Thanks to the hard work carried out in cooperation with recording studios as well as an increasing number of music labels (Plus Loin Music, Bee Jazz, Ambronay Editions, Zig Zag Territoires, ECM, Mirare, Aeolus, Ondine, Winter & Winter, Laborie, etc.), Qobuz now offers a rapidly-growing selection of new releases and back catalogue records in 24-bit HD quality. These albums reproduce exactly the sound from the studio recording, and offer a more comfortable listening experience that exceeds the sound quality of a CD (typically \"reduced\" for mastering at 44.1kHz/16-bit). \"Qobuz HD\" files are DRM-free and are 100% compatible with both Mac and PC. Moving away from the MP3-focused approach that has evolved over recent years at the expense of sound quality, Qobuz provides the sound calibre expected by all music lovers, allowing them to enjoy both the convenience and quality of online music.

Note 24-bit HD albums sold by Qobuz are created by our labels directly. They are not re-encoded using SACD and we guarantee their direct source. In order to continue on this path, we prohibit any tampering with the product.

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R&B - Released December 14, 2018 | Not specified

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R&B - Released October 26, 2018 | Def Jam Recordings. - Atlantic Recording Corporation

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R&B - Released October 26, 2018 | Def Jam Recordings. - Atlantic Recording Corporation

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R&B - Released September 14, 2018 | LVRN Records

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East Atlanta Love Letter is the sophomore album from American rapper 6LACK and follows his 2016 debut, FREE 6LACK. The deftly produced album, featuring minimal beats and rhythms, sees 6LACK lyrically influenced by his role as a father, juggling fame and the trappings that come with it. Guest spots come from the likes of Ty Dolla $ign, Offset, J. Cole, and Khalid. Upon release, the album debuted at number three on the Billboard 200. ~ Rich Wilson
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R&B - Released July 13, 2018 | Getting Out Our Dreams, Inc. - Def Jam Recordings

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K.T.S.E. is the sophomore album from American R&B artist Teyana Taylor and follows 2014's VII. Recorded at Kanye West's ranch with West on board as producer, the album sees Taylor melding new and contemporary R&B with classic soul, all with West's signature sound. ~ Rich Wilson
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R&B - Released June 23, 2018 | Getting Out Our Dreams Inc. (G.O.O.D.) Music - IDJ

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R&B - Released April 27, 2018 | Bearthday Music, LLC

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R&B - Released April 13, 2018 | RCA Records Label

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There was a point before the release of Joyride when the trajectory of Tinashe's music career appeared to be tracing that of Cassie. Tinashe had the platinum debut single with "2 On," a solid parent album, and waning momentum after relatively minor chart success with the follow-up singles. The situation worsened as the arrival of Joyride was delayed and a tour was consequently scrapped. By the time RCA matched Tinashe with labelmate Chris Brown for a non-album single in 2015 -- the year she planned to release Joyride -- it was evident that the singer and her label weren't on the same page. Two more years passed, during which Tinashe offered the stopgap commercial mixtape Nightride. A third and final version of Joyride was finally completed and released in April 2018. Remarkably, it bears no signs of a tough birth, even with the knowledge that the lead song -- the title track -- had been sold to Rihanna, unbeknown to Tinashe, who eventually bought it back. Sung in a lower register with a slightly devilish lilt, and further distinguished by Hit-Boy's slightly abrasive drums, "Joyride" simultaneously sounds like a fit for Rihanna and a striking way for Tinashe to begin her second proper album. The track ends with strings to neatly segue into the trap-styled "No Drama," where she takes a quick jab at those who have belittled her. It's one of two collaborations with Stargate, the lone full-track production holdovers from Aquarius. The other one, the bounding, bittersweet "Faded Love," features Future. Apart from the presence of those figures and some fleeting sourness, Tinashe keeps it moving with new studio support and another batch of compositions that cover romantic highs and lows. There are some missteps -- a tropical-flavored pop number that sounds a couple years late and easily forgettable, and the usage of grating bed-spring squeaks throughout the otherwise fine "Ooh La La." Nothing here is bound to pass "2 On" in terms of popularity, but the highlights are filled with rich details and seductive hooks, heard at full power on the slow jams "He Don't Want It" and "No Contest." The smoldering, slightly bluesy "Salt" and sweetly aching piano ballad "Fires and Flames" -- two additional highlights -- invalidate all claims that Tinashe is one-dimensional. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released April 13, 2018 | RCA Records Label

