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Pop - Released August 7, 2020 | Polydor Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 26, 2016 | Wolf Tone

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 5, 2014 | Wolf Tone

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 3, 2014 | Wolf Tone

On their full-length debut, Glass Animals recall more than a few of their contemporaries: Foals, Alt-J, and especially Wild Beasts spring to mind as touchstones for the band's lush yet challenging mix of indie and electronic sounds ("Hazey," meanwhile, suggests a collaboration between Massive Attack and Antony Hegarty). However, Zaba also shows what David Bayley and company bring to this style. Bayley, who produced the album, lavishes these songs with sonic details that are almost hallucinatory: the echoes that grace opening track "Flip" suggest a slow-motion reverie before the song locks into a louder, and arguably more predictable, rock groove, while "Pools" lives up to its name with its aquatic sound. All of Zaba is coated in dripping reverb that gives it a slippery feel that matches the effortless way Glass Animals slide between electric and electronic instrumentation. "Intruxx"'s looping beat sounds like a trip-hop rhythm translated into live percussion that sounds right at home next to "Wyrd"'s bubbly electronics. The band is often at its most fascinating when it conveys the chilled-out sophistication of dance music via rock, as on the low-slung groove of "Toes" or the rippling former single "Black Mambo," which makes the most of the jazzy androgyny of Bayley's vocals. An equally strange and sexy debut, Zaba's most audacious moments suggest Glass Animals will be an even more compelling act next time around. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Pop - Released August 11, 2020 | Polydor Records

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Pop - Released August 11, 2020 | Polydor Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 6, 2014 | Wolf Tone

On their full-length debut, Glass Animals recall more than a few of their contemporaries: Foals, Alt-J, and especially Wild Beasts spring to mind as touchstones for the band's lush yet challenging mix of indie and electronic sounds ("Hazey," meanwhile, suggests a collaboration between Massive Attack and Antony Hegarty). However, Zaba also shows what David Bayley and company bring to this style. Bayley, who produced the album, lavishes these songs with sonic details that are almost hallucinatory: the echoes that grace opening track "Flip" suggest a slow-motion reverie before the song locks into a louder, and arguably more predictable, rock groove, while "Pools" lives up to its name with its aquatic sound. All of Zaba is coated in dripping reverb that gives it a slippery feel that matches the effortless way Glass Animals slide between electric and electronic instrumentation. "Intruxx"'s looping beat sounds like a trip-hop rhythm translated into live percussion that sounds right at home next to "Wyrd"'s bubbly electronics. The band is often at its most fascinating when it conveys the chilled-out sophistication of dance music via rock, as on the low-slung groove of "Toes" or the rippling former single "Black Mambo," which makes the most of the jazzy androgyny of Bayley's vocals. An equally strange and sexy debut, Zaba's most audacious moments suggest Glass Animals will be an even more compelling act next time around. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Pop - Released February 19, 2020 | Polydor Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2014 | Wolf Tone

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2013 | Wolf Tone

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Pop - Released June 29, 2020 | Polydor Records

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Pop - Released November 13, 2019 | Polydor Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 28, 2012 | Kaya Kaya Records

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Pop - Released April 17, 2020 | Polydor Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 26, 2016 | Wolf Tone

After releasing their debut album ZABA, Glass Animals spent the better part of two years on tour, an experience that had a significant impact on their music. Not only did they translate ZABA's aloof ambient pop for ever-bigger audiences, the stories they heard from people they met on the road inspired How to Be a Human Being, a more ambitious, more engaged, and more engaging follow-up that makes a strong case for interacting with the world instead of hiding in a bedroom making beats. Written within weeks of finishing the tour, How to Be a Human Being sprung from an intensive creative process that involved imagining its characters, down to their favorite foods and hobbies, and recruiting photographer Neil Krug to bring its visuals to life. Despite this attention to detail, these character studies aren't especially literal. Only a handful of songs, like the wannabe-populated "The Other Side of Paradise," offer much in the way of narrative or world-building. Instead, Glass Animals focus on a very human mix of emotions, particularly on the album's bookends: "Life Itself"'s protagonist describes himself as "Northern Camden's own Flash Gordon," capturing the innocent swagger of starting out in a way that feels equally endearing and ridiculous, while "Agnes" records someone's final moments with bittersweet majesty. Though How to Be a Human Being' lyrics are more straightforward than ZABA's abstracts musings, Glass Animals' vivid music does more to convey their characters. They use their animated arrangements more purposefully than they did before, even though the rippling "Cane Shuga" feels like the bridge between this album and their debut. The different guises allow the band new nuances: "Take a Slice" and "Poplar St" are two of their sexiest songs, but the former exudes seductive femininity, the latter a masculine strut. Elsewhere, the R&B and hip-hop influences that percolated through ZABA finally bubble to the surface. "Pork Soda" plays like a distant cousin of Blackstreet's "No Diggity," while "Season 2, Episode 3," a love song to someone whiling her life away in front of the tube, is a mashup of R&B and chiptune that makes it one of the album's most adorably bittersweet moments. Indeed, despite its high-concept origins, the album doesn't take itself too seriously, and its vignettes are more cheerful than gritty: "Youth"'s tale of motherly nostalgia and loss is one of the album's most joyous-sounding songs. How to Be a Human Being's sense of wonder and joie de vivre feels as instructive to Glass Animals as their listeners, and their willingness to try anything results in some truly great moments. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 4, 2014 | Wolf Tone

