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Piano solo - Verschenen op 23 november 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik - 5 étoiles de Classica
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 8 oktober 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
Deutsche Grammophon's dramatic pairing of Sergey Rachmaninov's Piano Concerto No. 3 in D minor with Sergey Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No. 2 in G minor makes this CD a brilliant showcase for pianist Yuja Wang and maestro Gustavo Dudamel, two of the biggest sensations on the label. Wang previously released Rachmaninov's Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini and the Piano Concerto No. 2 with Claudio Abbado conducting the Mahler Chamber Orchestra, an ensemble that seemed nearly ideal for accompanying her delicate and often intimate style of playing. However, the usually robust sound of the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela is reined in somewhat on this recording of the Third, if not to be more subdued for Wang's playing, then perhaps to control the effect of Rachmaninov's thick orchestral writing. For whatever reason, Wang's playing is clear and generally well-balanced in the audio mix, though there is some artificial boosting of the volume. In terms of clarity and orchestral density, the Prokofiev Second is a different matter entirely, for the solo part is always audible, and the accompaniment is, for the most part, quite transparent. Wang is shown to better advantage here, and Dudamel has more options to work with, so this exciting performance really deserves top billing, despite the overwhelming popularity of the Rachmaninov work. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2011 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Onderscheidingen Choc de Classica - Uitzonderlijke Geluidsopnamen
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 17 april 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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There's nothing terribly new in John Adams' Must the Devil Have All the Good Tunes?, whose title the composer says he got from an old New Yorker article about Dorothy Day (it goes back to the world of Methodist hymnody in the 18th century), but the work is an excellent specimen of this composer's ability to appeal to a specific audience at a specific time, and it hits all the qualities that have made Adams such a favorite for so long. The work, commissioned by the Los Angeles Philharmonic and conductor Gustavo Dudamel, and premiered by the pianist here, the exuberant Yuja Wang, features motor rhythms, bits of popular influence, and a lyrical slow movement in which Adams says he was specifically influenced by Wang's sparkling style. The rhythms are goosed by an electric bass and a detuned "honky-tonk" piano, which aren't outwardly very apparent but make their presence felt; they are new and logical additions to Adams' arsenal. The result is a work that is a hell of a lot of fun, performed by probably its ideal interpreters, and what could be better than that? Other pianists are going to want a crack at this work. The online version of the album, released in the spring of 2020, ends with Adams' early China Gates, a lovely short work in the Steve Reich vein; a physical CD was delayed by the coronavirus epidemic but was promised for the future and is planned to contain additional pieces. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 8 april 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
Maurice Ravel's orchestral works are universally regarded as models of the art of orchestration, and this 4-CD box set from Deutsche Grammophon presents them complete, in stupendous live performances by Lionel Bringuier and the Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich. These recordings, made between 2014 and 2015, capture every aspect of Ravel's genius, from the colorful transcriptions of his piano pieces to works composed specifically for orchestra. While the ever-popular Boléro is a textbook example of how to use tone colors for a cumulative effect, such lavish pieces as the ballets Daphnis et Chloé and La Valse are sumptuous in their lush textures and vibrant sonorities. Bringuier is an enthusiastic advocate for Ravel's music, and his expertise is apparent in his meticulous interpretations and in the precision of the musicians, who play with rhythmic accuracy and polished execution. Featured soloists in these performances are the virtuoso pianist Yuja Wang, who is exciting in the Piano Concerto in G major and the Piano Concerto for the Left Hand in D major, and violinist Ray Chen, who delivers a compelling reading of Tzigane. In the remaining selections, the Tonhalle shines with brilliant luster, and Deutsche Grammophon's reproduction is first-rate, with its depth, detail, and dynamic range approaching audiophile quality. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 9 oktober 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
As a concerto soloist, Yuja Wang is best known for playing the Russian blockbusters of Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov, and Prokofiev, but this all-French album from Deutsche Grammophon reveals her talents in a different light. Maurice Ravel's Piano Concerto in G major and his Piano Concerto for the Left Hand in D major are among the most effervescent in the repertoire, and Wang sparkles with charm and energy, sometimes giving a feeling of being lighter than air when playing with the Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich, under the direction of Lionel Bringuier. Most of the magic may be in Ravel's carefully voiced scoring, which creates space around the piano and makes it completely audible, but Wang deserves credit for her controlled touch, seemingly effortless virtuosity, and elegant phrasing, which are always in evidence, even in the more frenetic passages. Gabriel Fauré's Ballade in F sharp major is a solo piano piece that provides a palate cleanser between the concertos, and here Wang offers an intimate reading that is both rich in sonorities and transparent in all its details. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 maart 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 21 september 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 31 mei 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2009 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 29 mei 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 8 april 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
