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Alternative & Indie - Released September 14, 2010 | Epitaph

Distinctions 3F de Télérama - 5/6 de Magic
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 7, 2010 | Epitaph

Distinctions 3F de Télérama
Leaping from the majors to the indies, Weezer misses not a beat, choosing to continue the co-writing craze Rivers Cuomo kicked off on 2009’s Raditude. Hurley -- named after Jorge Garcia’s beloved Lost character for no particular reason, but anybody with three eponymous albums in an eight-LP career doesn’t care much for titles in the first place -- is marginally louder and rougher than the clean sheen of Raditude, but not enough to fool anybody into thinking this is a punk rebirth. For Cuomo, independence means he can follow whatever notion seizes his fancy, and in this case he’s capitalizing on collaborations, penning eight of Hurley’s ten songs (the album runs four longer on a Deluxe Edition that includes a strong cover of Coldplay’s “Viva la Vida”) with a roster so diverse it borders on the nonsensical. Rivers is open to writing with anybody: he’ll construct slick modern pop with professional songsmiths Desmond Child and Linda Perry; sharpen up his power pop with the assistance of fellow former college rockers Dan Wilson and Ryan Adams, whose respective “Ruling Me” and “Run Away” are among the album’s highlights; and craft his sweetest, smartest tunes with No Doubt’s Tony Kanal (the crisp “Smart Girls”) and Rick Nowels, who co-wrote the classic “You Get What You Give” with Gregg Alexander and collaborates on “Hang On” here -- then, of all people, Cuomo gets old pro Mac Davis to work on the closer, “Time Flies.” Nothing on paper ties all these writers together but Rivers is the common denominator, so there’s a consistency of sound -- his co-writers amplify quirks and help him hone his craft, turning the songs tight and efficient. Sometimes, the quirks become overwhelming -- the one-note joke “Where’s My Sex?” wears out its welcome by the second verse -- but usually the melodies and riffs are clean, simple, and powerful, hooking immediately and sticking around for a while. Again, Cuomo doesn’t suppress his emotion; he just prefers sentiment (albeit delivered somewhat ironically as on lead single “Memories”), but what he loves most of all is a pure pop song and Hurley offers up its fair share. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 24, 2019 | Crush Music - Atlantic

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 27, 2017 | Crush Music - Atlantic

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 7, 2016 | Crush Music

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Ambient/New Age - Released January 1, 2008 | Geffen

Even after 15 years, the original kings of punky pop still have a couple of tricks up their collective sleeve. Who would have suspected that a terminally tongue-in-cheek band like Weezer would ever offer up a straight-ahead Christmas record? Well, that’s exactly what they’ve done--the CHRISTMAS WITH WEEZER EP finds the band delivering completely unironic versions of holiday classics like “Silent Night” and “The First Noel,” albeit rocked up with the usual Weezer approach, so you won’t think you’ve wandered into a Bing Crosby album by mistake or anything.
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Rock - Released January 1, 2010 | Geffen

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 21, 2018 | Crush Music - Atlantic

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 24, 2019 | Crush Music - Atlantic

