Thanks to the hard work carried out in cooperation with recording studios as well as an increasing number of music labels (Plus Loin Music, Bee Jazz, Ambronay Editions, Zig Zag Territoires, ECM, Mirare, Aeolus, Ondine, Winter & Winter, Laborie, etc.), Qobuz now offers a rapidly-growing selection of new releases and back catalogue records in 24-bit HD quality. These albums reproduce exactly the sound from the studio recording, and offer a more comfortable listening experience that exceeds the sound quality of a CD (typically \"reduced\" for mastering at 44.1kHz/16-bit). \"Qobuz HD\" files are DRM-free and are 100% compatible with both Mac and PC. Moving away from the MP3-focused approach that has evolved over recent years at the expense of sound quality, Qobuz provides the sound calibre expected by all music lovers, allowing them to enjoy both the convenience and quality of online music.

Note 24-bit HD albums sold by Qobuz are created by our labels directly. They are not re-encoded using SACD and we guarantee their direct source. In order to continue on this path, we prohibit any tampering with the product.

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R&B/Soul - Released March 21, 2018 | Epic - Legacy

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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R&B/Soul - Released September 29, 2017 | Epic - Legacy

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This trivial gimmick was released digitally in September 2017 and on CD and glow-in-the-dark vinyl the following month. Conceived by Sony's catalog label and Michael Jackson's estate, it draws from MJ's Epic catalog, dating back to the Jacksons' Triumph for "This Place Hotel" (1980) and working all the way up to the posthumous, barely dusty Xscape (2014) for its title track. The set is a conceptually muddled overview of Jackson's "most electrifying and danceable tracks" with the obvious intent to provide a one-stop Halloween party soundtrack. Some of the selections indeed deal in some level of horror and fantasy -- most obviously "Thriller," Rockwell's MJ-assisted "Somebody's Watching Me," the Jacksons' "Torture," "Dirty Diana," and "Blood on the Dance Floor." A greater portion is forced into the program, chosen for tenuous, superficial reasons, with real grief, anger, and frustration among the subject matter. Take the fiery, relevant-as-ever title track, which rails against injustice. Had it been titled "Stop Pressuring Me" instead, it might not have made the cut. Taken out of an opportunistic context, as simply a set of previously released Michael Jackson songs, Scream certainly is no substitute for any of the best studio albums or proper anthologies unavailable at seasonal strip-mall retailers. For completists, it offers one new track, a forgettable "mash-up." ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released November 4, 2016 | Epic - Legacy

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R&B - Released May 6, 2016 | Epic - Legacy

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Soul - Released January 1, 2016 | Epic - Legacy

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R&B/Soul - Released August 21, 2015 | Epic - Legacy

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R&B/Soul - Released August 21, 2015 | Epic - Legacy

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R&B/Soul - Released August 21, 2015 | Epic - Legacy

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R&B/Soul - Released August 21, 2015 | Epic - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
In a way, the Isley Brothers have been taken for granted. Part of that is the group's unwitting doing because they were exceptionally steady. From 1966 through 1983, the Isleys placed at least one single on the Billboard R&B chart each year. They were always present, frequently at or near the top. For an extended period, they were among the most progressive groups, whether they were mixing gospel, soul, and rock, incorporating synthesizers without sacrificing the funk, covering pop hits and often surpassing them, or epitomizing quiet storm. When they retreated from the fore, they adapted with ease. Another factor in their undervalued status is that their vast discography has been reissued in chunks by various sources across the decades. The RCA Victor & T-Neck Album Masters: 1959-1983, released by the Sony catalog's Legacy division, is a corrective measure in the form of a compact 23-disc box set. It doesn't cover the Isleys' brief '60s stints with Wand, United Artists, and Tamla, but it is remarkably generous with dozens of bonus tracks -- mono versions, single edits, instrumentals, and so forth -- and LP-replica sleeves for each album. As an extra enticement for those who dutifully rounded up those late-'90s Legacy and early-2010s BBR reissues, there's Wild in Woodstock, a previously unreleased recording of the Go All the Way-era band performing at Bearsville Studios. Intended for release with overdubbed crowd noise that was thankfully never applied, the set alternates between blistering and gliding and deserves a separate physical issue outside the box. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released March 6, 2015 | Epic - Legacy

