Thanks to the hard work carried out in cooperation with recording studios as well as an increasing number of music labels (Plus Loin Music, Bee Jazz, Ambronay Editions, Zig Zag Territoires, ECM, Mirare, Aeolus, Ondine, Winter & Winter, Laborie, etc.), Qobuz now offers a rapidly-growing selection of new releases and back catalogue records in 24-bit HD quality. These albums reproduce exactly the sound from the studio recording, and offer a more comfortable listening experience that exceeds the sound quality of a CD (typically \"reduced\" for mastering at 44.1kHz/16-bit). \"Qobuz HD\" files are DRM-free and are 100% compatible with both Mac and PC. Moving away from the MP3-focused approach that has evolved over recent years at the expense of sound quality, Qobuz provides the sound calibre expected by all music lovers, allowing them to enjoy both the convenience and quality of online music.

Note 24-bit HD albums sold by Qobuz are created by our labels directly. They are not re-encoded using SACD and we guarantee their direct source. In order to continue on this path, we prohibit any tampering with the product.

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Disco - Released November 23, 2018 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
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Disco - Released November 23, 2018 | Rhino Atlantic

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Disco - Released November 23, 2018 | Rhino Atlantic

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Disco - Released November 23, 2018 | Rhino Atlantic

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Disco - Released November 14, 2018 | Rhino Atlantic

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R&B/Soul - Released September 29, 2017 | Epic - Legacy

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This trivial gimmick was released digitally in September 2017 and on CD and glow-in-the-dark vinyl the following month. Conceived by Sony's catalog label and Michael Jackson's estate, it draws from MJ's Epic catalog, dating back to the Jacksons' Triumph for "This Place Hotel" (1980) and working all the way up to the posthumous, barely dusty Xscape (2014) for its title track. The set is a conceptually muddled overview of Jackson's "most electrifying and danceable tracks" with the obvious intent to provide a one-stop Halloween party soundtrack. Some of the selections indeed deal in some level of horror and fantasy -- most obviously "Thriller," Rockwell's MJ-assisted "Somebody's Watching Me," the Jacksons' "Torture," "Dirty Diana," and "Blood on the Dance Floor." A greater portion is forced into the program, chosen for tenuous, superficial reasons, with real grief, anger, and frustration among the subject matter. Take the fiery, relevant-as-ever title track, which rails against injustice. Had it been titled "Stop Pressuring Me" instead, it might not have made the cut. Taken out of an opportunistic context, as simply a set of previously released Michael Jackson songs, Scream certainly is no substitute for any of the best studio albums or proper anthologies unavailable at seasonal strip-mall retailers. For completists, it offers one new track, a forgettable "mash-up." ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released June 17, 2016 | RCA Records Label

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When she positioned herself at the front of the British soul with her first album Sing To The Moon released in March 2013, Laura Mvula suspected that some form of pressure would follow. It is perhaps for this reason she took her time and waited three years before following up with this beautiful alloy of soul, R’N’B, gospel and jazz. In that time, she has gone through divorce as well as the passage into her thirties. With immense emotional pretext, The Dreaming Room is not a reflection of absolute serenity... But then again that's probably what has led the Birmingham singer to record this truly excellent sophomore attempt. Laura Mvula bears her soul quite literally – this is not jumpy and festive, but rather introspective - at times sounding like a modern gospel and even evoking thoughts of Julia Holter. A sense of gravity is evident as the song Phenomenal Woman demonstrates, with its title taken from a poem by Maya Angelou. The great American poet is also one of the main inspirations for this album that impresses especially when the LSO (London Symphony Orchestra) gets in on the act. Nile Rodgers of Chic and jazz guitarist John Scofield are also in support – a wonderful album from the soul singer. © MZ / Qobuz
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R&B - Released May 22, 1980 | UNI - MOTOWN

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R&B - Released January 14, 2016 | RCA Records Label

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R&B - Released March 20, 2015 | Warner Bros.

