Your basket is empty

Categories :

Albums

From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Blues - To be released June 4, 2021 | Provogue Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$12.99

Blues - Released April 30, 2021 | Provogue Records

How Blue Can You Get collects a selection of unreleased material from the late Gary Moore's archives. Included are takes of Freddie King's "I'm Tore Down," Elmore James' "Done Somebody Wrong," and Memphis Slim's "Steppin' Out," alongside some of Moore's own material. © Rich Wilson /TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Blues - Released November 27, 2020 | Provogue Records

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Blues - Released August 28, 2020 | Provogue Records

Hi-Res
The life of a traveling blues musician isn't easy. The vocation is rife with loneliness, bad food, cheap hotels, and lack of sleep. Walter Trout is a survivor of that life (just barely). During the late 1960s and '70s, he worked the road with Big Mama Thorton, Joe Tex, and John Lee Hooker. In the 1980s, it was Canned Heat and John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers. He's led his own bands since 1990 and experienced cycles of triumph, tragedy, alcohol and narcotic addiction, and recovery from a near-fatal liver transplant that required two surgeries. Trout's dues are paid and then some. Ordinary Madness was produced by longtime collaborator Eric Corne and cut in analog at guitarist Robby Krieger's studio. Its many surprises reveal it to be unlike any other record in his large catalog. Its 11 songs detail with brutal honesty incidents of childhood and adult trauma, struggles with mental, emotional, and physical health issues, personal shortcomings, and more, all without grousing. The title track is introduced with ambient electronics before emerging a slow, intense guitar blues, appended by organ, electric piano, and rhythm section. Trout's harrowing lyrics portray a mind observing itself in an act of self-destruction, frustrated by its lack of control: "It feels like a stalker, that's always around/It's an interior talker, that's trying to take you down." His slow, screaming solo ratchets the intensity. "Wanna Dance" is a scorching hard rocker examining life on the edge, soothed by music and the motion it dictates. "Heartland" is a love song that weds electric and acoustic guitars to an intricate roots rock melody. The uncharacteristically tender "My Foolish Pride" unflinchingly reflects on Trout's failures with hard-earned wisdom and equanimity -- as well as the influence the '70s singer/songwriter era: "Ain't it hard/when you've got no one but yourself to blame." "The Sun Is Going Down" is singular in Trout's recording career. It's a slow, droning, desert-tinged blues, drenched in Hendrix-ian psychedelia. Trout borrows from the Delta blues in the opening line, "Stones in my passway...," before addressing the inevitable encounter with mortality in his own words, "And time has no mercy, it just don't seem to care," then cuts loose with the first of two blistering solos in overdrive. In "Make It Right," he employs funky Chicago blues and soulful vocals in trying to make amends with his beloved before the clock runs out. There is real anger and frustration in his solo, while the band pushes hard for more. Set closer "OK Boomer" is a perfect manifesto for Trout as a guitar slinger nearing 70. He turns the generational insult on its head with raucous, loud, dirty hard rock blues that's indebted to records by early Deep Purple and Led Zeppelin. On Ordinary Madness, Trout takes unprecedented chances with his legacy. His musical and lyrical depth reveal an overflowing abundance of restless creativity. This album is perfect for American audiences to finally embrace Trout as a blues icon; Europeans did that decades ago. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Blues - Released February 21, 2020 | Provogue Records

