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Classical - Released April 7, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released October 18, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Don't be fooled: this youthful face belongs to an 18 year old violinist with a wealth of knowledge and a tried-and-tested technique. For proof, just look at his Bach record, which came out before this Tchaikovsky Concerto, also on Deutsche Grammophon. With every new outing, Daniel Lozakovich surrounds himself with famous formations: for Bach, the Bavarian Radio Chamber Orchestra; for Tchaikovsky, the Russian National Philharmonic under Vladimir Spivakov (himself a great violinist who conducted his first recital in 2010). This gutsy concerto is addressed by a musician with an ample, sparkling sound, capable of an intense virtuosity and a very tender melancholy. Alongside Spivakov, who also recorded this score, he is quite at home. The hands-on sound recording seeks out the fullness of lyricism here, without robbing the strings of their bite. Note that the young soloist learned his scales under Eduard Wulfson in Karlsruhe. This student of giants like Henryk Szeryng, Nathan Milstein and Yehudi Menuhin (no less) taught his young disciple the violin of the Russian school. This young artist's voracious curiosity did the rest. And so, the second part of his programme here offers passages where pure melancholy has been distilled into music, as in Lensky's aria from Eugene Onegin, an opera that the violinist adores and knows by heart. His performance is inspired by previous interpretations by Fritz Wunderlich and Ivan Kozlovsky. And no-one could deny it: Daniel Lozakovich's violin sings! © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Classical - Released November 16, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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This new version of Tchaikovsky's famous ballet has been released hot on the heels of Disney's Nutcracker and the Four Realms, whose original music by James Newton Howard reprises and updates some of the themes from the Russian's score. Recorded by Gustavo Dudamel with Lang Lang at the piano and Andrea Bocelli singing the titles, this film's soundtrack is made to measure for these three global stars. This recording of the original material was carried out at the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles in December 2013 during a Christmas celebration. The concert marked ten years of fruitful collaboration between Gustavo Dudamel and the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra. The Venezuelan maestro brings us a hedonistic vision of this German fairytale by ETA Hoffman, re-imagined by Alexandre Dumas and so wonderfully turned in to music by Tchaikovsky. It was one of the Russian's last masterpieces, coming just before the "Pathétique" Symphony which would be his musical testament. But here, all is hardly fairytale and sugar thanks to an extraordinary melodic inspiration which is brought out by a light orchestration with unique timbres, like in the Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy which popularised the Celesta, an odd instrument invented in 1886 (an improbable lovechild of the glockenspiel and the piano that Tchaikovsky encountered in Paris). Dudamel is playing with dreams here. We are treated to a supple, refined conducting style that looks towards Vienna more than it does to St Petersburg, but it never loses sight of a childlike spirit that's sure to delight. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 1, 1996 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released July 31, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica
Tchaikovsky's final opera was the one-act lyric drama Iolanta, which was planned as a companion piece to the Nutcracker. However, the immensely popular ballet eclipsed it, and today the opera is rarely performed or recorded outside Russia. Yet this live concert performance on Deutsche Grammophon will certainly bring the work greater attention worldwide, thanks to the star power of Anna Netrebko, who has performed the role of the blind princess in Salzburg and Baden-Baden, making it a vehicle for her unique talents. She is joined by a strong Russian cast, which includes Sergei Skorokhodov as Count Vaudémont, Alexey Markov as Robert, and Vitalij Kowaljow as King René, and the orchestral support of Emmanuel Villaume and the Slovenian Philharmonic Orchestra lends the performance rich tone colors and fine details. While Netrebko's name recognition is the chief reason most western listeners will notice this recording, her singing provides the best reason to hear it. Netrebko's commitment to making this opera better known -- indeed, making it her own -- is reflected in her passionate performance, which is immediate and thrilling, and she imbues the music with intense emotion that is moving and memorable. The audio is exceptional, even by Deutsche Grammophon's high standards, so the orchestra's sonorities, dominated by woodwinds, are reproduced with vibrant sound. But above all, the audio gives Netrebko presence and warmth, so this is required listening for all of her fans and curious newcomers. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1986 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 1, 1979 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released September 22, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
After his exciting journey into the musical tradition of Eastern Europe (Journey East) and the Baroque sound-scapes of J.S. Bach (Bach), Nemanja Radulović now turns his attention to the Russian master of the Romantic era, Tchaikovsky, excelling as violinist and (in an arrangement of the famed Rococo-Variations for viola and string ensemble) a violist. For Nemanja Radulović a personal approach when creating an album is essential. Bringing together Tchaikovsky’s two most important works for solo strings and orchestra is bringing together the two of the most relevant poles of his life –  Belgrade and Paris: The Rococo Variations are linked to the first part of his life, when he was a student in Belgrade before the Balkan war. At this time Nemanja not only used to playing the violin, but also the viola and sometimes the cello. Playing an arranged viola version of the Rococo variations which originally were composed for cello takes him back to his musical childhood in Belgrade. Yvan Cassar, who worked with Nemanja on Journey East has now produced compelling arrangements for strings and piano of the Rococo Variations. They provide a lightness and an energy that are perfectly suited for Tchaikovsky’s music. The Rococo Variations were recorded in Belgrade with ensemble Double Sens (French for: “double direction” & “double meaning”). The group reflects perfectly Nemanja’s dual past between Paris and Belgrade as it includes his former student-friends from Serbia, and his friends from the Conservatoire de Paris (including 2 members of the Fontanarosa family). The Tchaikovsky concerto is linked to Nemanja’s arrival in Paris. He began to work on the concerto with his Conservatoire de Paris’ teacher Patrice Fontanarosa. Since then, this piece has been the concerto Nemanja has played most often during his career, opening the doors to the great concert halls of the world like in Paris, London or Tokyo. The concerto was recorded in Istanbul with the Borusan Istanbul Philharmonic Orchestra and Sascha Goetzel, with which Nemanja feels he finds the freedom to develop and express what is fundamentally important to him in the respective work.
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Classical - Released January 1, 1988 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 18, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
Violinist Daniel Lozakovich was already a veteran at 18, having made his debut at age nine and signed to Deutsche Grammophon at 15. It may seem that each year brings a prodigal new violinist, but Lozakovich, a charismatic soul who boxes on the side, bow hand be damned, is one of the best. His Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35, is muscular and unafraid of a little gravel in the tone. Sample his finale, a broad, arch-Russian thing where he is ideally backed by his mentor, Vladimir Spivakov, leading the new National Philharmonic Orchestra of Russia. Lozakovich grabs your attention from the start but never overplays the transitions. Really, though, there are a lot of good Tchaikovsky concertos out there, and the biggest news here is the diverse set of short Tchaikovsky pieces, the stuff of violin concerts a hundred years ago, most of which have passed through the hands of arrangers at some point. Done without full commitment, they're mawkish; done with the abandon of Lozakovich, they're delightful. They include the titular None but the Lonely Heart, from the Romances, Op. 6, arranged for violin and piano (the piano does tend to come out of nowhere) by Mischa Elman. It's all arch-Romantic material, played by a young violinist who gets it, and who promises great things. © TiVo
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Keyboard Concertos - Released January 1, 1989 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 1961 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released January 1, 1993 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 1987 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 1990 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 1977 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 1990 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 1997 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)