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There was a point before the release of Joyride when the trajectory of Tinashe's music career appeared to be tracing that of Cassie. Tinashe had the platinum debut single with "2 On," a solid parent album, and waning momentum after relatively minor chart success with the follow-up singles. The situation worsened as the arrival of Joyride was delayed and a tour was consequently scrapped. By the time RCA matched Tinashe with labelmate Chris Brown for a non-album single in 2015 -- the year she planned to release Joyride -- it was evident that the singer and her label weren't on the same page. Two more years passed, during which Tinashe offered the stopgap commercial mixtape Nightride. A third and final version of Joyride was finally completed and released in April 2018. Remarkably, it bears no signs of a tough birth, even with the knowledge that the lead song -- the title track -- had been sold to Rihanna, unbeknown to Tinashe, who eventually bought it back. Sung in a lower register with a slightly devilish lilt, and further distinguished by Hit-Boy's slightly abrasive drums, "Joyride" simultaneously sounds like a fit for Rihanna and a striking way for Tinashe to begin her second proper album. The track ends with strings to neatly segue into the trap-styled "No Drama," where she takes a quick jab at those who have belittled her. It's one of two collaborations with Stargate, the lone full-track production holdovers from Aquarius. The other one, the bounding, bittersweet "Faded Love," features Future. Apart from the presence of those figures and some fleeting sourness, Tinashe keeps it moving with new studio support and another batch of compositions that cover romantic highs and lows. There are some missteps -- a tropical-flavored pop number that sounds a couple years late and easily forgettable, and the usage of grating bed-spring squeaks throughout the otherwise fine "Ooh La La." Nothing here is bound to pass "2 On" in terms of popularity, but the highlights are filled with rich details and seductive hooks, heard at full power on the slow jams "He Don't Want It" and "No Contest." The smoldering, slightly bluesy "Salt" and sweetly aching piano ballad "Fires and Flames" -- two additional highlights -- invalidate all claims that Tinashe is one-dimensional. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released July 7, 2017 | Atlantic Records

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Soul - Released April 22, 2016 | Atlantic Records

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R&B - Released December 11, 2015 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released December 11, 2015 | RCA Records Label

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Robert Kelly remains driven as ever to take a metaphorical theme to a comedic extreme and then deviate from it in direct and explicit fashion. He does so from the start of The Buffet, an album released almost exactly two years after the thin Black Panties. In the voice-only "The Poem," he sets the tone -- make that table -- by announcing that he'll be "toasting your juices all night." If that doesn't get the point across, he makes a slurping sound, for five seconds, that could make Hannibal Lecter shudder. The following "Poetic Sex" involves a sweetened plea, "Baby, feed me," and a defiant punctuation of "My lyrics got a big dick and I just fucked the shit outta y'all." Anyone who has heard more than a handful of Kelly hits could accurately predict what a song titled "Marching Band" entails, and the pied piper comes through with what's easily the set's silliest and catchiest song. With recent R&B hits from younger peers increasingly blunt with lines like "eat the booty like groceries" and "so big it's like a foot is in your mouth," Kelly's form of lewd lyricism is decreasingly distinctive. He gets by here, as he always does, on his regenerative inventory of frisky melodies, and even teams up with some of the artists who have either headlined or assisted the more explicit end of pop-R&B. Jhené Aiko appears on the Aaliyah-jacking slow jam "Let's Make Some Noise," and though she was recorded in a studio far from Kelly's Chicago-based Chocolate Factory, the duet partners don't hesitate to make like they're beneath the sheets with one another. "Switch Up" likewise features a younger and vulgar R&B artist, Jeremih, who debuted six years earlier with the Kelly-lite "Birthday Sex," though the song is closer to Empire soundtrack filler. The Buffet does have more dimensions than Black Panties, including the enjoyable "Step in the Name of Love" rewrite "Backyard Party" and the throwback, Love Letter-styled "All My Fault." ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released December 11, 2015 | RCA Records Label

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Robert Kelly remains driven as ever to take a metaphorical theme to a comedic extreme and then deviate from it in direct and explicit fashion. He does so from the start of The Buffet, an album released almost exactly two years after the thin Black Panties. In the voice-only "The Poem," he sets the tone -- make that table -- by announcing that he'll be "toasting your juices all night." If that doesn't get the point across, he makes a slurping sound, for five seconds, that could make Hannibal Lecter shudder. The following "Poetic Sex" involves a sweetened plea, "Baby, feed me," and a defiant punctuation of "My lyrics got a big dick and I just fucked the shit outta y'all." Anyone who has heard more than a handful of Kelly hits could accurately predict what a song titled "Marching Band" entails, and the pied piper comes through with what's easily the set's silliest and catchiest song. With recent R&B hits from younger peers increasingly blunt with lines like "eat the booty like groceries" and "so big it's like a foot is in your mouth," Kelly's form of lewd lyricism is decreasingly distinctive. He gets by here, as he always does, on his regenerative inventory of frisky melodies, and even teams up with some of the artists who have either headlined or assisted the more explicit end of pop-R&B. Jhené Aiko appears on the Aaliyah-jacking slow jam "Let's Make Some Noise," and though she was recorded in a studio far from Kelly's Chicago-based Chocolate Factory, the duet partners don't hesitate to make like they're beneath the sheets with one another. "Switch Up" likewise features a younger and vulgar R&B artist, Jeremih, who debuted six years earlier with the Kelly-lite "Birthday Sex," though the song is closer to Empire soundtrack filler. The Buffet does have more dimensions than Black Panties, including the enjoyable "Step in the Name of Love" rewrite "Backyard Party" and the throwback, Love Letter-styled "All My Fault." ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released December 11, 2015 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released July 1, 2014 | Atlantic Records

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R&B - Released July 1, 2014 | Atlantic Records

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