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Alexander Melnikov - Dimitri Chostakovitch : Concertos pour piano - Sonate pour violon

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Dimitri Chostakovitch : Concertos pour piano - Sonate pour violon

Alexander Melnikov - Mahler Chamber Orchestra & Teodor Currentzis - Isabelle Faust

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Language available : english

The programming of this recording by Alexander Melnikov seems to be no accident. The two large, witty, outward-looking piano concertos surround the more grave, inward-facing Violin Sonata the way a sonata's or concerto's two fast movements surround a slow movement. It's also a real reflection of Melnikov as a performer, schooled in the Russian tradition and mentored by Richter (the pianist of the first public performance of the Violin Sonata), who is as comfortable as a soloist as he is as a collaborative pianist playing chamber music. In that regard, Melnikov and Faust make their parts of the sonata equal partners in the music, bringing out the smallest details. It is generally held that the sonata is about death, and these two handle it with intensity and seriousness, but do not make it grim or frightful. In the concertos, Melnikov and conductor Teodor Currentzis are also well matched. In the slow movements, especially of the Concerto No. 2, Melnikov's touch is so soft and phrasing so lyrical as to give the music a sweetness normally associated with a Rachmaninov or Ravel concerto, and Currentzis follows his lead. The animation in the fast movements, where Shostakovich likes to use rapidly repeated notes, is not pointedly sharp, but is impressive and extremely engaging nonetheless. The finale of Concerto No. 1, when everyone -- including the very precise trumpeter Jeroen Berwaerts -- gets going together is almost precipitously exciting. Yet it is Melnikov's sensitivity of touch that distinguishes his performance of these works from others'.
© TiVo

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Dimitri Chostakovitch : Concertos pour piano - Sonate pour violon

Alexander Melnikov

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Piano Concerto No. 2 Op. 102 in F Major (Dimitri Chostakovitch)

1
I. Allegro
00:07:10

Alexander Melnikov, Primary - Mahler Chamber Orchestra, Primary - Teodor Currentzis, Primary - Dmitri Shostakovich, Composer - Teodor Currentzis, Conductor - Mahler Chamber Orchestra, Orchestra

harmonia mundi France 2012

2
II. Andante
00:07:42

Alexander Melnikov, Primary - Mahler Chamber Orchestra, Primary - Teodor Currentzis, Primary - Dmitri Shostakovich, Composer - Teodor Currentzis, Conductor - Mahler Chamber Orchestra, Orchestra

harmonia mundi France 2012

3
III. Allegro
00:05:40

Alexander Melnikov, Primary - Mahler Chamber Orchestra, Primary - Teodor Currentzis, Primary - Dmitri Shostakovich, Composer - Teodor Currentzis, Conductor - Malher Chamber Orchestra, Orchestra

harmonia mundi France 2012

Sonata for violon and piano Op. 134 in F Major (Dimitri Chostakovitch)

4
I. Andante
00:10:32

Alexander Melnikov, Primary - Isabelle Faust, Primary - Dmitri Shostakovich, Composer

harmonia mundi France 2012

5
II. Allegretto
00:06:43

Alexander Melnikov, Primary - Isabelle Faust, Primary - Dmitri Shostakovich, Composer

harmonia mundi France 2012

6
III. Largo
00:13:59

Alexander Melnikov, Primary - Isabelle Faust, Primary - Dmitri Shostakovich, Composer

harmonia mundi France 2012

Concerto for Piano, Trumpet and String orchestra Op. 35 in C Minor (Dimitri Chostakovitch)

7
I. Allegro moderato
00:05:56

Alexander Melnikov, Primary - Jeroen Berwaerts, Primary - Teodor Currentzis, Primary - Mahler Chamber Orchestra, Primary - Dmitri Shostakovich, Composer - Teodor Currentzis, Conductor - Mahler Chamber Orchestra, Orchestra

harmonia mundi France 2012

8
II. Lento
00:08:30

Alexander Melnikov, Primary - Jeroen Berwaerts, Primary - Teodor Currentzis, Primary - Mahler Chamber Orchestra, Primary - Dmitri Shostakovich, Composer - Teodor Currentzis, Conductor - Mahler Chamber Orchestra, Orchestra

harmonia mundi France 2012

9
III. Moderato
00:01:27

Alexander Melnikov, Primary - Teodor Currentzis, Primary - Jeroen Berwaerts, Primary - Mahler Chamber Orchestra, Primary - Dmitri Shostakovich, Composer - Teodor Currentzis, Conductor - Mahler Chamber Orchestra, Orchestra

harmonia mundi France 2012

10
IV. Allegro con brio
00:06:25

Alexander Melnikov, Primary - Jeroen Berwaerts, Primary - Teodor Currentzis, Primary - Mahler Chamber Orchestra, Primary - Dmitri Shostakovich, Composer - Teodor Currentzis, Conductor - Mahler Chamber Orchestra, Orchestra

harmonia mundi France 2012

Album Description

The programming of this recording by Alexander Melnikov seems to be no accident. The two large, witty, outward-looking piano concertos surround the more grave, inward-facing Violin Sonata the way a sonata's or concerto's two fast movements surround a slow movement. It's also a real reflection of Melnikov as a performer, schooled in the Russian tradition and mentored by Richter (the pianist of the first public performance of the Violin Sonata), who is as comfortable as a soloist as he is as a collaborative pianist playing chamber music. In that regard, Melnikov and Faust make their parts of the sonata equal partners in the music, bringing out the smallest details. It is generally held that the sonata is about death, and these two handle it with intensity and seriousness, but do not make it grim or frightful. In the concertos, Melnikov and conductor Teodor Currentzis are also well matched. In the slow movements, especially of the Concerto No. 2, Melnikov's touch is so soft and phrasing so lyrical as to give the music a sweetness normally associated with a Rachmaninov or Ravel concerto, and Currentzis follows his lead. The animation in the fast movements, where Shostakovich likes to use rapidly repeated notes, is not pointedly sharp, but is impressive and extremely engaging nonetheless. The finale of Concerto No. 1, when everyone -- including the very precise trumpeter Jeroen Berwaerts -- gets going together is almost precipitously exciting. Yet it is Melnikov's sensitivity of touch that distinguishes his performance of these works from others'.
© TiVo

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