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Klassiek - Verschenen op 31 maart 2014 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
This cycle of Brahms' violin sonatas presents two of the more charismatic artists on the current scene, neither of them particularly known for Brahms. It works quite a bit better than you might expect. In a way pianist Yuja Wang is the star of the show. The Brahms sonatas still carry a trace of the violin sonata's origins with a violin accompanying the keyboard, and it is often the pianist who leads and sets the tone; in many movements Wang establishes a warmth and depth that are a bit out of character with her usual flamboyant style. She then plays nicely off of Kavakos' lyrical lines with her own more urgent style. The deeper logic of these works might be better served by a more neutral approach, but the overall impression is of two distinct personalities in conversation about the music, and that's the chamber music ideal. An added attraction is the presence of the scherzo from the early F-A-E Sonata, a work collaboratively written by Brahms, Schumann, and Albert Dietrich; Brahms' scherzo is a sort of essay in the Beethoven short-short-short long motif, and it allows Wang to really take command. An enjoyable outing that shows Wang, especially, developing talents beyond her comfort zone. Overly closely miked sound detracts from the experience. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 21 oktober 2013 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Hi-Res Audio
With his long hair and wild yet intellectual look, it's easy to see Greek violinist Leonidas Kavakos resembles Joseph Joachim, the dedicatee and premiere-giver of Johannes Brahms' Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 77. It's often been said that the Brahms work is not "for the violin" but "against the violin," and indeed its fascination resides in the way it bends the language of virtuoso display to Brahms' own compositional demands. It takes a superb talent to not only get through the notes but dominate the performance, and Kavakos does it. In the first movement he has a nifty way of dictating the transitions from the violin, and the numerous double stops and huge arpeggios with which the violin seems to try to escape the harmonic structure of the movement are invariably executed with élan. The finale sparkles with southern Europen vigor, and the venerable Gewandhaus Orchestra of Leipzig seems positively enlivened by the proceedings under the baton of Riccardo Chailly. If there's a complaint here, it's that the rest of the program does not live up to the Brahms concerto. The two Bartók Rhapsodies for violin and piano fit well enough with the four Brahms Hungarian Dances, in recital arrangements by Joachim himself, but not so well with the Brahms; the program seems to lurch from orchestral to chamber music, and from the Gewandhaus to the Berlin studio where the chamber pieces were recorded. For the Brahms concerto itself, however, the album is worth the money: the work would have filled an entire LP back in the day, and indeed Kavakos' commanding performance is reminiscent of some of the classics of that era. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 18 oktober 2019 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet
The violinist Leonidas Kavakos has many strings to his bow: an acclaimed soloist, he conducts orchestras – his first love – and is a chamber musician. This double album bears witness to the skills of this musical polymath who knows his Beethoven. He functions here both as soloist and conductor of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, which boasts over 60 musicians. In line with the practices of the composer's lifetime, this choice highlights the "egalitarian" style of the concerto's writing. While a virtuoso piece for sure, this score is more than just a pedestal for the soloist: the latter works closely with their peers, and shares every theme with them. Leonidas Kavakos gives a magisterial performance at the head of this impressive orchestra and brings forth some sumptuous nuances from the players, commanding their sustained and close attention. Heir to Viennese Classicism, Beethoven opened the way to the Concertos of Brahms or Sibelius, in which the solo violin often accompanies the orchestra with acrobatic embellishments. As agile as he was at the start of his career, the soloist doesn't perform Kreisler's famous cadence, but rather brings to life what Beethoven published for piano. This moment of complicity with the orchestra continues in camera in the Septet, Op. 20, the first score of the kind, in which the musicians sound like a small orchestra; and then finally in the 6 National Airs with Variations, Op. 105 for piano and flute (or violin ad libitum). Commissioned by a Scottish publisher when Beethoven was composing his Ninth Symphony, these miniatures for amateurs sound just as fresh as their dancing melodies. A very fine record which shows Beethoven in a less stormy light than usual. © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 19 juni 2020 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 31 juli 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 21 februari 2005 | ECM New Series

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 december 1999 | BIS

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 26 januari 2009 | Sony Classical

On the heels of his successful recording of the five Mozart violin concertos, violinist and conductor Leonidas Kavakos returns with the works of a composer with whom Mozart shared many life circumstances: Felix Mendelssohn. While Mendelssohn's contributions to the violin repertoire were far fewer in number, the influence of the E minor Concerto in particular cannot be understated. Emerging as one of the most important concertos of the Romantic era, the E minor Concerto is a part of nearly every violinist's repertoire. Kavakos, who also directs the Camerata Salzburg, does everything he can to leave his own print on the piece without resorting to absurd tactics. The outer movements are played with extreme fire and vehemence while remaining under precise technical control; Kavakos also likes to add unexpected pauses and delays in resolution both in his own part to spice things up a bit. Apart from this, however, nothing truly new is being said here. It is a well-executed, enjoyable performance that is absolutely appropriate for listeners who lack a recording in their libraries. It should be noted that the first disc in this set is a mere 28 minutes in length, not even half of the disc's capacity. Perhaps Kavakos could have included the lesser known but equally enjoyable D minor concerto. Disc 2 branches outside of the literature for solo violin and delves into chamber music; specifically, the two piano trios. Kavakos is joined by cellist Patrick Demenga and pianist Enrico Pace. Sound quality here is less clear and precise as it was in the concerto. This muddied quality makes it difficult to hear all of the intricate filigree taking place in the piano. Kavakos also seems to dominate his own part over his companions when all three play together. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 16 juni 2006 | Sony Classical

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Concertmuziek - Verschenen op 1 februari 1991 | BIS

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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 28 maart 2004 | BIS

