HMV recording, released in 1939, belatedly placed the set alongside The Well-Tempered Clavier and the solo violin works as a cornerstone of Bach’s instrumental output in the consciousness of listeners who could not play a note of his music. Another two decades elapsed before a new generation of cellists took up the mantle of Casals in the LP era. Among their select number was Jean-Max Clément, whose 1958 studio recording for L’Oiseau Lyre was released two years later. By then he had made a notable concerto appearance in London with Sir Thomas Beecham: ‘His tone was very small indeed,’ reported The Times, ‘but it was of such bachrare beauty and refinement that we could have listened to him all night.’ Like his contemporaries such as Fournier and Starker, Clément used a four-string cello to play the five-string Sixth Suite, and his portamento and rubato belong to Bach performance of a different era: not until Anner Bylsma’s 1979 recording would a historically informed set of the Cello Suites achieve wide circulation. However, the unostentatious elegance and refined taste of Clement’s playing offer rewards of their own, especially in repertoire that finds Bach at his most French in style. The original LPs have long been sought after and fetched exorbitant prices. This new Eloquence reissue sheds light on both the French cello school and on the ever-evolving nature of Bach interpretation. The booklet includes a new essay from Peter Quantrill, placing both the suites and the recording in context. (© Decca Music Group Limited / Universal Music Australia Pty Ltd.)
CD£15.98

Chamber Music - Released October 4, 2019 | Urania Records

HI-RES£19.79
CD£13.79

Cello Solos - Released September 6, 2019 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
The cello has always been favoured by French musicians, ever since its invention in the 1660s in Italy, where it gradually supplanted the viola da gamba. Two Parisians, the Duport brothers, wrote the first sonatas for the new instrument and published an Essai sur le doigté (Essay on Fingering) which laid the foundations of cello technique. It is still a touchstone work today. And so, the "French cello school" conquered the world, with, in the 20th Century, figures like Maurice Maréchal, Pierre Fournier, André Navarra, Paul Tortelier and Maurice Gendron: and today it is doing if possible even better, as many new talents hatch. An heir to this long line and herself a radiant and warm character, Emmanuelle Bertrand is passionate about all music: she worked on Tout un monde lointain with the composer (Dutilleux), and is inspiring and creating new works. For this recording, she has chosen a baroque cello, with gut strings, and a 415 Hz tuning. Here it is the instrument that sets the agenda, not the performer. She has discovered a new freedom in this approach to the pages that she has played, like all cellists, since her childhood. Matured over long years, her performance of Six Solo Cello Suites crystallises perfectly around this fine Venetian instrument of the early 18th Century. © François Hudry/Qobuz
HI-RES£14.99
CD£10.49

Duets - Released August 23, 2019 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
Whatever it takes, so long as it sounds remarkable. A viola da gamba composition played on a viola da braccia, or Bratsche in German. Such feats are commonplace for Antoine Tamestit, and here he overcomes the challenge with the same sense of indulgence that we have come to expect. In fact, the musician is an expert in adapting baroque classics. Tamestit transcribes compositions with tactfulness and intelligence, like in his two Suites for Solo Cello by Jean-Sébastien Bach. This time, the viola player is accompanied by his accomplice Masato Suzuki on harpsichord for the recording of the Three Sonatas for viola da gamba, BMV 1027-1029. Playing the music we like on an instrument we love, isn’t that what taking pleasure in music is about? There are incidentally several versions of the Sonata in G major, BMV 1027: a trio sonata of two transverse flutes and perhaps even an organ. So why not the viola? The record contains three scores in reverse order to their catalogue numbers. It’s a pleasure to hear the Vivace under the viola players agile fingers and ductile phrasing. The instrument’s grain is warmly transferred through his bow thanks to his natural approach to playing. The balance between the two musicians is a delight, particularly in the arrangement of the aria “Ergiesse dich reichlich” of the cantata Wo sol ich flihen hin, a pleasant surprise that is slipped in between sonatas BMV 1029 and 1028. The melody is fluidly transferred between the players and demonstrates the complexity of the composition’s exceptional contrasts. Of course, the viola provides a larger ambitus with seven strings and its ability to play deeper notes. Tamestit and Suzuki deliver here a disarmingly graceful rendition that lacks no gravity. © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
CD£10.79

Chamber Music - Released July 26, 2019 | Brilliant Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
A new recording of Bach’s final testament and love-letter to the art of counterpoint, performed in exemplary style by the Dutch harpsichordist. When he died in July 1750, Bach left tantalisingly unfinished his final masterpiece, The Art of Fugue. He had been composing and compiling it during the last decade of his life, alongside several other compendious projects such as the Mass in B minor and The Musical Offering, whose fugal masterpieces are excerpted on this recording. However, The Art of Fugue remains an absorbing testimony to Bach’s genius and to his life-long love and mastery of counterpoint. A single theme is elaborated with unprecedented variety over the course of 14 fugues and four canons. One of the fugues is composed for two harpsichords – where Belder is joined by Gerard de Wit – and composed in such a way that it can be performed backwards: an extraordinary feat of ingenuity. Playing both a modern copy of a Blanchet harpsichord and a clavichord modelled on a Friederici original, Belder intersperses canons within the sequence of fugues at strategic intervals. The recording set contains also the 4 Duetti BWV 802-805, and two Ricercares from the Musical Offering. © Brilliant Classics

Genre

Chamber Music in the magazine