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Soul - Released February 27, 2015 | Epic - Legacy

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In April 1965, the Staple Singers had not yet crossed over to the R&B charts, and were devoted gospel artists at a time when the African-American church was playing a major role in the civil rights movement. Just a month before, Dr. Martin Luther King's march from Selma to Montgomery had pushed violence against peaceful activists onto the nation's front pages and nightly news broadcasts, and made the battle for racial equality the key issue of the day. The Staple Singers had recently signed to Epic Records, and the label wanted to record a live performance by the Staples in their natural environment, Chicago's New Nazareth Church, where the family worshiped when not on the road. Producer Billy Sherrill set up recording equipment at the church, and the result was the album Freedom Highway, which not only captured the sound of the Staple Singers bringing forth the spirit for the Lord, but saw them debuting their song "Freedom Highway," in which they spoke in no uncertain term about the need for civil rights, the first of many songs in their repertoire that spoke of issues in the secular world as well as celebrating God and Jesus. Fifty years after Freedom Highway was recorded, Epic/Legacy have issued Freedom Highway Complete, which presents the April 9, 1965 performance by the Staple Singers in full, in a new mix that emphasizes the interaction between the artists and the spectators, as well as presenting the concert in full, unedited form. While there are some minor flaws in this thinking -- most notably including seven minutes of Rev. Hopkins taking collection and scolding the flock for not donating enough -- the result is a truly extraordinary document. At the opening, "Pops" Staples reminds the audience that they're at a worship service, not a concert, and should react as the spirit guides them, and the joy of the worshipers is genuine and enthusiastic, and it flows back through the Staples, who reveal why the were one of the leading gospel acts of the day as they stretch these songs into glorious testaments of belief. At the same time, you can also hear what set them apart -- "Pops" Staples' guitar work is brilliant, a spectral variation on country blues figures transformed into magic by his sure touch and a bit of reverb, and Mavis Staples, 25 years old at the time, was already singing with the force and authority that would make her a legend. Freedom Highway Complete is a deeply moving document of a handful of gifted artists guided by their talents, their spirits, and their consciences at a critical moment in American history, and it's one of the most important archival releases of recent years. ~ Mark Deming
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R&B - Released April 8, 2014 | Epic - Legacy

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R&B/Soul - Released September 14, 2012 | Epic - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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R&B/Soul - Released September 14, 2012 | Epic - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The downside to a success like Thriller is that it's nearly impossible to follow, but Michael Jackson approached Bad much the same way he approached Thriller -- take the basic formula of the predecessor, expand it slightly, and move it outward. This meant that he moved deeper into hard rock, deeper into schmaltzy adult contemporary, deeper into hard dance -- essentially taking each portion of Thriller to an extreme, while increasing the quotient of immaculate studiocraft. He wound up with a sleeker, slicker Thriller, which isn't a bad thing, but it's not a rousing success, either. For one thing, the material just isn't as good. Look at the singles: only three can stand alongside album tracks from its predecessor ("Bad," "The Way You Make Me Feel," "I Just Can't Stop Loving You"), another is simply OK ("Smooth Criminal"), with the other two showcasing Jackson at his worst (the saccharine "Man in the Mirror," the misogynistic "Dirty Diana"). Then, there are the album tracks themselves, something that virtually didn't exist on Thriller but bog down Bad not just because they're bad, but because they reveal that Jackson's state of the art is not hip. And they constitute a near-fatal dead spot on the record -- songs three through six, from "Speed Demon" to "Another Part of Me," a sequence that's utterly faceless, lacking memorable hooks and melodies, even when Stevie Wonder steps in for "Just Good Friends," relying on nothing but studiocraft. Part of the joy of Off the Wall and Thriller was that craft was enhanced with tremendous songs, performances, and fresh, vivacious beats. For this dreadful stretch, everything is mechanical, and while the album rebounds with songs that prove mechanical can be tolerable if delivered with hooks and panache, it still makes Bad feel like an artifact of its time instead a piece of music that transcends it. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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R&B/Soul - Released July 18, 2005 | Epic - Legacy