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Disco - Released August 3, 2006 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Disco - Released September 30, 2013 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
Released in 1978, just as disco began to peak, C'est Chic and its pair of dancefloor anthems, "Le Freak" and "I Want Your Love," put Chic at the top of that dizzying peak. The right album at the right time, C'est Chic is essentially a rehash of Chic, the group's so-so self-titled debut from a year earlier. That first album also boasted a pair of floor-filling anthems, "Dance Dance Dance" and "Everybody Dance," and, like C'est Chic, it filled itself out with a mix of disco and ballads. So, essentially, C'est Chic does everything its predecessor did, except it does so masterfully: each side similarly gets its timeless floor-filler ("Le Freak," "I Want Your Love"), quiet storm come-down ("Savoir Faire," "At Last I Am Free"), feel-good album track ("Happy Man," "Sometimes You Win"), and moody album capper ("Chic Cheer," [RoviLink="MC"]"[Funny] Bone"[/RoviLink]). Producers Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers were quite a savvy pair and knew that disco was as much a formula as anything. As evidenced here, they definitely had their fingers on the pulse of the moment, and used their perceptive touch to craft one of the few truly great disco albums. In fact, you could even argue that C'est Chic very well may be the definitive disco album. After all, countless artists scored dancefloor hits, but few could deliver an album this solid, and nearly as few could deliver one this epochal as well. C'est Chic embodies everything wonderful and excessive about disco at its pixilated peak. It's anything but subtle with its at-the-disco dancefloor mania and after-the-disco bedroom balladry, and Edwards and Rodgers are anything but whimsical with their disco-ballad-disco album sequencing and pseudo-jet-set Euro poshness. Chic would follow C'est Chic with "Good Times," the group's crowning achievement, but never again would Edwards and Rodgers assemble an album as perfectly calculated as C'est Chic. ~ Jason Birchmeier
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Disco - Released August 3, 2006 | Rhino Atlantic

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In 1981, a lot of rock & rollers were claiming that the disco era was officially over. Disco, of course, never really died -- a lot of the dance-pop, house music, Hi-NRG, and Latin freestyle that was recorded in the '80s and '90s was essentially disco -- but as far as many of the radio stations and record company A&R men of 1981 were concerned, disco was dead. And that was bad news for Chic, a group closely identified with the disco era. Even though a lot of Chic's work had as much to do with funk and soul as it did with the Euro-disco sound, Chic was unable to live down its reputation as a disco group. But Nile Rodgers and Bernard Edwards gave it a try with 1981's Take It Off, an admirable, if uneven, project that finds the group downplaying the Euro-disco elements. With R&B and funk as the foundation, Chic tries to branch out by incorporating elements of pop-rock on "Your Love Is Canceled," and jazz on "Flash Back" and "So Fine" (which shouldn't be confused with the "So Fine" that Kashif produced for R&B singer Howard Johnson in 1982). In fact, a few of Rogers' guitar solos give the impression that he'd been listening to a lot of Wes Montgomery. But as likable as the LP is, it didn't contain a major hit -- the single "Stage Fright" only made it to #34 on Billboard's R&B singles chart. And for a group that had enjoyed #1 pop and R&B smashes only two and three years earlier, that was certainly disappointing. ~ Alex Henderson
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Disco - Released February 8, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

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Disco - Released February 5, 2008 | Rhino Atlantic

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Disco - Released November 22, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

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If Prince and Shalamar -- two artists who made their recording debuts in the late '70s -- could be relevant to the urban contemporary scene of 1983 and even cross over to pop-rock/new wave audiences, why not Chic? Nile Rodgers and Bernard Edwards hoped that Chic could, which is why 1983's Believer finds the group updating its sound with generally appealing, if uneven, results. Using a lot more keyboards and drum machines and favoring a more high-tech production style, Rogers and Edwards sound like they're trying hard to live down their reputation as a late '70s disco act. Urban contemporary considerations are strong, and some of the songs might have reached pop-rock and new wave audiences with the right promotion. The infectious "Party Everybody" contains more rapping than singing, and acknowledges hip-hop's popularity, which is appropriate considering how often hip-hoppers have sampled Chic over the years. And even though Believer falls short of being a gem, you have to admire Chic's ability to update its approach while continuing to sound incredibly distinctive. But the LP didn't contain any hit singles, and Believer would be Chic's last album for Atlantic. Chic broke up in 1985, although they reunited for 1992's uneven Chic-ism and 1996's superb Live at the Budokhan (neither of which were big sellers). The ironic thing is that while Rodgers and Edwards were very much in demand as producers during the '80s (when Rodgers produced such superstars as Duran Duran, Madonna, David Bowie, and the B-52s, and Edwards worked with the Power Station, Rod Stewart, Robert Palmer, and Jody Watley, among others), Chic itself never returned to the top of the charts. ~ Alex Henderson
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Disco - Released January 28, 2014 | Rhino Atlantic

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This is a straightforward bundle -- a digital download release -- of Chic's eight studio albums for the Atlantic label. Chic (1977), C'est Chic (1978), Risqué (1979), Real People (1980), Take It Off (1981), Tongue in Chic (1982), Believer (1983), and Chic-Ism (1992) are combined in one set, sold at a price significantly less than the sum of the individual tracks. There are no bonus tracks -- just the albums straight up, as they were originally released. None of the band's fourth through eighth albums is essential; they have their moments, but only the most serious Chic fans will have any use for the whole deal. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B/Soul - Released November 13, 2007 | Epic

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R&B/Soul - Released November 17, 2003 | Epic

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R&B - Released October 27, 2003 | J Records

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