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Pop - Released March 18, 2021 | Polydor Records

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Pop - Released August 7, 2020 | Polydor Records

With each album, Glass Animals' bright, ear-catching music has gotten more revealing and approachable. On 2014's ZABA, their bubbly mix of indie, electronic, R&B, and hip-hop influences sounded like pop from another planet, with abstract lyrics to match (who can forget "Gooey"'s "peanut butter vibes"?). They got a little more down-to-earth with the character studies of 2016's Mercury Prize-nominated How to Be a Human Being; now, on Dreamland, singer/songwriter Dave Bayley lets his listeners get even closer by studying his own character. It's a change that was years in the making: Bayley began writing more autobiographical songs with How to Be a Human Being's closing track, "Agnes," a tribute to a dear friend whose suicide affected him deeply. When Glass Animals' drummer Joe Seaward was seriously injured in a 2018 cycling accident, the band paused as he spent months learning how to talk, walk, and play music again. During this time, Bayley sharpened his songwriting and production skills by collaborating with Flume and 6LACK, and his growing experience -- as well as the emotions stirred by Seaward's healing process -- convinced him to dig into his own life and feelings for inspiration. His transformation into a more specific songwriter only makes Dreamland's music richer, grounding his band's genre-defying approach with his own chameleonic past. Before moving to England, Bayley spent his early adolescence in Texas and immersed himself in '90s American pop culture that pops up in unexpected ways on these songs. On "Space Ghost Coast to Coast," he juxtaposes cartoon imagery, the sound of 2000s hip-hop, and memories of a childhood friend who later attempted a school shooting. Once again, Bayley's fluency at melding R&B and hip-hop elements into Glass Animals' music makes it clear how deep his love for those genres is. The martial beat of "Your Love (Déjà Vu)" was inspired by Timbaland and the Neptunes as well as Beyoncé's Coachella performance, while "Tokyo Drifting," a low-slung collaboration with Denzel Curry, introduces Bayley's own Sasha Fierce, a character called Wavey Davey. Elsewhere, Dreamland is just as musically layered and engaging as ever, with plenty of wiggly synths and bouncy beats on tracks such as "Tangerine" and "Melon and the Coconut" and slinky sensuality on "Hot Sugar." Glass Animals' most cohesive and satisfying album to date, Dreamland is a well-deserved triumph that's as rewarding for fans to hear as it was for the band to make. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Pop - Released August 11, 2020 | Polydor Records

With each album, Glass Animals' bright, ear-catching music has gotten more revealing and approachable. On 2014's ZABA, their bubbly mix of indie, electronic, R&B, and hip-hop influences sounded like pop from another planet, with abstract lyrics to match (who can forget "Gooey"'s "peanut butter vibes"?). They got a little more down-to-earth with the character studies of 2016's Mercury Prize-nominated How to Be a Human Being; now, on Dreamland, singer/songwriter Dave Bayley lets his listeners get even closer by studying his own character. It's a change that was years in the making: Bayley began writing more autobiographical songs with How to Be a Human Being's closing track, "Agnes," a tribute to a dear friend whose suicide affected him deeply. When Glass Animals' drummer Joe Seaward was seriously injured in a 2018 cycling accident, the band paused as he spent months learning how to talk, walk, and play music again. During this time, Bayley sharpened his songwriting and production skills by collaborating with Flume and 6LACK, and his growing experience -- as well as the emotions stirred by Seaward's healing process -- convinced him to dig into his own life and feelings for inspiration. His transformation into a more specific songwriter only makes Dreamland's music richer, grounding his band's genre-defying approach with his own chameleonic past. Before moving to England, Bayley spent his early adolescence in Texas and immersed himself in '90s American pop culture that pops up in unexpected ways on these songs. On "Space Ghost Coast to Coast," he juxtaposes cartoon imagery, the sound of 2000s hip-hop, and memories of a childhood friend who later attempted a school shooting. Once again, Bayley's fluency at melding R&B and hip-hop elements into Glass Animals' music makes it clear how deep his love for those genres is. The martial beat of "Your Love (Déjà Vu)" was inspired by Timbaland and the Neptunes as well as Beyoncé's Coachella performance, while "Tokyo Drifting," a low-slung collaboration with Denzel Curry, introduces Bayley's own Sasha Fierce, a character called Wavey Davey. Elsewhere, Dreamland is just as musically layered and engaging as ever, with plenty of wiggly synths and bouncy beats on tracks such as "Tangerine" and "Melon and the Coconut" and slinky sensuality on "Hot Sugar." Glass Animals' most cohesive and satisfying album to date, Dreamland is a well-deserved triumph that's as rewarding for fans to hear as it was for the band to make. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2013 | Wolf Tone

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Glass Animals in the magazine