Thanks to the hard work carried out in cooperation with recording studios as well as an increasing number of music labels (Plus Loin Music, Bee Jazz, Ambronay Editions, Zig Zag Territoires, ECM, Mirare, Aeolus, Ondine, Winter & Winter, Laborie, etc.), Qobuz now offers a rapidly-growing selection of new releases and back catalogue records in 24-bit HD quality. These albums reproduce exactly the sound from the studio recording, and offer a more comfortable listening experience that exceeds the sound quality of a CD (typically \"reduced\" for mastering at 44.1kHz/16-bit). \"Qobuz HD\" files are DRM-free and are 100% compatible with both Mac and PC. Moving away from the MP3-focused approach that has evolved over recent years at the expense of sound quality, Qobuz provides the sound calibre expected by all music lovers, allowing them to enjoy both the convenience and quality of online music.

Note 24-bit HD albums sold by Qobuz are created by our labels directly. They are not re-encoded using SACD and we guarantee their direct source. In order to continue on this path, we prohibit any tampering with the product.

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R&B - Released October 12, 2018 | Columbia - Legacy

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R&B - Released September 28, 2018 | Columbia - Legacy

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R&B - Released September 7, 2018 | Columbia - Legacy

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R&B - Released November 4, 2016 | Columbia - Legacy

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The Spellbinders' sole LP, in the manner of many albums of the day, combined previously released 45s (both sides of their first three singles, from 1965 and 1966) with five additional tracks. It made for a reasonably strong mid-'60s soul album, not so much due to the group's vocal talents (which were certainly competent) as the robust production of Van McCoy, who also wrote four of the songs. One of those McCoy compositions was "For You," the group's only hit of sorts (reaching the R&B Top 30 in 1965). Take away the production, however, and the material isn't nearly as distinctive, as much of it's similar but inferior to bigger acts like the Temptations, the Impressions, and the Drifters (the resemblance to the last of those groups really coming to the forefront on "I Need Your Love"). Still, it's an enjoyable listen, and if it's not among the most memorable of obscure '60s pop-soul LPs, it's an above-average one for its category. All eleven of the tracks are included on the 2007 CD compilation Chain Reaction, which also adds historical liner notes and both sides of their two post-LP singles from 1966 and 1967. ~ Richie Unterberger
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R&B - Released September 30, 2016 | Columbia - Legacy

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R&B - Released July 8, 2016 | Columbia - Legacy

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R&B - Released July 8, 2016 | Columbia - Legacy

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Gerald Alston & the Manhattans -- Winnie "Blue" Lovett, Ernest Bivins and Kenny Kelly -- are mellow as Moet on this sophisticated soul showcase. Remakes of "Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye" and "Tomorrow" sound like originals; they stamped their imprint on the two pop classics so definitively you forget about other versions. The eloquent "Am I Losing You" is an understated and heart-rending ballad. The chugger "Movin'" is the only uptempo number, while "Everybody Has a Dream is a motivational piece. Alston sings like a Baptist preacher on the Dr. Martin Luther King-inspired message song. Despite Blue's depressing spoken intro, "Goodbye Is the Saddest Word" is not as depressing as the title or Blue's opening suggests -- it has a buoyant midtempo beat and a happy-go-lucky feel. ~ Andrew Hamilton
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R&B - Released July 8, 2016 | Columbia - Legacy

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Things changed considerably for the Manhattans in the early '70s. George "Smitty" Smith left the group and later died tragically. Gerald Alston replaced him and the group signed with Columbia. The title track of this album was their first huge hit with Columbia, and quickly showed them how much clout a smash on a major-label meant. The single reached number three on the R&B charts, almost made the pop Top 40, and ensured that Alston's smoother, but equally powerful and declarative voice wouldn't have any problem fitting into their new sound. ~ Ron Wynn
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R&B - Released July 1, 2016 | Columbia - Legacy

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Another addition to the Manhattans' bulging cache of mellow sounds. Gerald Alston, Winnie Lovett, Ernest Bivens and Kenny Kelly made a career of recording romance, heartache and make-out tunes. The popular "We Never Danced to a Love Song" fits in well with their other ballads, as does the majestic "It Just Can't Stay this Way" and "Let's Start All Over Again." They hit the charts with the somewhat contrived "I Kinda Miss You," and the title track, the eloquent "It Feels So Good to Be Loved So Bad" is classic -- the harmony is tight and they add a little doo wop for good measure. You can't go wrong with any Manhattan album; they give their fans what they want, and never do they offend or alienate them by recording and releasing something out of character. ~ Andrew Hamilton
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R&B - Released February 12, 2016 | Columbia - Legacy