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 1992 | Cameo Classics - Vox

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 13 oktober 2003 | ECM New Series

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 15 maart 1990 | Fazer Records - Finlandia

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 1994 | Dynamic

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 26 januari 2009 | Sony Classical

Booklet
On the heels of his successful recording of the five Mozart violin concertos, violinist and conductor Leonidas Kavakos returns with the works of a composer with whom Mozart shared many life circumstances: Felix Mendelssohn. While Mendelssohn's contributions to the violin repertoire were far fewer in number, the influence of the E minor Concerto in particular cannot be understated. Emerging as one of the most important concertos of the Romantic era, the E minor Concerto is a part of nearly every violinist's repertoire. Kavakos, who also directs the Camerata Salzburg, does everything he can to leave his own print on the piece without resorting to absurd tactics. The outer movements are played with extreme fire and vehemence while remaining under precise technical control; Kavakos also likes to add unexpected pauses and delays in resolution both in his own part to spice things up a bit. Apart from this, however, nothing truly new is being said here. It is a well-executed, enjoyable performance that is absolutely appropriate for listeners who lack a recording in their libraries. It should be noted that the first disc in this set is a mere 28 minutes in length, not even half of the disc's capacity. Perhaps Kavakos could have included the lesser known but equally enjoyable D minor concerto. Disc 2 branches outside of the literature for solo violin and delves into chamber music; specifically, the two piano trios. Kavakos is joined by cellist Patrick Demenga and pianist Enrico Pace. Sound quality here is less clear and precise as it was in the concerto. This muddied quality makes it difficult to hear all of the intricate filigree taking place in the piano. Kavakos also seems to dominate his own part over his companions when all three play together. © TiVo
From
CD€ 14,99

Klassiek - Verschenen op 31 maart 2014 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet
This cycle of Brahms' violin sonatas presents two of the more charismatic artists on the current scene, neither of them particularly known for Brahms. It works quite a bit better than you might expect. In a way pianist Yuja Wang is the star of the show. The Brahms sonatas still carry a trace of the violin sonata's origins with a violin accompanying the keyboard, and it is often the pianist who leads and sets the tone; in many movements Wang establishes a warmth and depth that are a bit out of character with her usual flamboyant style. She then plays nicely off of Kavakos' lyrical lines with her own more urgent style. The deeper logic of these works might be better served by a more neutral approach, but the overall impression is of two distinct personalities in conversation about the music, and that's the chamber music ideal. An added attraction is the presence of the scherzo from the early F-A-E Sonata, a work collaboratively written by Brahms, Schumann, and Albert Dietrich; Brahms' scherzo is a sort of essay in the Beethoven short-short-short long motif, and it allows Wang to really take command. An enjoyable outing that shows Wang, especially, developing talents beyond her comfort zone. Overly closely miked sound detracts from the experience. © TiVo
From
CD€ 14,99

Klassiek - Verschenen op 21 oktober 2013 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet
With his long hair and wild yet intellectual look, it's easy to see Greek violinist Leonidas Kavakos resembles Joseph Joachim, the dedicatee and premiere-giver of Johannes Brahms' Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 77. It's often been said that the Brahms work is not "for the violin" but "against the violin," and indeed its fascination resides in the way it bends the language of virtuoso display to Brahms' own compositional demands. It takes a superb talent to not only get through the notes but dominate the performance, and Kavakos does it. In the first movement he has a nifty way of dictating the transitions from the violin, and the numerous double stops and huge arpeggios with which the violin seems to try to escape the harmonic structure of the movement are invariably executed with élan. The finale sparkles with southern Europen vigor, and the venerable Gewandhaus Orchestra of Leipzig seems positively enlivened by the proceedings under the baton of Riccardo Chailly. If there's a complaint here, it's that the rest of the program does not live up to the Brahms concerto. The two Bartók Rhapsodies for violin and piano fit well enough with the four Brahms Hungarian Dances, in recital arrangements by Joachim himself, but not so well with the Brahms; the program seems to lurch from orchestral to chamber music, and from the Gewandhaus to the Berlin studio where the chamber pieces were recorded. For the Brahms concerto itself, however, the album is worth the money: the work would have filled an entire LP back in the day, and indeed Kavakos' commanding performance is reminiscent of some of the classics of that era. © TiVo
From
CD€ 14,99

Klassiek - Verschenen op 21 oktober 2013 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet
With his long hair and wild yet intellectual look, it's easy to see Greek violinist Leonidas Kavakos resembles Joseph Joachim, the dedicatee and premiere-giver of Johannes Brahms' Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 77. It's often been said that the Brahms work is not "for the violin" but "against the violin," and indeed its fascination resides in the way it bends the language of virtuoso display to Brahms' own compositional demands. It takes a superb talent to not only get through the notes but dominate the performance, and Kavakos does it. In the first movement he has a nifty way of dictating the transitions from the violin, and the numerous double stops and huge arpeggios with which the violin seems to try to escape the harmonic structure of the movement are invariably executed with élan. The finale sparkles with southern Europen vigor, and the venerable Gewandhaus Orchestra of Leipzig seems positively enlivened by the proceedings under the baton of Riccardo Chailly. If there's a complaint here, it's that the rest of the program does not live up to the Brahms concerto. The two Bartók Rhapsodies for violin and piano fit well enough with the four Brahms Hungarian Dances, in recital arrangements by Joachim himself, but not so well with the Brahms; the program seems to lurch from orchestral to chamber music, and from the Gewandhaus to the Berlin studio where the chamber pieces were recorded. For the Brahms concerto itself, however, the album is worth the money: the work would have filled an entire LP back in the day, and indeed Kavakos' commanding performance is reminiscent of some of the classics of that era. © TiVo