Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES£26.49
CD£18.99

Classical - Released September 4, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
To record the Golberg Variations, the absolute pinnacle of western works on harpsichord and the apotheosis of the Baroque era, is the ultimate dream for many musicians. Lang Lang, who admits to have studied the fourth section of the Clavierübung by the Cantor of Leipzig for over twenty years, is no exception. This collection offers two interpretations of the same work. Firstly, a studio version, captured beautifully at the Berlin Jesus-Christus Kirche in March 2020 under the supervision of Christopher Alder, in which Lang Lang displays more measured tempos, particularly in the the initial aria and the first variation. This approach begins to animate itself more in the next section before the first variation in G minor which is slow, sluggish-sounding and unrelenting, taking on a stubborn and repetitive saraband rhythm - a remarkable conclusion to the first section. The outburst of the French Ouverture of Variation 16 is nothing short of spectacular. The following variations pass quickly before the second variation in G minor (Var. 21, Conone alla Settima.), with its very depressive phrasing, an imaginary Tombeau which momentarily instills an impressive gravity. Lang Lang nevertheless remains indifferent to the intrinsic structure of the Goldberg Variations, organised into ten successive groups of three variations with each group finishing with an increasingly complex canon (from the Var. 3’s Canone all’Unisono to Var.27’s Canone all Nona). For the Chinese pianist, his expressive heart seems to concentrate on the three minor key variations, and he doesn’t hesitate to project a Baroque expressionism that finishes the Golbergs with a touch of pathos and romanticism alongside a rounded and silky sound.The energy of the Leipzig public, on the 5 of March 2020, adds a welcome characteristic. During the concert, recorded by Philip Krause, who also accompanied Alder during his studio recording, Lang Lang has fun with the polyphony, beginning with the Aria. Here, he dances and injects subtle variations into the accents, thus opening up a wider and more diverse field of expression (Var. 1, Var. 7). Mischievous (Variation 23 has 2 harpsichords!), Lang Lang lets his imagination run rampant and the emotion that ensues is truly striking (Var. 21, with its obsessive delays). A certain weight is lifted, even in the way the harpsichord sounds, which bears witness to how the Chinese pianist’s sound has changed over the last fifteen years. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
HI-RES£16.99
CD£12.49

Solo Piano - Released September 7, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
HI-RES£22.49
CD£15.99

Classical - Released April 10, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
It’s a strange feeling seeing Trevor Pinnock’s name again on the front of a Deutsche Grammaphon release, more than twenty years since the release of his numerous productions for the yellow label’s former sub-label dedicated to early and baroque music, Archiv Produktion – yet it’s also rather exciting. The artist produced the album himself with the help of renowned sound engineer and artistic director Philip Hobbs who has succeeded in capturing the beauty of his instrument built by David Way, modelled on an instrument by Henri Hemsch. This recording of Book I of J.S. Bach’s The Well-Tempered Clavier, recorded at the Colyer-Fergusson Hall at the University of Kent in August 2018 and January 2019, was a dream come true for the British harpsichordist as he admits in the touching introductory text, confessing his lifelong admiration for the dual character of the first book. For example, some diptychs have a completely educational, almost formalist character which is ideal for those learning the art of playing or composition, while others, such as the final Prelude and Fugue in B minor are revelatory of a greater ambition for composition and innovation, and even border on the abstract, and are therefore more difficult for novice musicians to grasp. Pinnock also notes that this music is essentially intended to be listened to and shared in small circles between family and pupils, for example. The intimate tone is indeed striking when listening to this interpretation for the first time. The harpsichordist had no hesitation in including all twenty-four preludes and fugues from the first book, unified in their ensemble by a certain lightness. Even within the robust framework, his playing exudes happiness, a sense of joie de vivre, even in keys that are usually more melancholic (Prelude and Fugue in E minor(), subdued (Prelude and Fugue in B flat minor, sombre (Prelude and Fugue in F minor) or uneasy (Prelude and Fugue in G sharp minor), throughout the two hours that this First Book lasts. An enthralling version not to be missed. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
HI-RES£19.49
CD£13.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1961 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
HI-RES£16.49
CD£11.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
HI-RES£19.49
CD£13.99

Classical - Released October 7, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Award - Gramophone Record of the Month - Le Choix de France Musique
HI-RES£16.49
CD£11.99

Classical - Released January 2, 1980 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
HI-RES£16.49
CD£11.99

Solo Piano - Released February 10, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica - Exceptional Sound Recording - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
HI-RES£18.99
CD£13.49

Classical - Released September 1, 1970 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res
HI-RES£16.49
CD£11.99