Always a band keenly attuned to the fleeting fashions of the internet, Weezer were the ripe target of an online campaign. A 14-year-old fan intuited that Weezer would be amenable to covering Toto's 1982 chart-topper "Africa," so she started a Twitter campaign in December 2017 to petition the band to do just that. After six months of cajoling, Weezer relented -- by releasing a version of "Rosanna," the hit Toto had before "Africa." The next week, the band unveiled their cover of "Africa," which swiftly became Weezer's biggest hit since 2005, matching that year's "Perfect Situation" placement at 51 on the Billboard Hot 100. Somehow, that wasn't the end of the shenanigans. As the single stayed on the charts, Toto returned the favor by covering Weezer's "Hash Pipe," then Weezer parodied themselves for the long-delayed video for their "Africa," bringing Weird Al Yankovic along for good measure. Just when the "Africa" cycle seemed to finally end, Weezer sprung The Teal Album upon the world. Inspired by the success of "Africa," Weezer cut an entire album of oldies, generally sticking to the '80s, but finding space for the Turtles' "Happy Together" and Ben E. King's "Stand by Me" -- two '60s chestnuts that were omnipresent during the Reagan era. The exception to this rule is conspicuous: a version of TLC's 1999 smash "No Scrubs." By covering a beloved modern R&B hit, Weezer is opening themselves up to scorn and ridicule -- the deliberately gangly band is certainly not smooth enough to replicate TLC's groove -- but that's kind of the point of The Teal Album: it's designed to generate online chatter for its existence, not for what it is. Taken on a strictly musical terms, The Teal Album is pretty anodyne stuff. Weezer replicates the arrangements of beloved songs, adds a bit more fuzz on the guitar solos, and flattens the vocal affectations, which amounts to one weird trick: Weezer doesn't attempt to make the songs their own, yet these versions unmistakably sound like Weezer. Chalk it up to the curious obsessions of Rivers Cuomo, a songwriter who used to carry around a notebook so he could dissect why one pop song worked and another didn't. The meticulous replications of The Teal Album aren't a million miles away from that notebook, but by having Weezer pop into familiar settings, Cuomo has created a hyper-saturated, uncanny valley, where nothing seems quite real. An ideal album for the internet, in other words. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 1, 2016 | Crush Music - Atlantic

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Taking the notion of self-titled albums standing as a statement of identity to an extreme, Weezer puts out a self-titled record whenever they're ready to enter a new phase of their career. Designed to be dubbed The White Album -- a nice cheeky nod to the classic 1968 double album from the Beatles -- the 2016 installment of Weezer isn't nearly as messy as the group's last color-coded eponymous record. With that 2008 Red Album, Weezer embarked on a confused and chaotic middle age, an era that the tight, focused White Album effectively brings to an end. Much of this precision is due to Jake Sinclair, a producer who revived Fall Out Boy's commercial prospects with his savvy work on 2015's American Beauty/American Psycho, who gives this Weezer a modern sheen that skillfully avoids desperation, but he not only understands what teens like, he understands why teens love this group. As a kid, he played in Wannabeezer, a Weezer cover band, and his knowledge of the group is fast; he isn't one to fetishize the emotional bloodletting of Pinkerton at the expense of the rest of the band's work, he likes the fun stuff just as much. Sinclair recognizes that one of Rivers Cuomo's strengths is his love of craft, so he gave the singer/songwriter a mission: to create a spiritual sequel to the California pop of the Blue Album. To that end, Cuomo set up a profile on the dating app Tinder, using his encounters as research to supplement the observations he had while whiling away afternoons in Santa Monica and Venice Beach. Such a conscious remove is crucial to the success of The White Album: like Chuck Berry singing about "Sweet Little Sixteen" when he was 32 years old, Cuomo isn't diving into the thick of things, he's merely reporting what he sees. Sometimes, Cuomo betrays his age -- the "listen to Bacharach" line on "Do You Wanna Get High" is a bigger '90s throwback than the very sound of the album -- but that's also part of his charm: his eccentricities slip out from the cracks in his carefully constructed songs. Sinclair wisely decides to accentuate all these quirks, whether they derive from Cuomo or the band's interplay, so The White Album crackles underneath its tight presentation. Drums and guitars thunder, harmonies cascade, and there are surprises that add color without being showy. Weezer flirt with past and present, happily taking cues from forefathers -- "(Girl We Got A) Good Thing" consciously evokes the Beach Boys, just like how "Wind in Our Sail" brings to mind Jack Antonoff -- but The White Album winds up existing in a fantasy world that's entirely the band's own creation. This is Weezer's version of Southern California, one where the girls aren't bedecked in bikinis and where alienation sometimes seems comforting, maybe because their "Endless Bummer" is consciously fleeting, a sweet, sad coda to an album devoted to all the good times that can be had under the sun. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 29, 2018 | Crush Music - Atlantic

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 7, 2014 | Universal Records

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Two songs into Everything Will Be Alright in the End, Rivers Cuomo sings "we belong in the rock world," a repudiation of the big beat experimentation of Raditude, a 2009 record that found Weezer working with such pop producers as Dr. Luke and Butch Walker. Weezer fans eager for Pinkerton, Pt. 2 are often quick to bristle at Cuomo's experimentations, so when the guitarist sings that they're "rockin' out like it's '94," he's not only not lying -- they went so far as to once again hire Ric Ocasek, the producer of the group's debut, to helm this ninth studio album -- but he's reassuring his audience that he's left all those pounding dance beats behind. The weird thing is, Weezer already shook off the ghost of Raditude via 2010's quickly released indie Hurley, so the emphasis on the group returning to rock feels a little odd, but Everything Will Be Alright in the End does trump its immediate predecessor by being bigger, bolder, slicker, and stickier than Hurley. Some of this is indeed due to the presence of Ocasek. His exacting production, anchored as much in pummeling arena rock as new wave pop, polishes and preserves Cuomo's quirks, but it's also true that Rivers has decided to indulge in his eccentricities once again. Take away the woolly mammoth-sized guitars and "Back to the Shack," with its overt references to "In the Garage," and Everything Will Be Alright in the End doesn't feel especially like early Weezer, not with the dexterous syncopation of "I've Had It Up to Here" providing a midpoint palate-cleanser and a neo-prog rock suite concluding the proceedings. By having the record follow these twisty detours, Cuomo provides a counterpoint to the classicist pop Weezer pursue elsewhere, but even such succinct, sculpted pop as "The British Are Coming," "Ain't Got Nobody," "Cleopatra," and "Go Away" (the latter a duet with Best Coast's Bethany Cosentino) never feels like a desperate scramble back home. Rather, a feeling of acceptance underpins Everything Will Be Alright in the End: there's a sense that Weezer made another record of massive, hooky rock not only because that's what the fans want but because they know it's what they do best. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 24, 2018 | Crush Music - Atlantic

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 27, 2017 | Crush Music - Atlantic

"Mexican Fender" opens Pacific Daydream with big, crunching arena rock guitars, but that's the only throwback thing about the album. A deliberate reaction to 2016's Weezer (White Album), a record where producer Jake Sinclair encouraged the band to act like it was 1994, Pacific Daydream is a thoroughly modern affair, complete with drum loops and electronic flourishes, all wrapped up in a shiny package. Despite all of this contemporary flair, Weezer aren't exactly pandering to a younger audience. Much of Pacific Daydream is gleaming mall-pop on par with Beck's Colors: music made by veteran alt-rockers who are as aware of trends as they are of their own middle age, so they try to split the difference between the two. Such concentrated fusion appeals to an eccentric like Rivers Cuomo, who cleverly writes a tribute to the Beach Boys that doesn't sound a thing like Brian Wilson and drops a reference to Stevie Ray Vaughan on a song that's designed to play during happy hours at chain restaurants. This odd subversive streak tends to alienate fans who prefer Cuomo's emo side -- a side that's not entirely absent here, but songs that start in that fashion usually wind up bending back to his current obsessions. That's the pleasure of Pacific Daydream: beneath its glossy surface, there's not only plenty of melody, but a perverse sense of humor that keeps the record from sounding too smooth and settled. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 7, 2016 | Crush Music

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 17, 2017 | Crush Music - Atlantic

Alternative & Indie - Released June 29, 2017 | Crush Music - Atlantic

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 11, 2018 | Crush Music - Atlantic

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 21, 2018 | Crush Music - Atlantic

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Alternative & Indie - To be released March 1, 2019 | Crush Music - Atlantic

Prolific alternative rock group Weezer present their 12th studio album with an eponymous title, with this one being known as the Black Album. The release stands in marked contrast to 2016's White Album, with darker themes and a heavy reliance on synths and samples. The Black Album was produced by David Sitek (TV on the Radio). ~ Liam Martin

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