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R&B - Released February 3, 2004 | Epic - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The debut solo album from Luther Vandross featured one outstanding song after another. Vandross concocts a bouncy, vibrant flow on his up-tempo numbers and an intimate, emotional connection on his moderate grooves and his lone ballad. The title track stormed up the Billboard R&B charts to number one where it remained for two weeks. The mellow groove of "Don't You Know That," which checked in at number ten, was the second single. "Sugar and Spice" had less of an impact on the charts due to its short stay of six weeks. However, this feverish number gets all the juices flowing as does the unreleased "I've Been Working." Also featured on this set is the sentimental number "You Stopped Loving Me." The song was written by Vandross but initially released by Roberta Flack; both versions stand tall. "A House Is Not a Home" is the only ballad, and an elegant one it is, written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David and originally sung by Dionne Warwick nearly 20 years prior. Vandross orchestrates a contemporary masterpiece with this vintage number. Though it was never an official release by the label, it's a quiet storm jewel. In addition to his many music credits, Vandross was a featured guest vocalist with the progressive band Change. The same vocal savvy and smooth styling that the New York City native exhibited on songs like "Searching" and "Glow of Love" resurface here. This is one of the better R&B albums of the early '80s. ~ Craig Lytle
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R&B/Soul - Released October 16, 2001 | Epic - Legacy

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Despite the success of Bad, it was hard not to view it as a bit of a letdown, since it presented a cleaner, colder, calculated version of Thriller -- something that delivered what it should on the surface, but wound up offering less in the long run. So, it was time for a change-up, something even a superstar as huge as Michael Jackson realized, so he left Quincy Jones behind, hired Guy mastermind Teddy Riley as the main producer, and worked with a variety of other producers, arrangers, and writers, most notably Bruce Swedien and Bill Bottrell. The end result of this is a much sharper, harder, riskier album than Bad, one that has its eyes on the street, even if its heart gets middle-class soft on "Heal the World." The shift in direction and change of collaborators has liberated Jackson, and he's written a set of songs that is considerably stronger than Bad, often approaching the consistency of Off the Wall and Thriller. If it is hardly as effervescent or joyous as either of those records, chalk it up to his suffocating stardom, which results in a set of songs without much real emotional center, either in their substance or performance. But, there's a lot to be said for professional craftsmanship at its peak, and Dangerous has plenty of that, not just on such fine singles as "In the Closet," "Remember the Time," or the blistering "Jam," but on album tracks like "Why You Wanna Trip on Me." No, it's not perfect -- it has a terrible cover, a couple of slow spots, and suffers from CD-era ailments of the early '90s, such as its overly long running time and its deadening Q Sound production, which sounds like somebody forgot to take the Surround Sound button off. Even so, Dangerous captures Jackson at a near-peak, delivering an album that would have ruled the pop charts surely and smoothly if it had arrived just a year earlier. But it didn't -- it arrived along with grunge, which changed the rules of the game nearly as much as Thriller itself. Consequently, it's the rare multi-platinum, number one album that qualifies as a nearly forgotten, underappreciated record. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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R&B/Soul - Released August 21, 1983 | Epic - Legacy

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Compared to their past material, Between the Sheets lacks a consistent mix of sultry ballads and funky dance numbers. There are really only two Isley Brothers' classics on this project: "Choosey Lover" and the title song "Between the Sheets." The former has a romantic flow and the latter is just shy of mid-tempo but not a bona fide ballad. (When one thinks of a quiet thundering storm, this song's bassline comes to mind; as soothing as it is, it also has that trembling effect.) It fell short of number one, peaking at three on the Billboard R&B charts. It was becoming obvious that the group's continuity was fading -- not so much from dissension within the group, but more so from dwindling interest in the music industry among group members (it was the group's last album as 3 + 3). Marvin and Ernie Isley and their brother in-law Chris Jasper would release an album the following year as Isley Jasper Isley. ~ Craig Lytle
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R&B/Soul - Released August 21, 1982 | Epic - Legacy

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R&B/Soul - Released August 21, 1981 | Epic - Legacy

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