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Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

If Wishbone Ash can be considered a group who dabbled in the main strains of early-'70s British rock without ever settling on one (were they a prog rock outfit like Yes, a space rock unit like Pink Floyd, a heavy metal ensemble like Led Zeppelin, or just a boogie band like Ten Years After?), the confusion compounded by their relative facelessness and the generic nature of their compositions, Argus, their third album, was the one on which they looked like they finally were going to forge their own unique amalgamation of all those styles into a sound of their own. The album boasted extended compositions, some of them ("Time Was," "Sometime World") actually medleys of different tunes, played with assurance and developing into imaginative explorations of new musical territory and group interaction. The lyrics touched on medieval themes ("The King Will Come," "Warrior") always popular with British rock bands, adding a majestic tone to the music, but it was the arrangements, with their twin lead guitar parts and open spaces for jamming, that made the songs work so well. Argus was a bigger hit in the U.K., where it reached the Top Five, than in the U.S., where it set up the commercial breakthrough enjoyed by the band's next album, Wishbone Four, but over the years it came to be seen as the quintessential Wishbone Ash recording, the one that best realized the group's complex vision. ~ William Ruhlmann
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Rock - Released August 30, 2019 | M.i.G. - music

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Rock - Released January 1, 2002 | Geffen*

If Wishbone Ash can be considered a group who dabbled in the main strains of early-'70s British rock without ever settling on one (were they a prog rock outfit like Yes, a space rock unit like Pink Floyd, a heavy metal ensemble like Led Zeppelin, or just a boogie band like Ten Years After?), the confusion compounded by their relative facelessness and the generic nature of their compositions, Argus, their third album, was the one on which they looked like they finally were going to forge their own unique amalgamation of all those styles into a sound of their own. The album boasted extended compositions, some of them ("Time Was," "Sometime World") actually medleys of different tunes, played with assurance and developing into imaginative explorations of new musical territory and group interaction. The lyrics touched on medieval themes ("The King Will Come," "Warrior") always popular with British rock bands, adding a majestic tone to the music, but it was the arrangements, with their twin lead guitar parts and open spaces for jamming, that made the songs work so well. Argus was a bigger hit in the U.K., where it reached the Top Five, than in the U.S., where it set up the commercial breakthrough enjoyed by the band's next album, Wishbone Four, but over the years it came to be seen as the quintessential Wishbone Ash recording, the one that best realized the group's complex vision. ~ William Ruhlmann
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Rock - Released November 12, 1974 | Geffen* Records

With producer Bill Szymczyk running the sessions, the group finally gets a studio sound as solid as their concert sound. Most impressive all the way through. ~ Bruce Eder
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Rock - Released January 1, 1991 | Geffen* Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1970 | Geffen*

For a band that quickly evolved into a radio-friendly prog-leaning outfit, it's a wonder that Wishbone Ash started out as the boogie and blues-based group that this debut reveals. If the term "jam band" existed in 1970, Wishbone Ash surely would have been a major player in that genre. As it was, this album stacked up nicely when compared with other British hard rock releases that year. Not as complex or calculated as Led Zeppelin's Led Zeppelin III but definitely more focused than Mott the Hoople's Mad Shadows, Wishbone Ash more closely resembled Benefit by Jethro Tull, a group that hadn't yet adopted its own progressive elements. The dual lead guitar attack of Andy Powell and Ted Turner was a component that none of the above bands possessed, but unfortunately their (shared) lead vocals lacked the punch and authority necessary for hard rock bands to be taken seriously. So while they could rock as loudly and convincingly as virtually anyone, their lead singers, perhaps, held them back from being the force they should have been. The follow-up, Pilgrimage, took steps to rectify Wishbone Ash's odd position, but this album nevertheless opened eyes and ears and revealed to the rock & roll community a band with incredible potential and talent. ~ Dave Sleger
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Rock - Released December 5, 1973 | Geffen

No surprise -- in concert was the best way to hear Wishbone Ash, because the studio was just too sterile an environment, at least for their hardest-rocking stuff to take off. Anyone really into the group should own this record. ~ Bruce Eder
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Rock - Released February 21, 2014 | Solid Rockhouse

After a lengthy legal battle over the Wishbone Ash name with founding vocalist and bassist Martin Turner, guitar/vocalist Andy Powell, the group's only remaining original member, prevailed. As a result, his band sounds totally revitalized on Blue Horizon, WA's 22nd album. Though few punters consider it, this group was one of the great purveyors of classic arena rock's twin-guitar sound or the European sound of the Atlantic (the first was Thin Lizzy). So much so, they won an enormous following in the birthplace of such pyrotechnics, America. Few rock bands of any era have explored as many musical geographies as this lot, from hard electric blues-rock to sword-and-sorcery prog and in the 1990s, even trance! This ten-song set is a reassessment of their core strengths: (mostly) well-written tunes, excellent production, and winding instrumental passages. Though Powell doesn't possess nearly the vocal range as Turner, he is an architect of the band's sound. As such, his shortcomings in front of a microphone aren't as glaring as they might otherwise be. His three partners -- guitarist Muddy Manninem, bassist Bob Skeat, and drummer Joe Crabtree -- are all decent harmony singers, which lets him off the hook a bit. Opener "Take It Back," with its hypnotic drums, intricate staccato guitar patterns, and a guest fiddle by Pat McManus, is a vintage WA jam -- with the drummer taking the lead guitar break in the outro! Fans of the group's blues sound should relish the punchy, stinging boogie in "Deep Blues," the title track, and the steep barroom rowdiness of "Mary Jane." (Yes, these are dumb titles. What century is this?) If these cuts were all that was on offer, the set might have been worth purchasing -- in no small part due to the fine production of Tom Greenwood -- but there's more: the spacy psychedelia of "Being One," the knotty prog of "Tally Ho!," and "Way Down South," which possesses a nice pop hook. "American Century" is an expansive stop-and start instrumental. There are two clunkers: the attempt at grooving guitar funk in "Strange How Things Come Back Around," and closer "All There Is to Say," which tries to meld Celtic music and hard rock but doesn't get there. Those cuts aside, Blue Horizon is much better than fans -- or anyone else -- had a right to expect. ~ Thom Jurek
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Rock - Released January 1, 1977 | Geffen* Records

Another very enjoyable recording, with their folk inclinations rising to the fore again on several tracks. ~ Bruce Eder
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Pop - Released January 1, 1976 | Geffen* Records

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Rock - Released October 30, 2009 | Golden Core

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Pop/Rock - Released May 4, 2010 | C&B Media

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Pop - Released January 1, 1976 | Geffen*

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Progressive Rock - Released September 29, 2014 | 2014 Autarc Media GmbH, CH.

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Pop/Rock - Released September 25, 2007 | Bhm Productions

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Rock - Released January 1, 1971 | Geffen*

Wishbone Ash's sophomore release, Pilgrimage, unveiled their creative genius after a debut that merely presented them as a boogie- and blues-based rock outfit. The opening track, "Vas Dis," with its jazz bassline, slicing rhythm guitar, and gibberish vocals was their answer to "Hocus Pocus" by Focus (or vice versa as both were released in 1971). "Jail Bait" has gone on to become a Wishbone Ash staple as well as possessing one of the more memorable guitar riffs of '70s rock & roll. A conscientious effort seemed to be in place for this band to write and perform material better suited to their gentler vocal tendencies. Where Wishbone Ash essentially went full tilt throughout, Pilgrimage is a moodier affair that includes beautiful, slower melodies like the brief instrumentals "Alone" and "Lullaby" along with the chilling "Valediction," which should have been an Ash classic but is rarely featured on live and hits collections. Even though this band toned it down a bit for this album, their impressive guitar playing was heightened due to the variance in their songwriting. Next to Argus this is the Wishbone Ash album to judge all other Ash albums by. ~ Dave Sleger
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Rock - Released March 3, 2017 | Eagle Rock Entertainment

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Pop/Rock - Released August 1, 2012 | Vantage Music

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Rock - Released January 1, 1997 | Geffen*

The twin-guitar-jam-infested ramblings of Wishbone Ash are for some the place where British rock and Southern rock meet in an unholy alliance, both influencing the other. This 11-track collection of this British group's best starts features nine classic tracks, plus two previously unreleased versions of a pair of Wishbone Ash favorites. The album, which was compiled and co-produced by founding member Andy Powell, includes "Blind Eye," "Phoenix," "The Pilgrim, "Sometime World," "Warrior, "Throw Down the Sword," "Persephone," "F.U.B.B." and "Living Proof." Also included is a live version of "Lorelei," recorded at a Liverpool concert back in 1976, and an acoustic version of "Blowin' Free," recorded specifically for this compilation in 1997 by the band. ~ Cub Koda
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Rock - Released August 1, 2013 | Castle Communications