Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Classical - Released March 30, 2010 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année - Hi-Res Audio
Perhaps one of classical music's least noted but most important stories of the new millennium has been the profusion of recordings of Haydn's keyboard sonatas, each as different from the others as are the major schools of playing Beethoven, if not more so. Part of the reason for the variety is that, as French pianist Jean-Efflam Bavouzet points out here, Haydn's manuscripts contained very little in the way of interpretive markings, leaving the field open for future performers and editors. Bavouzet, operating in the sonically superb environment of Suffolk, England's Potton Hall and playing a modern Yamaha, nevertheless adopts the fruits of historical research in his approach. He takes the repeats and heavily ornaments them, without, however, drawing attention to himself in the process. More generally, his tone is clean, very quiet, and rather harpsichord-like. In the slow movements of these four middle-period sonatas he's low-key indeed, but his playing holds up under attentive listening; his playing successfully draws the listener into an intimate space. Bavouzet's readings generally have the sort of Haydn X factor that leaves the listener completely unsure of what's coming next. Strongly recommended and whets the appetite for other albums in the occasional series that Bavouzet promises is coming. © TiVo
HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Classical - Released April 2, 2013 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Pianiste Maestro - Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£14.99
CD£8.99

Classical - Released March 24, 2017 | Signum Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Award - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica
The Gabrieli Consort continue their series of award-winning collaborations with the National Forum of Music, Wrocław, Poland with a new recording of Haydn’s great oratorio The Seasons. Using a new performing edition by Paul McCreesh this recording is the first to feature the large orchestral forces that Haydn originally called for, including a string section of 60, 8 horns and a choir of 70. The disc features solo performances from British singers Carolyn Sampson, Jeremy Ovenden and Andrew Foster-Williams.
HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Classical - Released September 4, 2012 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£16.49
CD£10.99

Symphonies - Released April 21, 2015 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Choc de Classica
HI-RES£16.49
CD£10.99

Classical - Released August 19, 2016 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Solo Piano - Released July 6, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 étoiles de Classica
HI-RES£14.39
CD£9.59

Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Exceptional Sound Recording - Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£13.49
CD£9.49

Symphonic Music - Released September 29, 2017 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
HI-RES£17.99
CD£11.99

Sacred Oratorios - Released October 2, 2015 | Phi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
The entire creation of the world in an hour a quarter… it had to be through Haydn’s extraordinary powers of concentration that this insane wager could possibly succeed; others would not even dare attempt it. The Creation, dating from 1798, is one of the most ultimate and powerful of Haydn’s masterpieces. The great composer was always a master of surprise, and his invention of the Big Bang in musical form – including an introduction proclaiming ‘And then there was light’ – is chorally orchestrated to phenomenal effect. The work also retains a wonderful description of the various creations of the Lord; the extravagant evocation of whales remains an intense moment of orchestral invention, and the score is full of a genius which Beethoven had merely tapped into… Philippe Herreweghe has chosen to focus on a certain transparency of place, rather than perpetuating the traditional, bombastic dramatic gestures of orchestras within the German sphere. And, thus, the score gains greater clarity.
HI-RES£8.25£16.49(50%)
CD£5.50£10.99(50%)

Symphonic Music - Released November 10, 2017 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
Haydn2032, the ambitious project of recording the complete symphonies of Haydn, has been placed from the start under the artistic direction of Giovanni Antonini, with two ensembles, Il Giardino Armonico, which made the first four volumes, and the Kammerochester Basel, to which this fifth volume and the next two are assigned. Another characteristic of the edition is that each time Haydn is set in perspective with another composer; here it is Joseph Martin Kraus (1756-92): ‘Kraus was the first man of genius that I met. Why did he have to die? It is an irreparable loss for our art. The Symphony in C minor he wrote in Vienna specially for me is a work which will be considered a masterpiece in every century’, said Haydn in 1797. Though he long remained forgotten after his death, Kraus made an active contribution to the movement of poetic renewal called ‘Sturm und Drang’ or ‘Geniezeit’ (time of genius) because such artists as the young Goethe broke free of all tradition to follow their hearts alone. When Haydn called Kraus homme de génie, in French, he probably had this context in mind. The two composers had met in Vienna in 1783. © Alpha Classics
HI-RES£17.49
CD£12.49

Classical - Released February 5, 2016 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
HI-RES£13.49
CD£8.99

Classical - Released September 15, 2014 | ARTALINNA

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Still little known by music lovers, Japanese pianist Hiroaki Takenouchi has a boundless admiration for the works of Joseph Haydn, whose terrific inventiveness he has been analyzing for many years. For this first album on the Artalinna label, he proposes four sonatas that were composed in the early 1770s. They feature a dense, spirited, serene, and joyful Haydn that is consistently uncluttered. © Artalinna/Qobuz
HI-RES£14.39
CD£9.59

Classical - Released May 1, 2007 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
There is much to like in this group of Haydn orchestral pieces as rendered by the Netherlands Chamber Orchestra and its violinist-leader Gordan Nikolic. The varied program is one -- a symphony, for most of the stretch from Haydn's time to our own, was regarded as the culmination of a sequence of events that would also include shorter works and would display the talents of a variety of soloists, and the mixture of an overture, the Sinfonia Concertante in B flat major, Op. 84, and a late symphony is intelligent and effective. The rarely heard overture to the opera L'isola disabitata is another; the piece called forth from Haydn a slightly different outlook on orchestral-music structure than did the symphonic idiom. It's a colorful, fascinating little work that looks back to the three-movement Italian operatic sinfonia but, as usual with Haydn, gives it several interesting twists. Also noteworthy is the concluding performance of the Symphony No. 100 in G major, "Military." Nikolic plays up the prominent brass parts and the Turkish-influenced percussion that gave the work its nickname, and he manages, with contemporary instruments, to construct an interpretation that parallels Nikolaus Harnoncourt's vision of the symphony as a kind of early antiwar manifesto; the military elements, especially in the trio of the minuet, are made to appear as sharp intrusions that shatter a world of elegant calm. So what's not to like? The central Sinfonia Concertante. This superbly witty piece (if you're not suppressing laughter, you're missing the point) poses deep challenges for interpreters with its full-sized orchestral complement and quartet of soloists, each with a rich repertoire of satirical little jokes. Nikolic gets these jokes; his mock-recitatives in the finale, frivolous statements of an idea later exploited by Beethoven in the Symphony No. 9, are perfectly turned, and his tempos allow room for the music to breathe -- this is a situation in which it's best to take Haydn's Allegro marking in the opening movement as reflexive. But the balance is way off, and it's hard to tell whether it's the engineering or the conducting that went astray. The violin is drowned out in the quartet passages by the solo cello, and all the soloists are overwhelmed by the blaring brass and the full-bore strings of the orchestral tutti sections. The work seems to lurch from one section to another rather than take on the slowly deepening smirk it has in a really first-rate performance (the old Nonesuch LP by Karl Ristenpart and the Chamber Orchestra of the Saare is terrific). In spite of these problems, this disc is enjoyable and Haydn programmers can learn a lot from it. © TiVo
HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Classical - Released September 6, 2011 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Symphonic Music - Released November 1, 2000 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£14.39
CD£9.59

Classical - Released January 19, 2018 | L'Encelade

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Sacred Vocal Music - Released May 1, 2001 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Classical - Released March 1, 2013 | Sarastro

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES£11.99
CD£7.99

Sacred Vocal Music - Released May 1, 2002 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio