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Pop - Verschenen op 9 mei 2006 | Wicked Game - Reprise

In many ways, Chris Isaak is a perfect candidate for a "best-of" compilation: he has been consistent over the years, not only in the quality of his output but in his music, which hasn't strayed much from the sweetly moody retro-pop -- part Elvis, a large part Roy Orbison, a small part early Neil Diamond -- he essayed on his 1985 debut, Silvertone. As such, his records can be a little interchangeable, but even the bad ones are enjoyable, and when they're mixed and matched as they are here on his first-ever compilation, they hold together as well as if it were a proper album. Not that Best of Chris Isaak is exactly a "greatest-hits" -- he only had seven charting Billboard singles, and three of them aren't here; it's understandable that the 2004 Christmas tune "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town" isn't here, but 1989's "Don't Make Me Dream About You" and 1995's "Go Walking Down There," while not big hits, may be missed by some casual listeners, particularly since this is a generous 18-track compilation that finds space for such OK relative rarities as a cover of Cheap Trick's "I Want You to Want Me" and an acoustic version of "Forever Blue." But these are the kind of complaints that are found only if somebody is looking for flaws, since otherwise Best of Chris Isaak is an expertly chosen selection of his best easy-rolling, slyly sexy retro-pop, containing his four big hits ("Wicked Game," "Can't Do a Thing (To Stop Me)," "Somebody's Crying," "Baby Did a Bad Bad Thing") along with many of his best album tracks, like "San Francisco Days," "Two Hearts," "Speak of the Devil," "You Owe Me Some Kind of Love," and "Dancin'," among others. It's so well done and so comprehensive, it's easy to imagine that for many listeners -- particularly those who liked Isaak's style, whether musical or personal -- that this will be all the Chris Isaak they'll ever need. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 9 mei 2006 | Chris Isaak

In many ways, Chris Isaak is a perfect candidate for a "best-of" compilation: he has been consistent over the years, not only in the quality of his output but in his music, which hasn't strayed much from the sweetly moody retro-pop -- part Elvis, a large part Roy Orbison, a small part early Neil Diamond -- he essayed on his 1985 debut, Silvertone. As such, his records can be a little interchangeable, but even the bad ones are enjoyable, and when they're mixed and matched as they are here on his first-ever compilation, they hold together as well as if it were a proper album. Not that Best of Chris Isaak is exactly a "greatest-hits" -- he only had seven charting Billboard singles, and three of them aren't here; it's understandable that the 2004 Christmas tune "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town" isn't here, but 1989's "Don't Make Me Dream About You" and 1995's "Go Walking Down There," while not big hits, may be missed by some casual listeners, particularly since this is a generous 18-track compilation that finds space for such OK relative rarities as a cover of Cheap Trick's "I Want You to Want Me" and an acoustic version of "Forever Blue." But these are the kind of complaints that are found only if somebody is looking for flaws, since otherwise Best of Chris Isaak is an expertly chosen selection of his best easy-rolling, slyly sexy retro-pop, containing his four big hits ("Wicked Game," "Can't Do a Thing (To Stop Me)," "Somebody's Crying," "Baby Did a Bad Bad Thing") along with many of his best album tracks, like "San Francisco Days," "Two Hearts," "Speak of the Devil," "You Owe Me Some Kind of Love," and "Dancin'," among others. It's so well done and so comprehensive, it's easy to imagine that for many listeners -- particularly those who liked Isaak's style, whether musical or personal -- that this will be all the Chris Isaak they'll ever need. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 13 november 2015 | Concord

Hi-Res Booklet
Vintage-inspired singer/songwriter Chris Isaak has periodically attempted to update his '50s and '60s-influenced sound. Albums like 2002's Always Got Tonight and 2009's Mr. Lucky found the California native incorporating funk grooves, modern rock guitars, and the occasional synthesizer. Despite these moves toward contemporizing his pompadour-accented approach however, Isaak's best work, even on those albums, is always on the tracks where he embraces his old-school aesthetics and delivers melodic, twangy songs in his signature goosebump-inducing croon. This is the approach Isaak takes on his 13th studio album, 2015's First Comes the Night. Technically, the album is Isaak's first collection of all original music since Mr. Lucky, but stylistically, this record has more in common with his 2011 tribute to Sun Records, Beyond the Sun. As with that album, First Comes the Night has a vintage rock & roll vibe with songs that will play just as well to longtime Isaak fans as to listeners who only know him from his 1990 hit "Wicked Game." Recorded in Nashville, the album was produced by Paul Worley (Dixie Chicks, Lady Antebellum, Martina McBride), Dave Cobb (Jason Isbell, Sturgill Simpson, Shooter Jennings), and longtime Isaak associate Mark Needham. Despite its Nashville origin, First Comes the Night is not entirely a country album, though Isaak does touch on that sound here. Cuts like the yearning, piano-driven "The Way Things Really Are" and the bopping, darkly humorous "Down in Flames" sound like long lost Bob Luman hits. Primarily, however, the songs on this record are '50s and '60s-style pop tunes driven by Isaak's smoky vocal and devil-eyed lyrics. The title track is one of the most archetypical Isaak-sounding tracks he's recorded in years, recalling a mix of the Traveling Wilburys and the Righteous Brothers. Similarly, "Perfect Lover," with its rollicking rhythm and mariachi-esque horn section, finds Isaak paying tribute once again to Roy Orbison and Willie Nelson. There are also some surprises on First Comes the Night, including the Gypsy jazz-style "Baby What You Want Me to Do" and the circusy "Don't Break My Heart," which brings to mind the kitschy soundtrack to an Elvis movie. While First Comes the Night doesn't break any new stylistic ground for Isaak, it also doesn't hurt his reputation, and deftly reinforces his image as a glamorous, charming torchbearer for traditional pop songcraft. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 13 juni 1989 | Chris Isaak

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Lounge - Verschenen op 17 januari 2012 | Rhino

Sommige albums zijn zo vanzelfsprekend dat het een wonder heet dat ze nog niet eerder bestonden, en zo is het met Chris Isaaks Beyond the Sun, een eerbetoon aan het klassieke rock ‘n’ roll label, Sun Records. Sinds zijn eerste album, is Isaak de titanen die voor Sun opnamen enorm verschuldigd gebleven, met name Roy Orbison en Elvis Presley, wiens werken hier veelvuldig aan bod komen. Isaak houdt zich niet strikt aan nummers die op Sun zijn uitgekomen, maar hij blijft ook niet bij het voorspelbare, door geweldige nummers te vinden van namen als Warren Smith. Dit zijn geen herinterpretaties, maar oprechte eerbetonen – en ook al heeft dit misschien niet genoeg rand, het heeft genoeg stijl en hart. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2012 | Chris Isaak

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Rock - Verschenen op 23 mei 1995 | Chris Isaak

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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2012 | Chris Isaak

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Ambient / New Age / Easy Listening - Verschenen op 10 november 2017 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rock - Verschenen op 10 maart 1987 | Chris Isaak

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Rock - Verschenen op 11 december 2015 | Rhino

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Vintage-inspired singer/songwriter Chris Isaak has periodically attempted to update his '50s and '60s-influenced sound. Albums like 2002's Always Got Tonight and 2009's Mr. Lucky found the California native incorporating funk grooves, modern rock guitars, and the occasional synthesizer. Despite these moves toward contemporizing his pompadour-accented approach however, Isaak's best work, even on those albums, is always on the tracks where he embraces his old-school aesthetics and delivers melodic, twangy songs in his signature goosebump-inducing croon. This is the approach Isaak takes on his 13th studio album, 2015's First Comes the Night. Technically, the album is Isaak's first collection of all original music since Mr. Lucky, but stylistically, this record has more in common with his 2011 tribute to Sun Records, Beyond the Sun. As with that album, First Comes the Night has a vintage rock & roll vibe with songs that will play just as well to longtime Isaak fans as to listeners who only know him from his 1990 hit "Wicked Game." Recorded in Nashville, the album was produced by Paul Worley (Dixie Chicks, Lady Antebellum, Martina McBride), Dave Cobb (Jason Isbell, Sturgill Simpson, Shooter Jennings), and longtime Isaak associate Mark Needham. Despite its Nashville origin, First Comes the Night is not entirely a country album, though Isaak does touch on that sound here. Cuts like the yearning, piano-driven "The Way Things Really Are" and the bopping, darkly humorous "Down in Flames" sound like long lost Bob Luman hits. Primarily, however, the songs on this record are '50s and '60s-style pop tunes driven by Isaak's smoky vocal and devil-eyed lyrics. The title track is one of the most archetypical Isaak-sounding tracks he's recorded in years, recalling a mix of the Traveling Wilburys and the Righteous Brothers. Similarly, "Perfect Lover," with its rollicking rhythm and mariachi-esque horn section, finds Isaak paying tribute once again to Roy Orbison and Willie Nelson. There are also some surprises on First Comes the Night, including the Gypsy jazz-style "Baby What You Want Me to Do" and the circusy "Don't Break My Heart," which brings to mind the kitschy soundtrack to an Elvis movie. While First Comes the Night doesn't break any new stylistic ground for Isaak, it also doesn't hurt his reputation, and deftly reinforces his image as a glamorous, charming torchbearer for traditional pop songcraft. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 22 september 1998 | Chris Isaak

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Rock - Verschenen op 11 december 2015 | Rhino

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Vintage-inspired singer/songwriter Chris Isaak has periodically attempted to update his '50s and '60s-influenced sound. Albums like 2002's Always Got Tonight and 2009's Mr. Lucky found the California native incorporating funk grooves, modern rock guitars, and the occasional synthesizer. Despite these moves toward contemporizing his pompadour-accented approach however, Isaak's best work, even on those albums, is always on the tracks where he embraces his old-school aesthetics and delivers melodic, twangy songs in his signature goosebump-inducing croon. This is the approach Isaak takes on his 13th studio album, 2015's First Comes the Night. Technically, the album is Isaak's first collection of all original music since Mr. Lucky, but stylistically, this record has more in common with his 2011 tribute to Sun Records, Beyond the Sun. As with that album, First Comes the Night has a vintage rock & roll vibe with songs that will play just as well to longtime Isaak fans as to listeners who only know him from his 1990 hit "Wicked Game." Recorded in Nashville, the album was produced by Paul Worley (Dixie Chicks, Lady Antebellum, Martina McBride), Dave Cobb (Jason Isbell, Sturgill Simpson, Shooter Jennings), and longtime Isaak associate Mark Needham. Despite its Nashville origin, First Comes the Night is not entirely a country album, though Isaak does touch on that sound here. Cuts like the yearning, piano-driven "The Way Things Really Are" and the bopping, darkly humorous "Down in Flames" sound like long lost Bob Luman hits. Primarily, however, the songs on this record are '50s and '60s-style pop tunes driven by Isaak's smoky vocal and devil-eyed lyrics. The title track is one of the most archetypical Isaak-sounding tracks he's recorded in years, recalling a mix of the Traveling Wilburys and the Righteous Brothers. Similarly, "Perfect Lover," with its rollicking rhythm and mariachi-esque horn section, finds Isaak paying tribute once again to Roy Orbison and Willie Nelson. There are also some surprises on First Comes the Night, including the Gypsy jazz-style "Baby What You Want Me to Do" and the circusy "Don't Break My Heart," which brings to mind the kitschy soundtrack to an Elvis movie. While First Comes the Night doesn't break any new stylistic ground for Isaak, it also doesn't hurt his reputation, and deftly reinforces his image as a glamorous, charming torchbearer for traditional pop songcraft. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 10 januari 1985 | Chris Isaak

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Rock - Verschenen op 13 november 2015 | Concord

Hi-Res Booklet
Vintage-inspired singer/songwriter Chris Isaak has periodically attempted to update his '50s and '60s-influenced sound. Albums like 2002's Always Got Tonight and 2009's Mr. Lucky found the California native incorporating funk grooves, modern rock guitars, and the occasional synthesizer. Despite these moves toward contemporizing his pompadour-accented approach however, Isaak's best work, even on those albums, is always on the tracks where he embraces his old-school aesthetics and delivers melodic, twangy songs in his signature goosebump-inducing croon. This is the approach Isaak takes on his 13th studio album, 2015's First Comes the Night. Technically, the album is Isaak's first collection of all original music since Mr. Lucky, but stylistically, this record has more in common with his 2011 tribute to Sun Records, Beyond the Sun. As with that album, First Comes the Night has a vintage rock & roll vibe with songs that will play just as well to longtime Isaak fans as to listeners who only know him from his 1990 hit "Wicked Game." Recorded in Nashville, the album was produced by Paul Worley (Dixie Chicks, Lady Antebellum, Martina McBride), Dave Cobb (Jason Isbell, Sturgill Simpson, Shooter Jennings), and longtime Isaak associate Mark Needham. Despite its Nashville origin, First Comes the Night is not entirely a country album, though Isaak does touch on that sound here. Cuts like the yearning, piano-driven "The Way Things Really Are" and the bopping, darkly humorous "Down in Flames" sound like long lost Bob Luman hits. Primarily, however, the songs on this record are '50s and '60s-style pop tunes driven by Isaak's smoky vocal and devil-eyed lyrics. The title track is one of the most archetypical Isaak-sounding tracks he's recorded in years, recalling a mix of the Traveling Wilburys and the Righteous Brothers. Similarly, "Perfect Lover," with its rollicking rhythm and mariachi-esque horn section, finds Isaak paying tribute once again to Roy Orbison and Willie Nelson. There are also some surprises on First Comes the Night, including the Gypsy jazz-style "Baby What You Want Me to Do" and the circusy "Don't Break My Heart," which brings to mind the kitschy soundtrack to an Elvis movie. While First Comes the Night doesn't break any new stylistic ground for Isaak, it also doesn't hurt his reputation, and deftly reinforces his image as a glamorous, charming torchbearer for traditional pop songcraft. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 12 februari 2002 | Chris Isaak

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Rock - Verschenen op 24 februari 2009 | Chris Isaak

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Rock - Verschenen op 13 november 2015 | Concord

Vintage-inspired singer/songwriter Chris Isaak has periodically attempted to update his '50s and '60s-influenced sound. Albums like 2002's Always Got Tonight and 2009's Mr. Lucky found the California native incorporating funk grooves, modern rock guitars, and the occasional synthesizer. Despite these moves toward contemporizing his pompadour-accented approach however, Isaak's best work, even on those albums, is always on the tracks where he embraces his old-school aesthetics and delivers melodic, twangy songs in his signature goosebump-inducing croon. This is the approach Isaak takes on his 13th studio album, 2015's First Comes the Night. Technically, the album is Isaak's first collection of all original music since Mr. Lucky, but stylistically, this record has more in common with his 2011 tribute to Sun Records, Beyond the Sun. As with that album, First Comes the Night has a vintage rock & roll vibe with songs that will play just as well to longtime Isaak fans as to listeners who only know him from his 1990 hit "Wicked Game." Recorded in Nashville, the album was produced by Paul Worley (Dixie Chicks, Lady Antebellum, Martina McBride), Dave Cobb (Jason Isbell, Sturgill Simpson, Shooter Jennings), and longtime Isaak associate Mark Needham. Despite its Nashville origin, First Comes the Night is not entirely a country album, though Isaak does touch on that sound here. Cuts like the yearning, piano-driven "The Way Things Really Are" and the bopping, darkly humorous "Down in Flames" sound like long lost Bob Luman hits. Primarily, however, the songs on this record are '50s and '60s-style pop tunes driven by Isaak's smoky vocal and devil-eyed lyrics. The title track is one of the most archetypical Isaak-sounding tracks he's recorded in years, recalling a mix of the Traveling Wilburys and the Righteous Brothers. Similarly, "Perfect Lover," with its rollicking rhythm and mariachi-esque horn section, finds Isaak paying tribute once again to Roy Orbison and Willie Nelson. There are also some surprises on First Comes the Night, including the Gypsy jazz-style "Baby What You Want Me to Do" and the circusy "Don't Break My Heart," which brings to mind the kitschy soundtrack to an Elvis movie. While First Comes the Night doesn't break any new stylistic ground for Isaak, it also doesn't hurt his reputation, and deftly reinforces his image as a glamorous, charming torchbearer for traditional pop songcraft. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 15 juni 2010 | Chris Isaak

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Rock - Verschenen op 26 januari 2021 | SHOCKWAVES