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The finest Manhattan album in their second incarnation. The original group with George Smith had a slightly rougher, more traditional R&B/doo-wop sound, while the soul unit featuring Gerald Alston was smoother, but no less anthemic, especially on ballads. This album didn't make it as high on the pop charts as their self-titled '76 work, but had more consistently compelling tracks. "Shining Star" and "Girl Of My Dream" are masterful ballads. ~ Ron Wynn
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R&B - Released February 12, 2016 | Columbia - Legacy

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A good, although not classic or spectacular, early-'80s Manhattans album. The group dipped a bit from their 1980 peak, in part because the company chose to issue a greatest-hits album in 1980 rather than just ride out an internal situation and wait for a fresh release. They got two more chart hits out of the album, but never regained the momentum or status they enjoyed in 1980. ~ Ron Wynn
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R&B - Released February 12, 2016 | Columbia - Legacy

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R&B - Released February 12, 2016 | Columbia - Legacy

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Although this was a nice album, the Manhattans were beginning to encounter problems in the mid-'80s with Columbia. The hits were drying up, and although their harmonies and Alston's soothing leads were still first-rate, they had become a strictly R&B band, and weren't generating any pop attention. They tried being even smoother and more romantic than ever, softening the production and toning down the group interaction. The results were some excellent singles in "Just the Lonely Talking" and "Locked Up in Your Love," but they couldn't move the album or the group ahead. ~ Ron Wynn
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R&B - Released December 18, 2015 | Columbia - Legacy

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R&B - Released August 8, 2014 | Columbia - Legacy

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Funk - Released May 1, 2012 | Columbia - Legacy

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When it was originally released in 1978, The Best of Earth, Wind & Fire, Vol. 1 was a succinct, ten-track collection of the group's best and biggest singles up to that point. The excellent "September," a brand-new song, soon became a hit in its own right, and the non-LP Beatles cover "Got to Get You into My Life," recorded for the Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band film, also makes its first appearance on an EWF album here, as does the track "Love Music." EWF's commercial prime hadn't yet ended when this collection appeared; thus, it's missing several crucial latter-day hits, including the slinky funk of "Serpentine Fire," the ballad "After the Love Has Gone," and the disco smashes "Let's Groove" and "Boogie Wonderland." But even if it's an incomplete hits collection, The Best of Earth, Wind & Fire, Vol. 1 still ranks as a strong encapsulation of EWF the funk innovators. The singles gathered here constitute some of the richest, most sophisticated music the funk movement ever produced; when the absolute cream of the group's catalog is heard in such a concentrated fashion, the effect is dazzling. That's why The Best of Earth, Wind & Fire, Vol. 1 was remastered and reissued along with the rest of EWF's catalog, even though it's been supplanted by more extensive single-disc (Greatest Hits), double-disc (The Essential Earth, Wind & Fire), and triple-disc (The Eternal Dance) anthologies. 1998's Greatest Hits now stands as the definitive single-disc EWF overview, but for the budget-minded and the disco-phobic, this still makes for an excellent listen. ~ Steve Huey
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Soul - Released March 22, 2011 | Columbia - Legacy

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Soul - Released March 22, 2011 | Columbia - Legacy

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Since her youth Franklin had admired Dinah Washington, and it's a safe bet that the level of emotional commitment Washington brought to her work was a major influence on the blossoming style of Aretha, not to mention Washington's effortless sense of swing. Shortly before she died, Washington took appreciate notice of her acolyte as well. So Aretha's tribute to Washington is as logical as it is satisfying. Recorded when Aretha was just 21, UNFORGETTABLE is somewhat of a departure from her more R&B-oriented early work. However, the string arrangements of Johnny Mersey adn the jazzy bass work of George Duvivier mesh perfectly with Franklin's high-flying vocal fireworks. From the slow, subtle caress of "What a Difference a Day Made" to the organ-led blues of "Nobody Knows the Way I Feel This Morning," the young Aretha is in total command of the material here, simultaneously paying homage to and progressing from the influence of Washington.
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Soul - Released March 22, 2011 | Columbia - Legacy

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Soul - Released March 22, 2011 | Columbia - Legacy

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