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Film Soundtracks - Released December 9, 2014 | RCA Victor - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released June 17, 2003 | RCA Victor

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released June 16, 2003 | RCA Victor

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Coming off a double Oscar win for his Breakfast at Tiffany's score, Henry Mancini produced this score for the Howard Hawks-directed, John Wayne-starring safari comedy. This is at first a fun blend of jazz and Afro-exotica, jungle drums mixed with a classic bop combo. Elsewhere, however, the soundtrack opts for some pleasant, but very Western jazz, only stopping for the African instrument-sampler "The Sounds of Hatari," which features some nice treated piano. The filmmakers were probably hoping that the Mercer and Carmichael song "Just for Tonight" would be as much a success as Tiffany's "Moon River," but if Hatari! is memorable for anything, it's for the incredibly goofy "Baby Elephant Walk," which has gone on to be infamous musical shorthand for kookiness of any stripe. Get this tune in your head and it sticks. © Ted Mills /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released December 9, 2014 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released June 19, 1989 | RCA Records Label

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1990 | RCA Victor

Distinctions Stereophile: Record To Die For
Henry Mancini was a significant writer for films who used the flavor of jazz in some of his movie scores. Mancini gathered an impressive cast of top players consisting of trumpeter Pete Candoli, trombonist Dick Nash, Ted Nash on alto and flute, Art Pepper (sticking exclusively to clarinet), baritonist Ronnie Lang, pianist Johnny Williams (doubling on harpsichord), guitarist Bob Bain, bassist Rolly Bundock, drummer Shelly Manne, Ramon Rivera on conga, and Larry Bunker on vibes and marimba. Some of the dozen selections are relatively straight-ahead, while a few (particularly "A Powdered Wig" and "Scandinavian Shuffle") are a bit corny, especially in their use of harpsichord and marimba. There are a few strong moments (particularly from Candoli and Pepper) on such numbers as "Moanin'," "Sidewalks of Cuba," "Castle Rock," and "Everybody Blow," but the end results are not too essential. Overall, this is a compromise between creative jazz and tightly controlled music meant for a larger audience. A historical curiosity. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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TV Series - Released December 9, 2014 | RCA Victor - Legacy

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Film Soundtracks - Released November 19, 1988 | Legacy Recordings

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Film Soundtracks - Released August 20, 1967 | Legacy Recordings

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 1, 1995 | RCA Camden

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Concord Records

Henry Mancini was easily one of the greatest composers for film soundtracks, so putting together a collection of 17 songs nominated for various awards (Grammy, Golden Globe, or Academy Awards) was easy. But finding the proper mix of musicians was important. His daughter, Monica Mancini, is a talented singer in her own right, so she was an obvious choice. And it was only natural to invite tenor saxophonist Plas Johnson to reprise his most famous solo in "The Pink Panther Theme," which he recorded with Mancini for the original soundtrack. For the most part, Mancini's arrangements are utilized, but there are some twists. Stevie Wonder is featured on harmonica with the vocal group Take 6 in the pretty ballad "Moon River," while organist Joey DeFrancesco shines in the breezy "Mr. Lucky." But it is Monica Mancini who makes the biggest impression (along with her father's music, of course). Her sensual rendition of "Moment to Moment," and her lightly swinging duet with singer Kenny Rankin of "Dreamsville," both of which are complemented by Tom Scott's superb alto sax, make it apparent that she inherited her father's musical genes. Among the several arrangements contributed by Patrick Williams, his gorgeous chart for Monica of "Dear Heart" features the singer backed mostly by George Doering's sensitive acoustic guitar. As Donald Fagen of Steely Dan puts it in his brief note to the CD: "All bow before the High Priest of Hollywood Cool!" In other words, fans of Henry Mancini should snap up this rewarding CD right away. © Ken Dryden /TiVo
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Pop - Released August 28, 2015 | RCA - Legacy

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 9, 2014 | RCA Victor - Legacy

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Pop - Released January 1, 1961 | RCA - Legacy

Mancini recasts some of the numbers he wrote for the popular CBS TV series Mr. Lucky in a Latin light vein. This 1961 release also features two of his best cuts in a circus-minded mix of harpsichord and trombone called "Rain Drops in Rio" and the noirish ballad "Blue Mantilla"; once again, Mancini strikes a fine balance between jazz atmospherics and lounge flourishes. And furthering his stock in after-hours slinkiness, Mancini goes widescreen on layered stunners like "Lujon" and "The Sound of Silver," while taking the conga line to over-the-top extremes on the glibly titled "Cow Bells and Coffee Beans." Topped off by stellar contributions from the likes of Brazilian guitarist Laurindo Almeida, pianist Jimmy Rowles, and drummer Shelly Manne, Mr. Lucky Goes Latin qualifies as yet another highly entertaining release from Mancini's early-'60s prime. © Stephen Cook /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released February 19, 2010 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1990 | Buddha Records

Remember how strikingly contemporary it seemed when Miami Vice used Phil Collins and Glenn Frey on its soundtrack, or years later when the producers of Gilmore Girls and The O.C. showcased young indie bands on their shows? Well, it was just that revolutionary in 1958 when Blake Edwards, producer of the otherwise fairly standard detective show Peter Gunn, tapped the young composer Henry Mancini to write a soundtrack informed by the West Coast-style cool jazz of Dave Brubeck and Chet Baker. The soundtrack album for Peter Gunn may be best known for the cool twang guitar riff of the main theme (later lifted wholesale by the B-52's for "Planet Claire," among others who recognized its forbidding cool), but this is his most jazz-influenced soundtrack work. There's some particularly impressive work by drummer Shelly Manne and vibes player Victor Feldman, whose cool, understated playing seems to deliberately recall that of Milt Jackson. © Rovi Staff /TiVo
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Pop - Released August 28, 2015 | RCA - Legacy

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 9, 2014 | RCA Victor - Legacy

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