Violin Concertos - Released June 8, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
The press is already in a spin about it: "The new Menuhin"; "a star is born"; "the enchanted bow"... Daniel Lozakovich, 17 years old, might have his head in the stars, but he has his feet firmling on the ground. He is shaping a dazzling career with stunning maturity. Born in Sweden to a family from the former USSR, he learned violin in 2007, at the age of 6. Two years later, he would play his first concerto, conducted by Vladimir Spivakov. There then followed the difficult quest to find a teacher who would "not change my musicality, but make me stronger." Daniel Lozakovich currently lives in Geneva, where he works with Eduard Wulfson, a private tutor that he met at the Verbier Festival. It was also at this festival, which showcases young talents, that the teenager met Valery Gergiev, who immediately took him under his protective and liberating wing. Signed to Deutsche Grammophon (DG), Daniel Lozakovich would soon record Beethoven's Concerto in D Major with his mentor, "a work whose structure is so clear", he said, "but whose music is so difficult". Daniel Lozakovich listened to a lot of records to perfect his playing and his musical knowledge. He learned a lot from listening to the great masters of the past, in particular Bruno Walter, who charmed him with his sense of detail, and the sound he gets from his orchestra, as well as his poetic phrasing. This preference says a lot about this very young musician, who we discover here on his first record, dedicated to Bach. Listening to the Second Partita (with its brilliantly-structured Chaconne) and the Concertos in E Major and A Minor, we are won over straight away by the solidity of his concept, the great beauty of the sonority with its long phrases and a discourse which is constantly expressive. His parents, who are not remotely musicians, would have preferred for him to be a great tennis player, but fate had other plans for this strong-willed teenager with a dazzling smile. © François Hudry/Qobuz
HI-RES£22.99
CD£16.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
HI-RES£22.49
CD£15.99

Chamber Music - Released October 26, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 étoiles de Classica
During the course of a full career, which justly earned him the name of "prince of baroque violinists", Giuliano Carmignola developed a remarkable vision of Bach's works for solo violin. Carmignola, a student of Szeryng and Milstein, knows this repertoire inside and out, creating a feeling of spontaneity and improvisation while remaining closely faithful to Bach's writing. He uses a discreet but present vibrato beautifully (a far cry from some other baroque musicians who step much further back from the material), and he favours a free approach to rhythm and an expressive style that highlights all the colours and subtleties of Bach's phrasing. His playing is influenced by the historical techniques unearthed by modern musicology, but it is also profoundly original, lyrical, and moving. The three Sonatas and three Partitas date back to the 1720s, the era of the great instrumental masterworks known as the Brandeburg Concertos, the First Book of the Well-Tempered Clavier and the Cello Suites. The sonatas take the form of church sonatas – four movements, slow-fast-slow-fast – and the partitas borrow from the old-style dance suites in five, six or even eight movements. © SM/Qobuz
CD£13.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions Choc du Monde de la Musique - 9 de Classica-Répertoire
HI-RES£17.49
CD£12.49

Classical - Released August 26, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
HI-RES£3.99
CD£2.99

Classical - Released October 16, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res
CD£14.49

Classical - Released January 1, 1999 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

CD£17.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1985 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

HI-RES£24.99
CD£17.99

Classical - Released March 1, 1968 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
Recorded in 1967, in the rather dry acoustic environment of the Vevey theatre on the Swiss bank of Lake Geneva, this reference edition of Bach's Six Sonatas and Partitas by Henryk Szeryng benefited from the talents and the ears of the choral and orchestral conductor Vittorio Negri, who also spent several years as one of the Philips artistic directors. The two men were well-acquainted and shared a mutual respect. The duo would go on to produce other touchstone recordings for this label, which no longer exists today. With this recording, Szeryng laid down a kind of benchmark which remains an excellent approach to this demanding corpus. One could endlessly discuss the often-distant objectivity with which the violinist constructs his discourse, but we have to admire the clarity of his articulations and his serious, clear approach. Henryk Szeryng, who had already recorded the Sonatas and Partitas previously, in 1955, impresses with his style which can be severe, even haughty, and the power of his incredibly dynamic technique. This recording remains a superb testament to the performance of one of the great violinists of the 20th Century, before the advent of the "historically researched" school of baroque music, which has radically changed the approach to this repertoire. Today, violinists have a freer, less-corseted approach, closer to the folk dances which made their mark on Bach's music. © François Hudry/Qobuz
HI-RES£17.49
CD£12.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
Die Kunst der Fuge: what a way to make your Deutsche Grammophon solo recording debut. That's especially true if you're Pierre-Laurent Aimard, whose full-time gig is with Pierre Boulez's Ensemble InterContemporain and whose reputation was made in the avant-garde and not the late Baroque. This casting against type works in Aimard's favor. The intellectual cast of Bach's Art of the Fugue is perfect for a pianist who can play György Ligeti's etudes, and one would expect Aimard to deliver a reading of rare lucidity and crystalline virtuosity. But that he delves so deeply beneath the work's dense counterpoint to articulate the expressive art concealed by the music's technical brilliance is a pleasant surprise. Aimard's performances have not only the rigor of logic and rhetoric, they have the compulsion of drama. Recorded in translucent digital sound in the Mozart-Saal of Vienna's Konzerthaus, this recording deserves a wide audience, despite its apparent mismatch between performer and music. © TiVo
CD£12.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)