Albums

£4.79

Vocal Jazz - Released March 9, 2019 | Red Bus Classics

£11.99

Vocal Jazz - Released April 17, 2019 | Mad Jazz records

£11.99

Vocal Jazz - Released March 13, 2019 | Mad Jazz records

£7.99

Vocal Jazz - Released May 1, 2019 | Mad Jazz records

£12.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2005 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
£5.99

Vocal Jazz - Released December 8, 2014 | My Favorite Things

£12.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | Verve

£12.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
£12.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2000 | Verve

Verve continues their Finest Hour series with Dinah Washington's Finest Hour, an 18-song collection highlighting the entire range of her repertoire, from blues to jazz to pop. "Evil Gal Blues," "What a Diff'rence a Day Made," "West Side Baby," "Trouble in Mind," and "Blue Gardenia" make this set an entertaining, if not comprehensive, overview of Washington's wonderful vocal gifts. ~ Heather Phares
£12.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Verve

£12.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1962 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
A torch song date recorded between Dinah Washington's commercial breakthrough in 1959 and her death in 1963, I Wanna Be Loved flaunts a large cast of talented collaborators -- plus, to be sure, Washington's regal readings of 12 great songs -- but, unfortunately, the musical side is overwhelmed by the heavy strings in attendance. Working with Quincy Jones, Washington found her studio cast to include Joe Newman and Clark Terry on trumpet, Jimmy Cleveland and Kai Winding on trombone, and Al Cohn on tenor. However, the arrangements (from Ernie Wilkins and Quincy Jones) rarely leave room for the musicians -- and, in fact, rarely feature them at all -- preferring instead to concentrate on strings and the occasional wordless vocal chorus. As usually happened in these circumstances, Washington appears unfazed by the treacle surrounding her; although she doesn't improvise, her performances of "Blue Gardenia," "Don't Explain," and the title track (originally an R&B hit for her 12 years earlier) are elegant and bewitching. The larger big band makes its presence felt on the two side-closers, both of them ("Let's Fall in Love," "Sometimes I'm Happy") more uptempo material. Although Washington's latter-day Mercury material is often derided, she always succeeded despite her surroundings, and this date is no different. ~ John Bush
£12.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | Verve

Part of Verve's Diva Series, this Dinah Washington collection serves as a solid introduction to her dynamic work. Featuring such popular Washington mainstays as "What a Diff'rence a Day Made," "If I Were a Bell," and "I'll Close My Eyes," this is a timely introduction to one of the jazz world's most versatile artists. While by no means definitive, at over 14 tracks one could do worse with a single-disc overview than to check this one out first. ~ Matt Collar
£12.49

Vocal Jazz - Released September 20, 1993 | Verve

Dinah Washington's Verve Jazz Masters, Vol. 19 may not be a definitive overview of her time at the label, but it's nevertheless a good 16-track sampler, containing excellent versions of such songs as "What a Difference a Day Makes," "Please Send Me Someone to Love," "Cold, Cold Heart," "This Can't Be Love," "A Foggy Day," "Pennies from Heaven," "Our Love is Here to Stay" and "Unforgettable." ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
£22.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | Universal Music

Dinah Washington's digital discography is riddled with compilations that brandish the word "Gold," as in "Golden Classics," "Golden Hits," "Golden Songs," "Golden Greats," "Golden Stars," and "Goldies." All that glitter, however, does not necessarily describe or guarantee well-produced collections. Happily, Verve's 2007 double-disc Washington anthology deserves its title, which simply consists of the word "Gold." Opening with her debut session (for Harry Lim's Keynote label on December 19, 1943) and following her progress across most of her 20-year recording career, this excellent chronological survey documents her triumphs as a rhythm & blues, jazz, and pop vocalist. The real jazz selections, in particular the nearly ten-minute take on "Lover Come Back to Me," demonstrate this gorgeous and powerful woman's "Don't Tread on Me" approach to music, love and life. Her formidable, somewhat volcanic interpretations of Bessie Smith's "Back Water Blues" and the torch song "All of Me" come from the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival. This historic episode can and should be enjoyed as a scene in the motion picture Jazz on a Summer's Day. Backed by the Terry Gibbs Sextet, Washington grabs a pair of percussion mallets and smilingly intrudes upon Gibbs' vibraphone solo during "All of Me," bumping him aside with a sway of her hips and demonstrating more than passing familiarity with the instrument (not altogether surprising since she originally appeared on the scene as vibe king Lionel Hampton's precocious upstart vocalist). The startling segue from the explosive climax of "All of Me" into the string-laden, chorally sweetened masterwork "What a Difference a Day Made" provides a healthy contrast that might tweak those who disparage such sugary production techniques. The lesson, of course, is that Washington sounded great under any circumstances. Furthermore, she consciously made the decision to record with strings as did Billie Holiday, Charlie Parker, Ben Webster, and Coleman Hawkins. Each of these artists used the chamber or orchestral format to achieve a number of personal goals that included dignity, delicacy, and of course, economic stability. Complaining about Washington's string section is as pointless as poking fun at her wigs, gowns or tiaras. One doesn't focus on Earl Hines' toupee -- one listens to the music he plays. Put aside all preconceptions and surrender your heart. Verve's Gold portrait of Washington is a superb tribute to a sublime artist beside whom a lot of other singers sound immature, insecure, insincere, or anemic. ~ arwulf arwulf
£12.49

Vocal Jazz - Released August 20, 1984 | Verve

£12.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2000 | Verve

£7.99

Vocal Jazz - Released September 29, 2017 | BDMUSIC

Booklet
£11.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1995 | Verve

"...If Benton wasn't quite Washington's equal--her extraordinary voice elevated even slight material--his resonant tones complemented her well..." - Rating: B+
£9.99

Vocal Jazz - Released June 25, 2005 | BDMUSIC

Booklet
£13.99

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2006 | Verve

Although a little slim at 45 minutes, Verve's compilation of 11 romantic titles recorded by Dinah Washington includes some of her finest material. Concentrating on the mid- to late '50s, Dinah Washington for Lovers surveys the years when she finally bloomed as a popular purveyor of adult vocal jazz. Surprisingly, it doesn't include the most popular ballad of her career, "What a Diff'rence a Day Made," but Washington had a certain way with standards that never fails to delight; no other vocal interpreter can make listeners contemplate lyrics anew even after they've heard it enough times to memorize. While most of the selections here feature the rosy strings and orchestra that Washington preferred late in her career, a pair of mellow ballads ("Darn That Dream" and "Crazy He Calls Me") come from a very different type of recording, her 1954 jam session landmark, Dinah Jams. ~ John Bush

Genre

Vocal Jazz in the magazine