Maurice Ravel's orchestral works are universally regarded as models of the art of orchestration, and this 4-CD box set from Deutsche Grammophon presents them complete, in stupendous live performances by Lionel Bringuier and the Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich. These recordings, made between 2014 and 2015, capture every aspect of Ravel's genius, from the colorful transcriptions of his piano pieces to works composed specifically for orchestra. While the ever-popular Boléro is a textbook example of how to use tone colors for a cumulative effect, such lavish pieces as the ballets Daphnis et Chloé and La Valse are sumptuous in their lush textures and vibrant sonorities. Bringuier is an enthusiastic advocate for Ravel's music, and his expertise is apparent in his meticulous interpretations and in the precision of the musicians, who play with rhythmic accuracy and polished execution. Featured soloists in these performances are the virtuoso pianist Yuja Wang, who is exciting in the Piano Concerto in G major and the Piano Concerto for the Left Hand in D major, and violinist Ray Chen, who delivers a compelling reading of Tzigane. In the remaining selections, the Tonhalle shines with brilliant luster, and Deutsche Grammophon's reproduction is first-rate, with its depth, detail, and dynamic range approaching audiophile quality. © TiVo
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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 14 januari 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
The 2013 British film Summer in February, about a love triangle among some artistic types in scenic Cornwall, was not terribly well reviewed. Its soundtrack, too, treads ground that will be very familiar to those who frequently attend lush art-house fare: big, romantic melodies, a few faintly recognizable vocal melodies with the vocals so processed that you wonder whether there's a human behind them at all, and a gauzy sheen covering the whole and blotting out any possible sharp edge. But composer Benjamin Wallfisch, who has written a good deal of this stuff, has come up with a novel twist this time: beginning with Chinese pianist Yuja Wang, he convinced top-level players, including his father, Raphael Wallfisch, to sign on to the performance. Now, the nameless musicians who labor in film-studio orchestras are probably among the more underrated figures in the music ecosystem, but Wang is one of the more exciting young pianists around, and you don't typically hear someone like her in this setting. She's the most prominent of the soloists, and the smoothness of her lines will add emotional impact for those ready to accept the assumptions of this kind of thing. The music was also beautifully recorded. Your reactions here will definitely depend on your general attitude toward the source material, but this is an above-average example. © James Manheim /TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 9 oktober 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
As a concerto soloist, Yuja Wang is best known for playing the Russian blockbusters of Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov, and Prokofiev, but this all-French album from Deutsche Grammophon reveals her talents in a different light. Maurice Ravel's Piano Concerto in G major and his Piano Concerto for the Left Hand in D major are among the most effervescent in the repertoire, and Wang sparkles with charm and energy, sometimes giving a feeling of being lighter than air when playing with the Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich, under the direction of Lionel Bringuier. Most of the magic may be in Ravel's carefully voiced scoring, which creates space around the piano and makes it completely audible, but Wang deserves credit for her controlled touch, seemingly effortless virtuosity, and elegant phrasing, which are always in evidence, even in the more frenetic passages. Gabriel Fauré's Ballade in F sharp major is a solo piano piece that provides a palate cleanser between the concertos, and here Wang offers an intimate reading that is both rich in sonorities and transparent in all its details. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 18 oktober 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 21 september 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 23 november 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 26 oktober 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 8 oktober 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
Deutsche Grammophon's dramatic pairing of Sergey Rachmaninov's Piano Concerto No. 3 in D minor with Sergey Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No. 2 in G minor makes this CD a brilliant showcase for pianist Yuja Wang and maestro Gustavo Dudamel, two of the biggest sensations on the label. Wang previously released Rachmaninov's Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini and the Piano Concerto No. 2 with Claudio Abbado conducting the Mahler Chamber Orchestra, an ensemble that seemed nearly ideal for accompanying her delicate and often intimate style of playing. However, the usually robust sound of the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela is reined in somewhat on this recording of the Third, if not to be more subdued for Wang's playing, then perhaps to control the effect of Rachmaninov's thick orchestral writing. For whatever reason, Wang's playing is clear and generally well-balanced in the audio mix, though there is some artificial boosting of the volume. In terms of clarity and orchestral density, the Prokofiev Second is a different matter entirely, for the solo part is always audible, and the accompaniment is, for the most part, quite transparent. Wang is shown to better advantage here, and Dudamel has more options to work with, so this exciting performance really deserves top billing, despite the overwhelming popularity of the Rachmaninov work. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 17 april 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

There's nothing terribly new in John Adams' Must the Devil Have All the Good Tunes?, whose title the composer says he got from an old New Yorker article about Dorothy Day (it goes back to the world of Methodist hymnody in the 18th century), but the work is an excellent specimen of this composer's ability to appeal to a specific audience at a specific time, and it hits all the qualities that have made Adams such a favorite for so long. The work, commissioned by the Los Angeles Philharmonic and conductor Gustavo Dudamel, and premiered by the pianist here, the exuberant Yuja Wang, features motor rhythms, bits of popular influence, and a lyrical slow movement in which Adams says he was specifically influenced by Wang's sparkling style. The rhythms are goosed by an electric bass and a detuned "honky-tonk" piano, which aren't outwardly very apparent but make their presence felt; they are new and logical additions to Adams' arsenal. The result is a work that is a hell of a lot of fun, performed by probably its ideal interpreters, and what could be better than that? Other pianists are going to want a crack at this work. The online version of the album, released in the spring of 2020, ends with Adams' early China Gates, a lovely short work in the Steve Reich vein; a physical CD was delayed by the coronavirus epidemic but was promised for the future and is planned to contain additional pieces. © TiVo

Artiest

Yuja Wang in het magazine