Hi-Res
Louisiana guitar slinger Sonny Landreth returns to the studio with his quartet two years after 2017's Grammy-nominated Recorded Live in Lafayette. Blacktop Run is more than just a new studio outing, however. Landreth reunites with producer R.S. Field for the first time since 2005's Grant Street. Field produced Landreth's three breakout sets for Zoo as well as several later albums. He is a studio empath and extends artists full faith and credit. Landreth possesses a distinct sound to be sure, direct, resonant, and simple, but he's restless when it comes to experimenting with styles. He juxtaposes, combines, and balances them with alarming regularity and reckless abandon. But he always anchors them into easily relatable grooves. He and the band recorded live to tape at Dockside Studios. Landreth's band includes keyboardist Steve Conn, drummer Brian Brignac, and bassist David Ranson. The guitarist wrote eight of these ten tunes; Conn penned the other two, which include the stellar instrumental "Beyond Borders," a jam that melds hard Southern swamp rock, electric slide blues, and Latin cumbia. The opening title track begins with fingerpicked National Steel guitar, a droning bassline, washboard, and bumping tom-toms. Landreth's singing voice at almost 70 years of age is better than ever: he glides through the lyrics, allowing his guitar to help carry them with his deft plectrum and slide-guitar picking, often in the same line. The tune is a rambling blues, infused with the energy of a pickup rolling down the open highway. "Lover Dance with Me" is a dirty Cajun blues instrumental with funky overtones. Landreth's scorching leads crisscross jazz, R&B, and garage rock on his way to blues while Ranson's bass growls with distorted passion in the backdrop propelling him forward. "Mule" is a Cajun stomper complete with button accordion; zydeco and Delta blues melt together on a honky tonk dancefloor. "Groovy Goddess" is a spiky instrumental showcasing Landreth's electric slide-playing swing. It has a hooky chorus line inserted to break up the pyrotechnics, but only holds them in check momentarily "Somebody Gotta Make a Move" is a cautionary tale with a reggae-cum-R&B backbeat injected into swamp blues. "Don’t Ask Me" brings the acoustic National Steel back to the fore in front of a shuffling drumkit and singing accordion. While "Many Worlds" commences as a slow-ish Americana tune, Landreth's nasty electric slide delves deep into shades of Southern blue. "Something Grand" is a country song written by Landreth. Accompanied by martial snares and a shimmering, soulful Hammond B-3, Landreth's fingerpicked acoustic frames a vulnerable lyric that amounts to narrative poetry. It argues the place for love: one that heals tragedy, ruin, and broken promises. It sends Blacktop Run out on notes of tenderness and mercy born of grit. Landreth and Field bring out the best in one another. They are symbiotic in their restless energies and experimental visions, and have consistently delivered excellence together; Blacktop Run is no exception. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Blues - Released February 14, 2020 | Provogue Records

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Blues - Released January 31, 2020 | Provogue Records

Hi-Res
In 2009, just over a year before his untimely death, the late, great Irish bluesman played an intimate set at London's Islington Academy which has since gone down in legend among his fans. Recorded for posterity, it appeared in January 2020. Featuring Moore at the top of his game, it includes some of his best-loved tunes including "Since I Met You Baby," "I Love You More Than You'll Ever Know," "Walking by Myself," and the classic "Parisienne Walkways." © John D. Buchanan /TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Blues - Released August 23, 2019 | Provogue Records

Hi-Res
After emerging from the sacred pedal steel tradition in the African-American Pentecostal church, Robert Randolph has expanded the sonic possibilities of his instrument. Under Randolph's fingers, the pedal steel roars as the star of his fiery live shows, exploding the common perception that its best use was adding atmosphere behind country music weepers. After eight albums Randolph has settled into a forceful soul-gospel-blues-groove which he continues to enrich and explore with each new record. In this collaboration, recorded by skilled Nashville producer Dave Cobb (who also played guitar and co-wrote five of the album's tunes), Randolph mixes things up with a cover of the Pops Staples' "Simple Man," and on the funky, Meters-like "Second Hand Man." "Cut Em Loose" is a powerful hard rock number led by the kind of buzzsaw tone that won the jam band audience over to his cause years ago. The musical intensity increases on "Living Off the Love You Give," with Randolph letting loose on fierce, razor-like lead lines. Brighter Days closes with "Strange Train," another driving, jumpy, R&B-drenched dance tune where Randolph shows again why he is the pedal steel guitar's leading virtuoso. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
From
CD$12.99

Blues - Released August 23, 2019 | Provogue Records

Robert Randolph, after emerging from the sacred pedal steel tradition in the African-American Pentecostal church, has expanded the sonic possibilities of his instrument. Under Randolph's fingers, the pedal steel roars the star of his fiery live shows, exploding the common perception that its best use is adding atmosphere behind country music weepers. After eight albums Randolph has settled into a forceful soul-gospel-blues-groove which he continues to enrich and explore with each new record. In this collaboration, recorded by skilled Nashville producer Dave Cobb, Randolph mixes things up with a cover of the Staples pops' "Simple Man," and on the funky, Meters -like "Second Hand Man." "Cut Em Loose" is a powerful hard rock band by the kind of buzzsaw The musical intensity increases on "Live Off the Love You Give," with Randolph letting loose on fierce, razor-like lead lines.Brighter Days closed with "Strange Train," another driving, jumpy, R & B-drenched dance tune where Randolph shows up again. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Blues - Released July 12, 2019 | Provogue Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$12.99

Blues - Released July 12, 2019 | Provogue Records

From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$15.49

Blues - Released June 28, 2019 | Provogue Records

Hi-Res
This might seem obvious, but jam bands tend to make pretty good live albums. So when Gov’t Mule decided they’d celebrate their 25 years of existence by releasing Bring On The Music: Live at The Capitol Theatre, a 4 disc set with over 5 hours of music, we rejoiced. The performances were recorded in 2018, and they are loyal to Haynes’ multi-genre brand of music. Drawing from the best of over 300 songs, Danny Louis (keys, backing vocals), Andy Hess (bass) and Matt Abts (drums) are top-notch improvisers. But this is never at the cost of energetic performances. That’s where many jam bands fall short: they sacrifice dynamics and coherence for 10-minute pentatonic solos. Gov’t Mule isn’t one of those bands! The rhythm section is tight – synergy is the priority behind every musical choice. On Trane/Eternity’s Breath/ St Stephen, the communication between Hess and Abts is just phenomenal. They transition with ease between prog and jazz, jazz and blues. Revolution Come, Revolution Go also shows how much the quartet can groove. Their improv is always built on the steady foundations of Haynes’ writing. From that starting point, they are given free reign to play on which ever style they please. Bring On The Music: Live at The Capitol is the crowning jewel to a long and successful career. © Alexis Renaudat/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$15.49

Blues - Released June 28, 2019 | Provogue Records

Hi-Res
This might seem obvious, but jam bands tend to make pretty good live albums. So when Gov’t Mule decided they’d celebrate their 25 years of existence by releasing Bring On The Music: Live at The Capitol Theatre, a 4 disc set with over 5 hours of music, we rejoiced. The performances were recorded in 2018, and they are loyal to Haynes’ multi-genre brand of music. Drawing from the best of over 300 songs, Danny Louis (keys, backing vocals), Andy Hess (bass) and Matt Abts (drums) are top-notch improvisers. But this is never at the cost of energetic performances. That’s where many jam bands fall short: they sacrifice dynamics and coherence for 10-minute pentatonic solos. Gov’t Mule isn’t one of those bands! The rhythm section is tight – synergy is the priority behind every musical choice. On Trane/Eternity’s Breath/ St Stephen, the communication between Hess and Abts is just phenomenal. They transition with ease between prog and jazz, jazz and blues. Revolution Come, Revolution Go also shows how much the quartet can groove. Their improv is always built on the steady foundations of Haynes’ writing. From that starting point, they are given free reign to play on which ever style they please. Bring On The Music: Live at The Capitol is the crowning jewel to a long and successful career. © Alexis Renaudat/Qobuz
From
CD$15.49

Blues - Released June 28, 2019 | Provogue Records

From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Blues - Released April 26, 2019 | Provogue Records

Hi-Res
From his origins as Wes Montgomery’s worthy heir to the funky Give Me the Night, his cover of On Broadway, his partnering with Al Jarreau, his participation on the Gorillaz’s The Now Now and his tributes to Nat King Cole, George Benson has always shown that he handles large tasks with ease. But above all, he remains one of the best jazz guitarists of his generation, whatever the style. At 76 years old, the funky virtuoso from Pittsburgh pays homage to the Mecca of music, New Orleans, and two pioneers of rock’n’roll that were lost to the world in 2017, Chuck Berry and Fats Domino. The record features ten covers by the two geniuses that George Benson performs with a sense of refinement. His bluesy style and ferocious skill are even held back slightly. In its place the guitarist offers a tribute of class, temperance and subtlety. ©Max Dembo/Qobuz
From
CD$12.99

Blues - Released April 26, 2019 | Provogue Records

Following up 2013's urbane Inspiration: A Tribute to Nat King Cole, George Benson returns with another tribute production, 2019's ebullient Walking to New Orleans: Remembering Chuck Berry and Fats Domino. Interestingly, while Benson is best known for his funky instrumental jazz of the '70s and '80s, and smooth R&B crooning of the '80s and '90s, both of these latter-career tributes find him tackling material from even older traditions. Where Inspiration was a lushly swinging standards album, Walking to New Orleans is all blues grit and old-school R&B swagger. Though primarily influenced by jazz artists like Wes Montgomery and Charlie Christian, Benson certainly owes at least a modicum of his soulful style to early rock legends Berry and Domino, both of whom helped shape the sound of modern rock and pop music. As Benson grew up in Pittsburgh, the album's title evokes a conceptual travelogue as he moves from the Midwest through Berry's home state of Missouri, all the way down South to Domino's hometown of New Orleans. To help achieve this rootsy trek, Benson worked with producer Kevin Shirley (John Hiatt, Aerosmith, Joe Bonamassa) at Nashville's Ocean Way Studios, where he also conscripted the assistance of pros like drummer/music director Greg Morrow, guitarist Rob McNelley, pianist Kevin McKendree, and bassist Alison Prestwood. The results are loose and straightforward as Benson (primarily showcased here as a singer) takes on Berry favorites like "Walking," "Nadine (Is It You?)," and "Memphis, Tennessee," as well as Domino hits like "Ain't That a Shame," "I Heart You Knocking," and "Blue Monday." These are earthy and robust productions that never stray too far afield of their rock & roll source. © Matt Collar /TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Blues - Released March 15, 2019 | Provogue Records

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Blues - Released February 8, 2019 | Provogue Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$12.99

Blues - Released October 5, 2018 | Provogue Records

It took Doyle Bramhall II 15 years to deliver Rich Man, the sequel to 2001's Welcome, but only two to follow that 2016 record with Shades. Appropriately, Shades feels looser than its predecessor and more direct, too. Where Rich Man was dotted with epics, Bramhall keeps things generally concise on Shades, and he also firmly grounds the album in soul. The first sounds on Shades may recall the thick, heavy blues grooves of the Black Keys but by the time Bramhall gets to the chorus of "Love and Pain," he spins the song into classic '60s R&B. He's too restless a musician to stay there -- with the Greyhounds, he kicks up some noise on "Live Forever," the Tedeschi Trucks Band pulls out some deep blues on a cover of Bob Dylan's "Going Going Gone," and he indulges in psychedelia on "Parvanah" -- but he keeps circling back to sounds steeped in Southern soul. It results in a more cohesive album than its predecessor, but it's the lack of fussiness that makes Shades a better record: now that he's just knocking out songs and records, his music feels bracing and immediate. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Blues - Released July 20, 2018 | Provogue Records

Hi-Res
The Apocalypse Blues Revue is coming back strong with this second album released by Provogue, The Shape Of Blues To Come. A rather dangerous music! Did the Florida-based American band sell their soul to the devil in exchange for such mastery of electric blues? The question can be raised. Made up of Shannon Larkin (drums), Brian Carpenter (bass), Ray Cerbone (vocals) and Tony Rombola (guitar), the quartet respects the essence of blues while still imposing their own style. Right from the first track, Open Spaces, the suspense is at its peak. A gong, followed by whispers, then a deep, wearisome singing, almost voodoo-esque. In 2016, the band had already taken this path down to the purgatory with their first eponymous album. Two years later, they venture towards hell itself, for a diabolical concert. Between metal and roots music, the Apocalypse Blues Revue is capable of composing around blues as well as moving away from it. With them, boredom is forbidden. Incendiary riffs, an energetic voice swinging on the chorus of Have You Heard?! and carried by Larkin’s rhythmic force… There’s nothing to envy to heaven! There is a Morrison vibe to To Hell With You, but in this case Jim would be dressed in a rather Goth style to announce the apocalypse and the quartet’s takeover. © Anna Coluthe/Qobuz